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Thread: Why the Scooter ?

  1. #16
    Registered User mylanc's Avatar
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    The 71 year old father of a friend of mine rode across the US on a Piaggio MP3. Check it out: http://www.noagelimitpiaggio.us
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  2. #17
    Cupcake greg's Avatar
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    I bought a Paiggio BV350 two years ago. The first year I rode the heck out of it. A great choice for the "round town" errands. I put the top box on it and it worked out great. Then I got rid of the GS and went to the RTW. The Scooter just sits. I've got under 2000 miles on it. It's going up for sale.

    One thing that I've found is after riding motorcycles for the last 50+ years you build habits that can be interrupted by riding a scooter. When breaking on the scooter I grab both handles. One is front brake only and the other is combined. When I get on the RT for the first few stops I find myself pulling in the clutch. Not a good thing.
    Greg
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangerreece View Post
    And don't forget... "Nice Knockers!"

  4. #19
    I think I'm going to have to net flicks that movie now.
    R. Reece Mullins Ebony R1200RT (Gretchen)
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  5. #20
    And back to the original thread question or assertion, with one exception, the thread seems to support his supposition. Clearly not definitive by any means, there does seem to be a plausible trend to down sizing in later years, though based on the thread alone I would venture that the age seems to be closer to 70 rather than 50.
    R. Reece Mullins Ebony R1200RT (Gretchen)
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    BMW MOA President

  6. #21
    Registered User airheadbullet's Avatar
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    I'm another convert that fits the closer to 70 than 50 demographic (66). Riding since 1968 on almost too many different bikes to remember, although I started on a 650 Triumph. I spent many years as a runner and doing all those stupid hang time sports like volleyball and basketball. The years and the miles haven't been kind.
    About 6-7 years ago the pain in one hip and knee became noticeable after 15 minutes in the saddle and almost unbearable after an hour or so.
    Here started the search for a ride that would keep me pleasurably in the saddle and not make each ride an endurance in pain. Five motorcycles later (R bikes, K bikes, and even a Honda Pacific Coast) I was still in the same predicament. For about a year I entertained the scooter idea and finally bought a 2003 Honda 600 maxi scooter. FINALLY! Here was a comfortable ride. For a year I alternated rides on my remaining Airhead ('81 RT) and the scooter usually in the foothills of the Rockies west of Boulder. I'd go out for 2-4 hours and it was no contest. The pain free ride of the scooter was remarkable. Equally remarkable was that I enjoyed riding the scooter almost as much as my beloved Airhead. I sold the scooter and the Airhead and bought a 2013 C650GT BMW in September of 2013. 6,000 miles later it was still the best decision for me. I still need to have a knee replacement but when I'm on the scooter I don't feel it. Nor do I feel it when I get off.
    I say you do whatever you need to do to keep you in the saddle. For me the scooter does that. For me it wasn't an issue of strength or balance, just comfort.

  7. #22
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangerreece View Post
    And back to the original thread question or assertion, with one exception, the thread seems to support his supposition. Clearly not definitive by any means, there does seem to be a plausible trend to down sizing in later years, though based on the thread alone I would venture that the age seems to be closer to 70 rather than 50.
    Since the typical BMW rider seems to be closer to 70 than 50, maybe they will become a target scooter market. The average age of my BMW riding friends is older than the average of my maxi-scooter riding friends.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  8. #23
    Registered User Cask23's Avatar
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    Why the Scooter revisited ...


    Wow ... I am really impressed, though I shouldn't be, about the response to my assertion. It does appear that 70 is the new 50!!

    I think it also depends upon your storage situation. We don't have a garage, and I drive my R1150RT directly up a wooden ramp and into a shed. That's the easy part. But backing it down the ramp onto the lawn and moving it into the driveway is always a hassle. It's so damn top heavy and you have to be oh so careful, lest you end up testing your 'back to the motorcycle pick up skills' (which has happened many times). Can't help thinking that a scooter would be easier to manipulate. That being said, once your past 'minimum controllable airspeed' I can whip the RT with no sweat. It's just parking it and unparking.

    I'm 59, by the way ... apparently young for the demographic. Thanks so much to everyone (even Paul got involved) for weighing in on this one.

    ~ Les

  9. #24
    Jeff Wilson life member Justscootin's Avatar
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    I am 53 when I got the 650gt I was 51. The scooter weighs in at 575 pounds and is top heavy if you try to pick it up. The top end of the faring has the battery, power windshield motor abs controls and many other items under there. Even though the motor and rear drive stretch out the length of the scooter it is top heavy. Sitting at a stop light you can't feel the weight but you may need help picking it up, but the scooter flies through twisty roads.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cask23 View Post
    Wow ... I am really impressed, though I shouldn't be, about the response to my assertion. It does appear that 70 is the new 50!!

    I think it also depends upon your storage situation. We don't have a garage, and I drive my R1150RT directly up a wooden ramp and into a shed. That's the easy part. But backing it down the ramp onto the lawn and moving it into the driveway is always a hassle. It's so damn top heavy and you have to be oh so careful, lest you end up testing your 'back to the motorcycle pick up skills' (which has happened many times). Can't help thinking that a scooter would be easier to manipulate. That being said, once your past 'minimum controllable airspeed' I can whip the RT with no sweat. It's just parking it and unparking.

