Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Shift lever

  1. #1

    Shift lever

    Has anyone ever tried eliminating the [linkage] & [pivot] from the shift lever?

    It seems too me that one 'arm' would be better. A direct connection to the transmission, would eliminate all the linkage "slop" and as such make for a more positive shift.

    I have two Kawasakis and both of them the are a direct shaft, and shift very positively.

  2. #2
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    6,244
    The old Airheads originally came with direct-to-transmission shift levers.

    Adding linkage in 1978 was a definite improvement.

    Since aftermarket suppliers advertise all the time how "cheap" the manufacturers are and if you believe that hype then you'd certainly think BMW wouldn't add these extra parts if they could get away with it. In the real world, they add them because they improve things. Comparing a BMW to a Kaw is like comparing a BMW to a chebbie, i.e. yes you don't always get the good stuff with the cheapo brands.

    BMW engineers aren't perfect, but they're better than you or me or anyone else.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    The old Airheads originally came with direct-to-transmission shift levers.

    Adding linkage in 1978 was a definite improvement.

    Since aftermarket suppliers advertise all the time how "cheap" the manufacturers are and if you believe that hype then you'd certainly think BMW wouldn't add these extra parts if they could get away with it. In the real world, they add them because they improve things. Comparing a BMW to a Kaw is like comparing a BMW to a chebbie, i.e. yes you don't always get the good stuff with the cheapo brands.

    BMW engineers aren't perfect, but they're better than you or me or anyone else.
    Well, not sure I'm buyin' that. Better? improved?..in what way? Simplicity is a beautiful thing. I don't see how extra moving parts, improves anything? And yes I love my BMW , each one I've owned. But Kawasaki does build a good motorcycle. And the two i have, shift much more positively than does my Beemer?

    If they were perfect, people wouldn't change seats, more foot pegs, raise handlebars, etc........just sayin'

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,663
    that multi-part shift linkage allowed for movement of the footpeg to accomodate different sized feets without disrupting the shifter clearance.
    keep your upshifts above 5K prm whenever possible- the transmission will reward your efforts.
    you can replace your linked shifter with an earlier one-piece if you really care to; should not be a problem. alternatively, you should be able to get the linkage assembly rebuilt with new bushings (but no idea by whom or where).
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    that multi-part shift linkage allowed for movement of the footpeg to accomodate different sized feets without disrupting the shifter clearance.
    keep your upshifts above 5K prm whenever possible- the transmission will reward your efforts.
    you can replace your linked shifter with an earlier one-piece if you really care to; should not be a problem. alternatively, you should be able to get the linkage assembly rebuilt with new bushings (but no idea by whom or where).
    There was a one piece shifter, on Oilheads? My linkage is not worn out? It is just a matter of the more moving parts , the less direct the action.

    Do you always shift @ 5000 rpm?

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,663
    opps, my bad, cross-thread reading (Kent offered up the old airhead info, and i followed up on that).
    knowing your model/year bike would help; always a good idea to include that info in your thread title (Steve- i think you owe me a beer for doing your job for you. TOR as a collection site? )

    bushings on that OILhead shifter linkage can go bad; take a look at the parts fiche. http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fic...5&rnd=05012012

    always above 5k on shifts? no, not always. but usually. Sure smooths things out; like buttah. (maybe not I-Talian Ducati Buttah, but it is a very good Cherman Buttah.)
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    opps, my bad, cross-thread reading (Kent offered up the old airhead info, and i followed up on that).
    knowing your model/year bike would help; always a good idea to include that info in your thread title (Steve- i think you owe me a beer for doing your job for you. TOR as a collection site? )

    bushings on that OILhead shifter linkage can go bad; take a look at the parts fiche. http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fic...5&rnd=05012012

    always above 5k on shifts? no, not always. but usually. Sure smooths things out; like buttah. (maybe not I-Talian Ducati Buttah, but it iseers on me! b a very good Cherman Buttah.)

    Thanks, for the tip, & yeah if we ever meet up! first beer's on me!

    I did BTW take my assembly off, mic'd everything and all appears to be ok as far as wear. I was just wondering what others may have done? if anything.

    Heading down to the Euro Riders Rally in Burkesville ,Ky this weekend...shoud be several BMWs there. Have you ever been? If you're in this "neck-a-the-woods" something to do?!

    Ron

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,663
    actually, the beer request was to Steve, forum moderator. he knows whereof i speak.
    not out to KY all that often.
    consider TOR- Top of the Rockies- as a nice local rally with some beautiful riding in the area.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  9. #9
    Registered User ANDYVH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,376
    In the realm of "simple shifters" my 76 R100RS originally had the shift lever mounted directly to the shifter shaft on the tranny. But since the shift shaft and the footpeg were on two separate centerlines, spaced apart for proper foot position, when you shifted the shifter arc was "tighter" than the pivot arc of your foot. The shifter would "ride up" the instep of your boot when shifting.

    That, combined with the coarse, big shifter dogs common in BMW trannys made for some uncomfortable shifting, especially on a twisty tight road with lots of shifting. I later updated my 76 RS to use the shifter pivot on the footpeg centerline, with the additional linkage to the shifter shaft. MUCH improved feel and less fatigue. So in that case simpler was not better.

    On my 94 RS the setup is similar with the shift lever on the footpeg centerline. But what really improves the shifting on the older oilheads is:
    1. Proper clutch spline lubing, so the clutch plate moves easily
    2. Proper clutch lever adjustment if your bike has a cable operated clutch. this makes more difference than you might think. My 94 RS shifts well, for a 94 Oilhead.
    3. Preload the shift lever before making the shift. This is standard good proactice for any BMW twin with a tranny older than 2000.
    4. Engine speed, get it up higher for the shifts.
    5. MINIMAL clutch lever and throttle "chop" action. Maybe 1/4 clutch lever travel and barely move the throttle at all. The idea is to not interrupt the spinning momentum of that big twn engine and splinning clutch.
    Get trained! The best "performance" upgrade you can get is YOU. Visit msf-usa.org for training info.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •