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Thread: Spark plug change on 2010 r1200rt

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    Spark plug change on 2010 r1200rt

    I have been unable to find a video showing procedure for changing the plugs on my 2010 r1200rt

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    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckr View Post
    I have been unable to find a video showing procedure for changing the plugs on my 2010 r1200rt
    This will probably do better in the Hexhead/Camhead part of the forum.
    I'll give it a move for you.
    Good luck.
    Gary
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    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckr View Post
    I have been unable to find a video showing procedure for changing the plugs on my 2010 r1200rt
    Make sure you get the correct (thin-walled)socket !!!

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    Registered User Motodan's Avatar
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    or grind down a regular size socket.
    F850GS

    MOA #46783

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    Registered User pappy35's Avatar
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    Thin Walled Spark Plug Socket at Autozone for $7+tax.

    I'm not sure there's a 'procedure' per se. It would be helpful to have one of these but basically you just replace them like you would in a car.

    According to Haynes manual the torque (you do have a torque wrench - if not get one of those too or know how to repair the thread in the head) is 12N-m and the gap should be 0.7mm to 0.9mm. There are, in case you didn't know or notice 2 plugs per cylinder.
    '13 R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition

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    Addicted to curves azgman's Avatar
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    You may want a coil puller as well.

    And here is a good place for the procedure.
    MOA #107139
    RA #28511

  7. #7
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    Search YouTube or Google for "R1200 spark plug change", lots of results.

    Procedures are similar for all hex, cam and wet head variations.

    With caution, and a rag to prevent scratches on the valve cover, a large screwdriver will pry off the coils.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

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    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Hope the OP , chuckr, figured it out in 2014

    Always some good info anyways
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    Registered User Motodan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Hope the OP , chuckr, figured it out in 2014

    Always some good info anyways

    Duh! I hate it when this happens. BTW he posted in August 2015 he got a K1600...wonder if his '10 RT is just sitting there because the plugs never got changed???
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    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Motodan View Post
    Duh! I hate it when this happens. BTW he posted in August 2015 he got a K1600...wonder if his '10 RT is just sitting there because the plugs never got changed???
    Funny how old threads resurface...and have responded to years old ones a few times as well.


    Maybe he traded it in instead of changing the plugs Even though two are way easier than those six!
    Steve Henson-Mod Team and SABMWRA Prez

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    Registered User pappy35's Avatar
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    I never understood why folks get excited about resurrecting old threads (not saying any of this year's posters did mind you). I've always thought it was helpful to keep all the related info in one place. Anywho...yeah, I didn't notice the date either.
    '13 R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition

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    Registered User ajaxthegreater's Avatar
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    No anti seize or lube

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckr View Post
    I have been unable to find a video showing procedure for changing the plugs on my 2010 r1200rt
    Just be sure NOT to lube the plug threads. They go in clean and dry.
    Bill in Highlands Ranch, CO
    2012 R1200RT

  13. #13
    Registered User pappy35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajaxthegreater View Post
    Just be sure NOT to lube the plug threads. They go in clean and dry.
    Really? I was going to use copper anti-seize when I do mine next month. Why?
    '13 R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by pappy35 View Post
    Really? I was going to use copper anti-seize when I do mine next month. Why?
    This is a hot topic like oil and tires. Disclaimer: I use anti seize on spark plugs. Alternate view: Tom Cutter whom I respect hates anti seize on plugs. Fact: BMW does not specify anti seize on plugs.

    The plus. If you ever had a steel plug gall in the aluminum threads on a head you might like anti seize. The minus. Use of anti seize or any other lubricant messes with the specified torque setting - reducing it by maybe 25%. That is with the lubricant 25% less measured torque is tight enough and the specified torque might strip threads.

    Tom hates it because once there it is hard to detect and then using a torque wrench and the BMW spec can result in stripped threads. I like it because I know it is there and know what to do to avoid stripping threads.

    YMMV a lot.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  15. #15
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    This is a hot topic like oil and tires. Disclaimer: I use anti seize on spark plugs. Alternate view: Tom Cutter whom I respect hates anti seize on plugs. Fact: BMW does not specify anti seize on plugs.

    The plus. If you ever had a steel plug gall in the aluminum threads on a head you might like anti seize. The minus. Use of anti seize or any other lubricant messes with the specified torque setting - reducing it by maybe 25%. That is with the lubricant 25% less measured torque is tight enough and the specified torque might strip threads.

    Tom hates it because once there it is hard to detect and then using a torque wrench and the BMW spec can result in stripped threads. I like it because I know it is there and know what to do to avoid stripping threads.

    YMMV a lot.
    Good explanation
    Additionally, when a vehicle recommends high mileage plug changes (50K and up), itís a big help with the actual plug change.
    I like to blow out the spark plug area with compressed air befor starting the R&R.
    OM
    "You can do good or you can do well. Sooner or later they make you choose." MI5
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    2009 F800GS 1994 TW200

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