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Thread: Booster Plug

  1. #1

    Booster Plug

    anyone had any good or bad things to say about the Booster Plug to even out idling and acceleration
    have an 2009 RT thank you

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRIT00704106 View Post
    anyone had any good or bad things to say about the Booster Plug to even out idling and acceleration
    have an 2009 RT thank you
    Have had one on my 2008 R200GS for 2+ years. Will smooth out low rpm acceleration dramatically; idle was not a problem to begin with so no real change there for me.

  3. #3
    Registered User Dann's Avatar
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    Have one on my 07 RT

    I like it. Smoother idle and even acceleration
    YMMV
    Daniel
    If you can park it, and not turn around to admire it before walking away, you bought the wrong one.
    2019 R1250RT - 2007 R1200RT (186,000 km) - IBA # 56396

  4. #4
    Jim Woodard JWOODARD's Avatar
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    I've had on on my '07 RT for over 4 years. It improved low rpm performance; not as jerky as it was without it.
    Jim W.

  5. #5
    Boxer Fan JT_R1200S's Avatar
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    I know the booster plug is hotly debated, I feel it works well on a stock setup or for use with just a muffler change. -JT
    Last edited by JT_R1200S; 12-01-2014 at 03:41 AM.
    (2015 R1200R, HP2 Sport #168, 2003 GL1800)

  6. #6
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    The claim of all devices that modify the IAT (air temperature sensor) is: that sending a signal that the incoming air is colder than it actually is results in richer fueling during Open Loop operation of the bike's ECU (fueling and spark timing computer).

    The BoosterPlug is a well made product, with a remote probe that can be mounted in the Intake Manifold air-stream. In my tests (I own one that I no longer use), it accurately shifted the incoming air temperature signal. Initially, this resulted in a 6% richer Open Loop mixture; however, that effect is temporary. It is easy to install and won't harm your bike.

    The reason that the benefit of IAT-shifting is temporary is that all BMW ECUs (Motronics and BMSKs) compare actual fueling to the desired fueling by use of an Oxygen Sensor (two in the R1200s, one for each cylinder). When the fueling computer sees that the actual mixture is richer than target, it start to develop correction factors called Fuel Trims.

    The goal of the fuel trims is to keep the exhaust Oxygen at precisely the level for best catalytic converter operation as often as possible--lambda=1 or 14.7:1. This minimizes unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and NOx.

    At first the trims are Short Term but eventually the ECU sees that all the short term trims are reducing fueling. The ECU then converts the short term trims to Long Term trims that it applies to all fueling, negating the effect of an IAT shifter. Last year I measured and confirmed this operation here and for a few pages that follow: http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....l=1#post915428.

    If you believe that added fuel will improve your ride, the PCV and EJK units add fuel by eliminating Closed Loop operation and lengthening the injection pulses. They work but you lose the adaptive ability of your ECU, they often add a lot of fuel and the ECU operates in Limp Home Mode, widening the fueling spread.

    Another technique is to shift the reference point of the Oxygen Sensor richer (lambda-shifting) with an Innovate Motorsports LC-2 or a Nightrider AF-XIED pair. Lambda-shifting maintains the full operation of the ECU, adds a small, precise amount of fuel and uses the power of the ECU to add mixture richness.
    Last edited by roger 04 rt; 11-25-2014 at 11:22 AM.

  7. #7
    Enjoy The Ride saddleman's Avatar
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    I have one on my 2000 K1200LT. It works fine in the heat of summer & not so fine on the cold winter mornings.
    Dave Selvig
    2008 Black LT
    2004 Black LT
    2000 Canyon Red LT

  8. #8
    I put one on my 2012 R1200GS after I had installed a Akrapovic TI slip on.

    Prior to putting on the pipe the low rpm throttle response was very snatchy to the point of frustration. Once I added the siip on this problem mostly went away. I added the booster plug after that and did not notice much difference.

    My feeing is that first gear on this bike is to high. It should be geared slightly lower for better off road control. (50+ years on motorcycles)

  9. #9
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    I just put one in just before I winterized my '13 RT. Hoping for better performance.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger 04 rt View Post
    The claim of all devices that modify the IAT (air temperature sensor) is: that sending a signal that the incoming air is colder than it actually is results in richer fueling during Open Loop operation of the bike's ECU (fueling and spark timing computer).

    The BoosterPlug is a well made product, with a remote probe that can be mounted in the Intake Manifold air-stream. In my tests (I own one that I no longer use), it accurately shifted the incoming air temperature signal. Initially, this resulted in a 6% richer Open Loop mixture; however, that effect is temporary. It is easy to install and won't harm your bike.

    The reason that the benefit of IAT-shifting is temporary is that all BMW ECUs (Motronics and BMSKs) compare actual fueling to the desired fueling by use of an Oxygen Sensor (two in the R1200s, one for each cylinder). When the fueling computer sees that the actual mixture is richer than target, it start to develop correction factors called Fuel Trims.

    The goal of the fuel trims is to keep the exhaust Oxygen at precisely the level for best catalytic converter operation as often as possible--lambda=1 or 14.7:1. This minimizes unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and NOx.

    At first the trims are Short Term but eventually the ECU sees that all the short term trims are reducing fueling. The ECU then converts the short term trims to Long Term trims that it applies to all fueling, negating the effect of an IAT shifter. Last year I measured and confirmed this operation here and for a few pages that follow: http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....l=1#post915428.

    If you believe that added fuel will improve your ride, the PCV and EJK units add fuel by eliminating Closed Loop operation and lengthening the injection pulses. They work but you lose the adaptive ability of your ECU, they often add a lot of fuel and the ECU operates in Limp Home Mode, widening the fueling spread.

    Another technique is to shift the reference point of the Oxygen Sensor richer (lambda-shifting) with an Innovate Motorsports LC-2 or a Nightrider AF-XIED pair. Lambda-shifting maintains the full operation of the ECU, adds a small, precise amount of fuel and uses the power of the ECU to add mixture richness.
    I sent your statement above to the manufacturer for clairification and the response is below

    Hi Ron,

    The discussion about the BMW ECU's ability to update its own basic fuel map is a long term rumor. (This rumor/discussion seems to focus on the BMW bikes alone).
    But with the usual narrow band lambda sensor that every manufacturer (including BMW) is using, this is not possible at all. The narrow band sensor is very digital (on/off) in its behavior, so it's impossible to use the sensor information to update the fuel map. To do this you would need a wide band sensor, but this technology is certainly not for production bikes as they are fragile and expensive. I've been experimenting a lot with adaption and narrow band / wide band sensors, so I know in details how they works (and destroyed quite a few wide band sensors on the way??).

    Think about it for a minute: If the lambda sensor was able to provide information that would allow the ECU to update it's own fuel map, it would override it's own temperature and air pressure input signals too, meaning that BMW is just spending lots of money on useless sensors. Also it would override all kind of fuel remapping attempts: Power Commanders, BoosterPlug's, even the factory's own software updates. This is obviously not so.

    The Lambda sensor is installed to correct the Air/Fuel Ratio error that comes from the production tolerance of sensors/ fuel pump/injectors, and the lambda sensor is necessary because the law demands that the Air/Fuel Ratio is kept borderline lean.
    Tolerances of different components are being summed up, and if they all go in one direction, you will have a bike with really poor (lean) fueling and lots of stalling problems. If they all sum up in the opposite direction, you would have a bike that was running a little richer and you would have better running bike. This is why otherwise equal bikes are behaving differently, and the Lambda sensor is doing it's best to fix the problem, but can only do this in closed loop situations, not in open loop. This is where the BoosterPlug is a good fix.

    The fact that similar bikes are not equally affected by the lean mixture requirements is another proof that there's no adaption taking place. If the rumor was correct and the ECU was adapting itself, all bikes of the same type would end up with the same Air/Fuel Ratio over time. But a bike that is extremely lean from the factory does not correct it self, and a lucky owner of a bike that is running a tad richer than the rest will not see this advantage dissapear over time.

    The Lambda sensor will provide a real time fuel correction when you are riding in closed loop conditions, but this is just a final adjustment to the fuel injection calculations - there's no fuel map updates being made so the BoosterPlug is not being cancelled out over time.

    Sorry for the rather technical answer, but there was no other way I could explain this.

    We have sold way above 15.000 units since we started the BoosterPlug company in 2009, and our customers are as happy with the BoosterPlug in year 2-3-4 as they we're on day one. And we have lots of returning customers purchasing their second or third BoosterPlug when they get a new bike. Fancy sales talk can usually fool a few people, but we would never have seen this massive support for our device if it stopped working after some time.

    I purchased one and will be installing it for the 2015 riding season, I guess time will tell.

  11. #11
    Ponch ponch1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rajackson View Post
    I sent your statement above to the manufacturer for clairification and the response is below

    Hi Ron,

    The discussion about the BMW ECU's ability to update its own basic fuel map is a long term rumor. (This rumor/discussion seems to focus on the BMW bikes alone).
    But with the usual narrow band lambda sensor that every manufacturer (including BMW) is using, this is not possible at all. The narrow band sensor is very digital (on/off) in its behavior, so it's impossible to use the sensor information to update the fuel map. To do this you would need a wide band sensor, but this technology is certainly not for production bikes as they are fragile and expensive. I've been experimenting a lot with adaption and narrow band / wide band sensors, so I know in details how they works (and destroyed quite a few wide band sensors on the way??).

    Think about it for a minute: If the lambda sensor was able to provide information that would allow the ECU to update it's own fuel map, it would override it's own temperature and air pressure input signals too, meaning that BMW is just spending lots of money on useless sensors. Also it would override all kind of fuel remapping attempts: Power Commanders, BoosterPlug's, even the factory's own software updates. This is obviously not so.

    The Lambda sensor is installed to correct the Air/Fuel Ratio error that comes from the production tolerance of sensors/ fuel pump/injectors, and the lambda sensor is necessary because the law demands that the Air/Fuel Ratio is kept borderline lean.
    Tolerances of different components are being summed up, and if they all go in one direction, you will have a bike with really poor (lean) fueling and lots of stalling problems. If they all sum up in the opposite direction, you would have a bike that was running a little richer and you would have better running bike. This is why otherwise equal bikes are behaving differently, and the Lambda sensor is doing it's best to fix the problem, but can only do this in closed loop situations, not in open loop. This is where the BoosterPlug is a good fix.

    The fact that similar bikes are not equally affected by the lean mixture requirements is another proof that there's no adaption taking place. If the rumor was correct and the ECU was adapting itself, all bikes of the same type would end up with the same Air/Fuel Ratio over time. But a bike that is extremely lean from the factory does not correct it self, and a lucky owner of a bike that is running a tad richer than the rest will not see this advantage dissapear over time.

    The Lambda sensor will provide a real time fuel correction when you are riding in closed loop conditions, but this is just a final adjustment to the fuel injection calculations - there's no fuel map updates being made so the BoosterPlug is not being cancelled out over time.

    Sorry for the rather technical answer, but there was no other way I could explain this.

    We have sold way above 15.000 units since we started the BoosterPlug company in 2009, and our customers are as happy with the BoosterPlug in year 2-3-4 as they we're on day one. And we have lots of returning customers purchasing their second or third BoosterPlug when they get a new bike. Fancy sales talk can usually fool a few people, but we would never have seen this massive support for our device if it stopped working after some time.