    I'm 59, by the way ... apparently young for the demographic. Thanks so much to everyone (even Paul got involved) for weighing in on this one.

    ~ Les
    Jeff
    A bad day on the C650 GT scooter is better than the best day at work

  10. #25
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    I think everyone should start an exercise routine, to include some light weights, especially as you approach 60. Don't automatically give in to the belief that just because you're getting older that you are getting too weak to handle a real motorcycle. Don't give in to the aging process without a fight.

  11. #26
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cask23 View Post

    I think it also depends upon your storage situation. We don't have a garage, and I drive my R1150RT directly up a wooden ramp and into a shed. That's the easy part. But backing it down the ramp onto the lawn and moving it into the driveway is always a hassle. It's so damn top heavy and you have to be oh so careful, lest you end up testing your 'back to the motorcycle pick up skills' (which has happened many times). Can't help thinking that a scooter would be easier to manipulate.

    ~ Les
    You might want to consider a midsize scooter and keep your RT. When we were in our 30s my wife and I had scooters along with two BMW motorcycles. I had a Honda 250 Elite and my wife had a Yamaha 200. The scooters were great for everyday use around town and fast enough for highway use.
    I have the bug for a scooter again, and if I get one, it would be in the 200 to 250 class. Something like the 200 Burgman. http://www.suzukicycles.com/Product%...15/UH200A.aspx

    http://www.revzilla.com/common-tread...ki-burgman-200
    Last edited by Lee; 01-16-2015 at 05:57 PM.
    Lee
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  12. #27
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cask23 View Post
    Wow ... I am really impressed, though I shouldn't be, about the response to my assertion. It does appear that 70 is the new 50!!

    I think it also depends upon your storage situation. We don't have a garage, and I drive my R1150RT directly up a wooden ramp and into a shed. That's the easy part. But backing it down the ramp onto the lawn and moving it into the driveway is always a hassle. It's so damn top heavy and you have to be oh so careful, lest you end up testing your 'back to the motorcycle pick up skills' (which has happened many times). Can't help thinking that a scooter would be easier to manipulate. That being said, once your past 'minimum controllable airspeed' I can whip the RT with no sweat. It's just parking it and unparking.

    I'm 59, by the way ... apparently young for the demographic. Thanks so much to everyone (even Paul got involved) for weighing in on this one.

    ~ Les
    I don't think backing a scooter is that different than backing a motorcycle if they are the same weight and have the same seat height. My
    Burgman 400 was easier to back than my R80RT and R1200CLC because of the low seat as well as the lighter and lower weight. My Burgman 650 is heavy with a higher seat so it is not as easy to back. It is also harder to move because there is no neutral. I have a little V-Star with a very low seat that is easier to back than all of them. The BMW 650 scooters are very tall as scooters go so I would not expect them to be good backers.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  13. #28
    rsbeemer 22600's Avatar
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    Age? Maybe, maybe not

    Quote Originally Posted by Cask23 View Post
    I have a feeling that people in their 50's are turning in their RT's, R's, and S's for scooters. Is there any support for this and if so, what is the main reason people make the shift ?
    I'm 67 and have been riding a scooter on off for over 17 years. I have owned BMW's (and still do) for over 40 years. For me the scooter is mostly for convenience and maneuverability. I ride my scooter at least 60km 5 days a week taking the kids to school and back. (Yes, they both ride on the scooter with me.) It's all city driving with lots of traffic and lots of other scooters.

    When I'm in the STATES, I ride my '78RS on the long trips. So, there a lots of different reasons people choose to ride a scooter. I can't tell you about old people; I aint got there yet.

    dwb
    MOA#22600 Gold 1978 R100rs, White 2013 Suzuki 650 Burgman, 125cc Kymco , 180cc Kymco Racing King
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  14. #29
    Fuse lit.... PittsDriver's Avatar
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    Being the contrarian that I am I'm going to reject the notion offered by the OP that switching to scooters has anything to do with age and more to do with whether nor not it's the right two-wheeler for the mission. I'm 56 years old and my last three purchases were a '12 K1600GT that I've ridden for a multi-week road trip every year for 3 years; a S1000RR that I've got several track days on and have also done 400 miles days on multi-day rides; and a dual sport KLR that I'm going to take on the Trans America Trail this year. Getting "old" is for people that don't know any better. I'll be spending this year doing a nearly 5,000 mile dirt ride and I'll be back at the California Superbike School and doing an average of one track day a month from April to October and the bikes I own I selected because they're the best choice for the job. If and when I want to put something in my garage for running around historic Annapolis on errands as it's primary mission, a BMW scooter would be a fine, capable, and stylish choice that has nothing to do with age. Having taken one several times from Bob's BMW for a loaner, i also know that it's a very capable bike that I wouldn't hesitate to take on a more serious, long mile mission as well. That 650GT cruises just fine at 80+ mph all day long.
    2012 K1600GT, Vermillion Red (for the epic road trips) (gone but not forgotten)
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  15. #30
    Cage Rattler wezul's Avatar
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    My first taste of two-wheeled fun was a mini bike.
    Basically a lawn mower engine, centrifugal clutch, chain drive.
    Right hand throttle and if you were lucky you had front brakes as well as rear.
    Twist the throttle and go. Man I was hooked.

    So my 650GT is just a continuation of that, I guess.

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