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Thread: No brake exercise.

  1. #1
    Registered User motorman587's Avatar
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    No brake exercise.

    This is the no brake exercise. You can make slow u turns with just throttle, clutch and good body posture.
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    John
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    Registered User motorman587's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by motorman587 View Post
    This is the no brake exercise. You can make slow u turns with just throttle, clutch and good body posture.
    Another shot.
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    John
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    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    I'm sure this can be done, but I prefer to drag the rear brake on my K75. This clutch procedure may be better with integrated brakes, which I don't have. I feel it's too easy to change the pressure on the clutch during a turn and thereby accidentally unbalance the bike or cause it to lurch forward. On the other hand, maybe I need to practice better clutch control.
    Walter

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    be aware that regular use of friction zone (the "other" FZ) on a single-plate dry clutch bike (all R and Klassic-K BMWs) will insure very short clutch life, which will insure either a costly or time-consuming replacement.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    be aware that regular use of friction zone (the "other" FZ) on a single-plate dry clutch bike (all R and Klassic-K BMWs) will insure very short clutch life, which will insure either a costly or time-consuming replacement.
    Now you've done it... a clutch thread

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    Registered User motorman587's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    be aware that regular use of friction zone (the "other" FZ) on a single-plate dry clutch bike (all R and Klassic-K BMWs) will insure very short clutch life, which will insure either a costly or time-consuming replacement.
    And that is why we teach new motor cops instructors to teach the no brake method for the cost and damage on clutch repair.
    John
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    rsbeemer 22600's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by motorman587 View Post
    And that is why we teach new motor cops instructors to teach the no brake method for the cost and damage on clutch repair.
    Is BikerFish and Motorman agreeing with each other or disagreeing with each other?
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  8. #8
    Registered User motorman587's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsbeemer View Post
    Is BikerFish and Motorman agreeing with each other or disagreeing with each other?

    Sorry, did not read the post above his. What happens when the wife and the kids are ready to go. lol
    John
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    Hi John, long time no see.
    Marty Hill
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsbeemer View Post
    Is BikerFish and Motorman agreeing with each other or disagreeing with each other?
    Yes - basically both stating something similar, just from different perspectives.

    When I trained as a Motor Officer, use of rear brake drag was essential to the proficiency of most exercises. The trainers however mentioned that to become an H-D Motor Officer Instructor, they needed to demonstrate the same maneuvers without use of braking, so as establish themselves at a level 'above' the students they taught.

    I had two (one from the Michigan State Police, the other from Gulfport, MS) that admitted that after mastering the finesse of 'no brake dragging,' they still preferred occasional pressure on the rear brake pedal to smooth out their maneuvers.

    I respect Motorman, and his skills are most likely well above most average Motor Officers, such as myself.

    But having tried both approaches, I'll still be a 'trail-braker.' But like BikerFish says, do that sparingly with a BMW clutch, or get out your wallet.

    Ride safe, ride often and ride ATGATT!

  11. #11
    Registered User motorman587's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martyhill View Post
    Hi John, long time no see.

    hey marty, ears burning a couple of weeks ago. Missed see you in Ceder Key, was asking about you. Hope all is well!!!
    John
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  12. #12
    Registered User motorman587's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    Yes - basically both stating something similar, just from different perspectives.

    When I trained as a Motor Officer, use of rear brake drag was essential to the proficiency of most exercises. The trainers however mentioned that to become an H-D Motor Officer Instructor, they needed to demonstrate the same maneuvers without use of braking, so as establish themselves at a level 'above' the students they taught.

    I had two (one from the Michigan State Police, the other from Gulfport, MS) that admitted that after mastering the finesse of 'no brake dragging,' they still preferred occasional pressure on the rear brake pedal to smooth out their maneuvers.

    I respect Motorman, and his skills are most likely well above most average Motor Officers, such as myself.

    But having tried both approaches, I'll still be a 'trail-braker.' But like BikerFish says, do that sparingly with a BMW clutch, or get out your wallet.

    Ride safe, ride often and ride ATGATT!
    Well said Sir!
    John
    2004 BMW R1150R Black
    Contact me 4 (1&1) training, Expert witness in motorcycle crash reconstruction

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    But having tried both approaches, I'll still be a 'trail-braker.' But like BikerFish says, do that sparingly with a BMW clutch, or get out your wallet.
    ok, taking the bait...

    i feather y R1150GS' clutch a lot when traversing tricky sections off-pavement. At about 78k miles, the bike's rear main seal sort of needed attention and as a preventative I told the shop to replace my friction disk.

    it was practically brand new.

    so... either people are fanning their clutches while revving the bike too high (no need to rev) or something else is going on, but in my experience with both air and oilheads, the clutch is more than up to the task.

    ymmv.

    ian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visian View Post
    ok, taking the bait...

    i feather y R1150GS' clutch a lot when traversing tricky sections off-pavement. At about 78k miles, the bike's rear main seal sort of needed attention and as a preventative I told the shop to replace my friction disk.

    it was practically brand new.

    so... either people are fanning their clutches while revving the bike too high (no need to rev) or something else is going on, but in my experience with both air and oilheads, the clutch is more than up to the task.

    ymmv.

    ian
    I think you're spot on when you mention that you keep your 'rev's' as low as possible when feathering the clutch. It speaks well of how much fine-control you exercise when riding, and the resulting longevity of your dry clutch.

    Not all do that.
    Last edited by Greenwald; 02-20-2012 at 02:21 PM.

  15. #15
    Registered User ANDYVH's Avatar
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    Careful here, quoting this comment: "But having tried both approaches, I'll still be a 'trail-braker.' But like BikerFish says, do that sparingly with a BMW clutch, or get out your wallet."

    Not to steal the post or create another dialog, but "trail braking" in not dragging the rear brake through a turn. I had a MSF student last year, in a BRC ask me to watch for him "trail braking" during the class. I asked him if he knew what trail braking was, and he thought it was dragging the rear brake through turns. He was a fairly new rider on a CBR600.

    Real trail braking is a technique of using both brakes, while leaning into a turn, to in effect cause the bike to "squat" down at both ends, thus shortening the wheelbase/decrease the effective fork rake, and make a bike with a conventional front fork turn in quicker. The idea is that blended braking into the turn apex, along with rolling up the throttle, makes the bike turn quicker with good stability and even chassis attitude front to rear. I mention the conventional fork because the Telelever fork on the Oilheads does not squat significantly like a conventional fork during braking, so the trail braking effect is less significant.
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