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Thread: Oil changing question

  1. #1
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    Oil changing question

    Brought up to warm the engine oil up before changing it. Today it was about 100 degrees in the garage and I was wondering how hot the ambient temperature had to be before you didn't need to warm up the engine. Does more oil drain out of a hot engine that has just been run, or a cold engine that has had all the oil drain down into the crankcase? Any comments?

  2. #2
    Registered User Blacque Jacque Shellacque's Avatar
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    It just drains faster. If your in a hurry to get it done, drain when hot. If not, drain with the engine cold and let it drip for a couple of hours or overnight.

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    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    The drain hot or cold has very strong advocates on both sides.
    Google the subject and you will see.
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  4. #4
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSAddict View Post
    The drain hot or cold has very strong advocates on both sides.
    Google the subject and you will see.
    A friend of mine wants to dump the oil before the vehicle stops "rocking" from coming to a stop......after a suitable long drive.
    A friend of mine with a mobile lube service changes them "cold"- thousands of vehicles.
    After watching both, I see no real advantage or disadvantage

    I have always done a change hot...or at least real warm- personal preference. It just "seems" better to me

    OM
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    It makes no real difference.

    If the old oil was so bad you can't have the tiniest amount left in there...then why were you running that oil for the last XXXX number of miles?

    Chris

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    Definitely change when warm/hot. It flows faster, taking more dirt out with it. The dirt is already suspended in the hot oil and more of it will drain with the oil. When the bike's cold or cooled off, all the dirt is on the bottom of the pan/engine and there's no telling how much stays stuck there when that cooler oil slowly drains out.

    I've read this mentioned in Owner's and service manuals.

  7. #7
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
    A friend of mine wants to dump the oil before the vehicle stops "rocking" from coming to a stop......after a suitable long drive.
    A friend of mine with a mobile lube service changes them "cold"- thousands of vehicles.
    After watching both, I see no real advantage or disadvantage

    I have always done a change hot...or at least real warm- personal preference. It just "seems" better to me

    OM
    I'm on your side of the fence. On full warmed boxers I leave on the sidestand for min 5 min (to let the oil drain down from the cooler) and then on the centerstand and drain.
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  8. #8
    Bluenoser
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    The dirt is already suspended in the oil, so it really doesn't matter if you drain it hot or cold. Just let it drain for awhile until it stops dripping. I think most of us like to have the oil warm but that is really just a personal preference. The main thing is to change the oil as required by the bikes specs. Hot oil can burn so be careful.
    1995 R100Rt with Kenna Sidecar, 1998 VT1100T

  9. #9
    Registered User AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Actually it's not just a personal preference. It's what the repair manuals have said for many years..
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  10. #10
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    I wonder if anyone has conducted any actual research on this topic. You know, like taking measurements to determine the level of contaminates remaining in an engine after changes done with the oil at various temperatures and at various time spans after the engine being run (agitation). It could be done by guys and gals with lofty degrees dressed in white lab coats, and outfitted with real expensive gizmos and computers that process data at impressive speeds. Who would do this sort of research? Who stands to benefit from knowing the ideal oil temperature and degree of agitation? And what would they do with this hard and expensively won information? Perhaps publish it in owner's and service manuals?
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  11. #11
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    I'm not sure the oil is in the engine long enough to matter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSAddict View Post
    I'm not sure the oil is in the engine long enough to matter.
    Know what you mean, had a couple Chevy's like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akbeemer View Post
    I wonder if anyone has conducted any actual research on this topic. You know, like taking measurements to determine the level of contaminates remaining in an engine after changes done with the oil at various temperatures and at various time spans after the engine being run (agitation). It could be done by guys and gals with lofty degrees dressed in white lab coats, and outfitted with real expensive gizmos and computers that process data at impressive speeds. Who would do this sort of research? Who stands to benefit from knowing the ideal oil temperature and degree of agitation? And what would they do with this hard and expensively won information? Perhaps publish it in owner's and service manuals?
    With oil at over $10 a quart and filters around $15 a pop I want to get the most miles out of my oil before changing. Starting with a clean crankcase seems to be the best way to start.

  14. #14
    Registered User jandhumphreyme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DARKCLOUD View Post
    With oil at over $10 a quart and filters around $15 a pop I want to get the most miles out of my oil before changing. Starting with a clean crankcase seems to be the best way to start.
    If this is your goal, you may want to begin a testing program with http://www.blackstone-labs.com/. Their testing will advise you exactly what is happening with your engine, transmission, final drive and oil. Their analysis will recommend optimum change intervals based on actual oil samples not conjecture.
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    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DARKCLOUD View Post
    With oil at over $10 a quart and filters around $15 a pop I want to get the most miles out of my oil before changing. Starting with a clean crankcase seems to be the best way to start.
    Then use synthetic and double the BMW recommended change interval.
    Kent Christensen
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