    I purchased one and will be installing it for the 2015 riding season, I guess time will tell.
    What he's not really answering is that if the O2 sensor has the final say, how would it allow a mixture that is not within range of what is desired by the factory? Would it not make corrections to the A/F ratio to bring it back in line? He kind of makes contradictory statements: The Lambda sensor will provide a real time fuel correction when you are riding in closed loop conditions, but this is just a final adjustment to the fuel injection calculations and there's no fuel map updates being made so the BoosterPlug is not being cancelled out over time.. The thing is the A/F mixture is being corrected from the misinformation that the booster plug provides the ECU to make the engine run richer. FWIW, the engine runs in closed loop nearly all the time unless you are riding 1-3 miles, which most people wouldn't. The only way this wouldn't be true is if the O2 sensors were disconnected or the engine ran in open loop all the time. I'd like to read Roger's response though, which would be more informative.
    My Motorrad
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  12. #12
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger 04 rt View Post
    The claim of all devices that modify the IAT (air temperature sensor) is: that sending a signal that the incoming air is colder than it actually is results in richer fueling during Open Loop operation of the bike's ECU (fueling and spark timing computer).

    The BoosterPlug is a well made product, with a remote probe that can be mounted in the Intake Manifold air-stream. In my tests (I own one that I no longer use), it accurately shifted the incoming air temperature signal. Initially, this resulted in a 6% richer Open Loop mixture; however, that effect is temporary. It is easy to install and won't harm your bike.

    The reason that the benefit of IAT-shifting is temporary is that all BMW ECUs (Motronics and BMSKs) compare actual fueling to the desired fueling by use of an Oxygen Sensor (two in the R1200s, one for each cylinder). When the fueling computer sees that the actual mixture is richer than target, it start to develop correction factors called Fuel Trims.

    The goal of the fuel trims is to keep the exhaust Oxygen at precisely the level for best catalytic converter operation as often as possible--lambda=1 or 14.7:1. This minimizes unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and NOx.

    At first the trims are Short Term but eventually the ECU sees that all the short term trims are reducing fueling. The ECU then converts the short term trims to Long Term trims that it applies to all fueling, negating the effect of an IAT shifter. Last year I measured and confirmed this operation here and for a few pages that follow: http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....l=1#post916282.

    If you believe that added fuel will improve your ride, the PCV and EJK units add fuel by eliminating Closed Loop operation and lengthening the injection pulses. They work but you lose the adaptive ability of your ECU, they often add a lot of fuel and the ECU operates in Limp Home Mode, widening the fueling spread.

    Another technique is to shift the reference point of the Oxygen Sensor richer (lambda-shifting) with an Innovate Motorsports LC-2 or a Nightrider AF-XIED pair. Lambda-shifting maintains the full operation of the ECU, adds a small, precise amount of fuel and uses the power of the ECU to add mixture richness.
    This earlier post tells the whole story. I could rebut several of the points made by the manufacturer but there has not been a single measurement made by an IAT-shift manufacturer that shows that the product has the effect claimed.

    On the other hand the link above is to a series of measurements showing that IAT-shift is canceled by the setting of the lambda sensor in Closed Loop first, and then in Open Loop areas by Mixture Adaptation.

    Mixture Adaptation is what allows the ECU to compensate for wear of: fuel injectors, fuel pressure, air filter, etc. it also is what adjusts the leaning effect of ethanol.

    Here's the question, if IAT shifting worked as described wouldn't one of the manufactures of one of those devices made a measurement and showed it? I have offered for years to make any measurement but none has been suggested. Enough said.

  13. #13
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    If you don't want to read the detail, here is a measurement of Open Loop AFR before and after a Mixture Adaptation interval. For reference, my lambda-sensor AFR with the LC-1 installed is 13.8:1. The chart below clearly shows that the BP and fuel pressure increase in Open Loop has been negated—that is that the Open Loop AFR moved from 12.1:1 all the way to 13.7:1, almost exactly the Closed Loop target.

    If a maker of these devices could show a chart or measurement where this didn't happen, perhaps they could substantiate their claims.

    [/QUOTE]

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