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Thread: From Cleveland to Halifax

  1. #1

    From Cleveland to Halifax

    Planning a trip in August from Cleveland OH to Halifax NS and want to run the length of the St Lawrence seaway. Is the best ride on the US side or Canada side? Coming back I am going down thru the east coast to the Outer Banks so only one shot at the seaway. Any suggestions would be appreciated! Don Miller RT Wet

  2. #2
    RK Ryder
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    From Ohio, I would take the NY route and then cross at Ogdensburg NY into Ontario. (Avoid Niagara Falls, Toronto etc as this traffic is most unpleasant.) The short stretch in NY is about as far as you can travel along the St. Lawrence on the American side. You then have a choice between taking the 401 east (not too busy on this section) or take Hwy 2 (not busy but borders the St Lawrence) towards Montreal. Before Montreal, get onto the Trans-Canada (Auto 20 I believe) an extension of the 401 into Quebec. It will be busy. The traffic around Montreal is interesting; stay very alert. It's your choice to follow the river on the south or the north shore. The south shore tends to have somewhat less traffic. I usually take the north shore to Quebec City and then cross over to the south shore (Auto 20 & 132). Do ride through Old Quebec City; a piece of leftover Europe on this continent. Back to riding. I have been told that you will see more of the river from the north side. This will entail riding to Baie Comeau, and then taking a 3+ hour ferry to the south shore where the road will wind around the Gaspe Pennisula. I always find this a scenic ride.

    Bear in mind, that this will take maybe four days or so. You did not state what your time limits are.

    A much quicker route, would be to travel to Quebec City, cross the St. Lawrence and travel along the south shore to Riviere-Du-Loup, and then head south on Auto 85 which turns into Hwy 2 in New Brunswick. This will take you to Moncton NB and from there to Halifax. This is the route that I normally take home. I can leave Amherst N.S and with two days of steady riding (not sunrise to sunset), be home in London for supper, about hundred miles due north of you in Cleveland.

    If you do not speak French, you might wish to check out the translation of some basic traffic information before setting out. Seldom,usually never, will you come across English road signs in Quebec, la belle province.

    Have a great trip!
    Paul F. Ruffell
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Niagara Riders & Knights of the Roundel #333

  3. #3

    Question

    Paul,
    What about 138 or is that the 132 you are referring to? Don

  4. #4
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by djmiller217 View Post
    Paul,
    What about 138 or is that the 132 you are referring to? Don
    Don, Rte 138 is the north shore route. I didn't take it on my last trip east in 2011 only because a hurricane had wiped out a bridge making it impossible for us to reach Baie Comeau.

    Rte 132 runs along the south shore. Done the south shore 132 three times, which is why 138 has an appeal for me. As well, I've had Quebecors tell me it's has a better view of the river. On either side, you'll have to opportunity to ride through some rather nice villages.

    In 2011, went with a friend from PA. Each time we stopped, he'd ask me if that was the ocean that we were riding beside as the north shore had been out of sight forever. Each time I replied with no, we're still riding beside the river. Remember, it's a 3+ hour crossing at Baie Comeau. It is one very large river.

    I have stopped in Trois Rivieres a couple of times for the night in a hostel. I think the price runs about $25 or less for the night. Of course if you spend the night in Old Quebec City, a two star (more than adequate) ran us $160, including parking, for one night.

    If you are riding in early August, there is accommodation to be found in our Canadian universities and colleges for similar prices. Let me know if you wish more information about those. My wife and I stayed in a residence in Halifax for 4 nights and 8 cafeteria breakfasts, for about $220 or so.

    You should have a good ride. I like taking the tunnel under the St. Lawrence in Montreal only because it is so long and deep that I lose GPS/satellite contact. When the two reconnected, my GPS top speed read 370km/hour. I was so disappointed when that GPS died because I had never erased that top speed. Bragging rights.

    Having told you about the Canadian route, this year in August, Bud and I are travelling to Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, through the US. Our primary reason is there are some US states that neither of us have ridden through and motels/camping/gas is much cheaper in the US.

    The route that I have suggested to you, is an excellent ride.
    Paul F. Ruffell
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Niagara Riders & Knights of the Roundel #333

  5. #5
    172526
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    The north shore is a far nicer scenery route than the south.

  6. #6
    Out There Somewhere ricochetrider's Avatar
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    From Paul_F:
    A much quicker route, would be to travel to Quebec City, cross the St. Lawrence and travel along the south shore to Riviere-Du-Loup, and then head south on Auto 85 which turns into Hwy 2 in New Brunswick. This will take you to Moncton NB and from there to Halifax. This is the route that I normally take home. I can leave Amherst N.S and with two days of steady riding (not sunrise to sunset), be home in London for supper, about hundred miles due north of you in Cleveland.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I can offer a couple things about riding from Quebec City to Riviere Du Loupe along the small river route. First of all, it's a nice little,road that runs thru small villages and open farm land. AND there's a VERY cool little vintage motorcycle museum along the way : L'Epopee De La Moto.

    http://www.epopeedelamoto.com/epopee_en.asp?no=49

    And once in Rivi?re Du Loupe, you may stay at the Motel Au Vieux Fanal- where we paid about 70-80$$ Canadian for a spanking clean little room overlooking the St Lawrence River. It's an older 50s-ish motel with a sort of Mid Century ambience. We loved it. The nice owner lady spoke English reasonably well.

    http://www.motelauvieuxfanal.com

    In Olde City QC, we stayed at the much more upscale Hotel Le Priori. We had the wives along and we all loved it there! One of THE best restaurants in all Quebec City... Absolutely fabulous.
    http://www.hotellepriori.com


    Not sure what you're into or how you roll etc. but this is from our experience a couple years back, June 2012. One other note, RE: language difficulties: I carry a small pocket phrase book by Lonely Planet. Our experience was that most folks spoke English- but I was prepared just in case. The LP phrase books are invaluable- I have several- French, Italian, Mexican Spanish, German, and one for Sweden, Denmark and Norway... Which might also cover Finland? Scandinavian Countries.

    These great "tools" are small enough to remain quite handy and in a pinch will get you through most any situation.
    Be The Change You Want To See In The World

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