Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: 2V - Valve Shim Thickness - Printed vs. Actual (95 K75S)

  1. #1
    Registered User drneo66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    577

    2V - Valve Shim Thickness - Printed vs. Actual (95 K75S)

    I recently acquired about 20 valve shims for my '95 K75S and I'd like to get rid of the ones that I can no longer use.


    Out of all of them, I only have one that still has the printing left on the backside. That particular one reads 2.50, but I measure it at 2.55 mm with my digital calipers. Therefore, can I assume that all of the other other valve shims are actually +0.05mm above what they would be printed at?

    Hopefully that makes sense...

  2. #2
    I wouldn't try to generalize. You may be measuring a manufacturing tolerance which can swing from + to -, or be in the middle. I make no assumptions and always measure.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  3. #3
    3 Red Bricks
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pleasanton, Ca.
    Posts
    4,918
    Did you zero your digital calipers?

    I've never found a used shim more than .02mm off the printed size. New shims are almost always within .01mm.

    Your saying that you're getting .05 off. That's the next size. No way would BMW label the shims one full size off. The problem has to be with your caliper. Not reset to zero or bent.



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  4. #4
    Dum vivimus vivamus ted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,686
    When I did my valves recently mine were off that much, some more. That was, until the BMW tech who was guiding me along showed me how to properly zero out then how to properly measure with the $15 Harbor Freight digital caliper I had bought. Once I figured it out it was just as accurate as the $? Snap-On the Tech used. And as Lee mentioned, they were all pretty much spot on, maybe .01 variance - due perhapse more to the copious amounts of coffee I was drinking. I still measured each one at least twice before I put it in.

    PSA - you can still buy the blue tin (empty) that keeps them all segregated by size, unfortunately the blue tin packed with shims is NLA.
    Ted
    "A good stick is a good reason"
    1994 K75RT
    Moto Pages

  5. #5
    Registered User drneo66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    577
    Yes - 2 calipers - zero'd both - I guess that ONE shim is off??

    It's the only one of the lot that still has the printing. I was maybe thinking that 0.05 was recessed into somewhere - thanks for the info!

  6. #6
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784
    I'm an old school machinist. I allways grab a micrometer, caliper, scale and double check my parts and thier dimensions.

  7. #7
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784

    Precision measuring tools and device's

    Picture 1320.jpg
    These tools are used to measure accurately things like shims. 3 dial calipers, 1 digital caliper and 1 depth micrometer. I think the digital caliper is good to 0.0005 . The others are good to 0.001. There are more accurate vernier depth and standard micrometers that are accurate to 0.0001. They have another vernier on the barrel for this degree of mearure. All of these are over 20 years old.

  8. #8
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784

    Depth micrometer

    Picture 1321.jpg
    Also showing the tool to adjust the micromter to 0.001. Set the tool on a special ground surface plate/ granite plate to set adjustment. I don't have access to either, so I use my precision angle plate or 1,2,3 block. Nice tool to use getting measurements in blind holes.

  9. #9
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784

    Dial indicators

    Picture 1322.jpg
    Very accurate tools, used in many applications. Set up work on the bench, lathe, mills. Endless aplications in the machine shop, job shop, engine building, head work. Good tool.

  10. #10
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784

    More Accurate Measureing Devices

    Picture 1323.jpg
    Scales, angle finder, small hole gauge, telescopic hole gauge, adjustable parallels. Used all these in machine shops, tool and die shops, and automotive machine shops.

  11. #11
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784

    More gauges

    Picture 1326.jpg
    It's endless. Gauges for every thing. These are radius gauges. drill and wire gauge Radius finder

  12. #12
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784
    Picture 1357.jpg
    Inside and outside calipers. Radius scribes Inside and outside calipers. Measuring devices. Primitive tools that are very useful in a machine shop

  13. #13
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784
    Picture 1363.jpg
    Several micrometers. Also examples of standards. These are precise machined tools that are used to zero out your micrometers. A good set of micrometers will come with a standard for each size to zero out your mike's. 2 different types shown. Also shown are the wrenches that adust the micrometer to 0.000. The true name for micrometer is micrometer caliper, but I don't know anyone who uses that term.

  14. #14
    Registered User barryg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    12,784
    Yes measuring parts can be a little frustrating. When you have the proper tools and their properly calibated. Piece a cake.

  15. #15
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nibley, UT USA
    Posts
    1,456
    But...but...where are the gage blocks to wring together, and the sine blocks? 😎

    Best,

    GTRider
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST 1984 R80 G/S-PD 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C 2010 K1300GT 2018 R1200GS
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •