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Thread: Coding Plugs R1100, R1150 Decoded

  1. #1
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Coding Plugs R1100, R1150 Decoded

    For updated, corrected information, jump ahead to: http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....l=1#post994823



    As part of my Wideband O2 project I dug into coding plugs and thought I'd share what I found.

    For R1100 and R1150 Motorcycles, BMW devised a Coding Plug and socket located in the Fuse/Relay box as a method to control different engine configurations (intake tubes, valve cams, cylinder heads) and to manage the engine with and without a Catalytic Converter--exception see 1993 R1100RS note below.

    While trying to figure out if there is a richer map in the 1150 (a hidden, surge-free, higher performance map) I got frustrated by the lack of a specific description by BMW of what each setting of the plug is for. Eventually I found a French BMW document (circa 2006) and BMW Bulletin 2701 dated 9/22/95 (and 10/31/2001). I also researched each configuration of 1100 & 1150 in the MAX BMW online parts database.

    For the 1100 series, BMW 2701 indicates that there are 6 engine/exhaust configurations that can be coded. I can not find any documentation on the number of maps in the R1150 but in the US but from the parts lists, I see 3 different plugs that are used (all for bikes with catalytic converters).

    The configurations appear to be designed to control fueling maps and spark timing maps. It is unclear how much difference there is between the individual maps or where those differences are.

    A simple way to divide the 6 R1100 maps: 4 are for cat equiped motorcycles, and 2 are for non cat equipped. Or a different grouping of the configurations: one is for shorter, larger diameter intake tubes (and cams & heads), one is for longer, thinner intake tubes (and the cams & heads), and one is for lower power or lower octane fuel.

    The coding plugs have four pins (numbered 30, 86, 87, 87a), pin 30 is a Motronic ground. Here is what the other 3 pins seem to signal:

    Pin 87 Grounded: Tells the Motronic that a catalytic converter is installed. Any fueling maps would likely be designed to arrive at an Air Fuel Ratio of 14.7:1 in the cruising range.

    Pin 87 Ungrounded: On the R1100 if this pin is NOT grounded, the Motronic would look for a CO potentiometer. Since the CO specification is 1.0 to 2.0%, which implies an AFR between 13.8 and 14.1, it seems likely to me that this fueling map would be designed to arrive at an AFR of 14.0:1--this might be a richer map. I don't know if this is true on the R1150 and in a test ride, ungrounding pins 87 and 87a on my R1150RT produced a somewhat leaner AFR than with both grounded.

    Pin 86: On the R1100, if this pin is grounded, it tells the Motronic that lower octane fuel, lower power is expected, and/or the motorcycle was shipped to Switzerland. In the US on the R1150GS, this pin is grounded for models allowing lower octane fuel. I don't know what's special about Switzerland but I'm guessing that Pin 86 is a signal to retard timing compared to other maps.

    Pin 87a: This pin is grounded or not, depending on which type of intake tube, valve cam and cylinder head is installed.

    Pin 87a R1100 models: Grounded for intake tubes 137 1134 1405/1406 (longer and narrower); cams 1560--on the R1100R and R1100GS. It is ungrounded for models R1100S, R1100RS, R1100RT which use the shorter, larger diameter tubes.

    Pin 87a R1150 models: Ungrounded for intakes tubes 1405/1406, etc.--R1150R, R1150GS and R1150GSA. It is grounded for models R1150RS, R1150RT (with the shorter fatter intake tubes).

    Pin 87a Fueling Effect: My guess is that the longer narrower tubes have a lower Volumetric Efficiency and need less fuel at some points in the fueling map. Therefore if you signal that fat tubes are installed (ungrounded 87a on the 1100s or grounded on the 1150s), and then install the long narrow tubes, you will get a richer mixture in parts of the fueling map. I have no idea what areas of the maps are affected.

    Summary
    The Techlusion Manual probably sums it up best: before installing their product, they advise that you install the correct Coding Plug for your BMW model and then reset the Motronic.

    If you have a catalytic converter and a stock O2 sensor the bike will eventually operate closed loop at an AFR of 14.7:1. And then its adaptation functions may reverse any gains that a different plug has temporarily brought, unless you also unplugged the O2 sensor.

    I know that others have had different experiences and some will disagree but it seems to me that the Coding Plugs are not the best way to try and richen the mixture of R1100s and R1150s.

    RB


    N.B. The 1993 R1100RS had its coding hard-wired (no plug socket) in the harness when shipped with a catalytic converter; but if it was shipped with no catalytic converter, it had an empty plug socket so a converter could be added later.
    Last edited by roger 04 rt; 06-05-2015 at 02:01 AM.

  2. #2
    Jammess jammess's Avatar
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    Yup, my '94 RSL has a cat and 02 sensor but no code plug and no code plug socket. Was manufactured in 06/93 and sold new in 08/93. Yesterday I got it in my head to maybe remove the cat and disconnect the O2 sensor then wire in a CO potentiometer. I disconnected the Motronic and found that there are no pin numbers on the male connector (Motronic) and no pin numbers on the female pin connector. I didn't go to the trouble of dis-assemblie of the connector to see if pins were numbered on the wiring side of the connector because if a pin is un-used there is no corresponding female connector pin. So I said to hell with it and put every thing back together. The bike runs fine with no surging. My big problem is I just don't like catalytic converters on motorcycles. One of these days I might take a grinder to the cat compartment and do a catectomy then take it to a good stainless welder to put back together. Then again I might just save my 50 bucks and live with it. My '04RT had its cat removed in the first year of its life. No performance improvement and none expected as the cat is non-restrictive. Does sound a bit more assertive though.
    Jammess

    '93 R1100RSL, '10 FJR1300A
    MOA # 50714

  3. #3
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger 04 RT View Post
    As part of my Wideband O2 project I dug into coding plugs and thought I'd share what I found.

    For R1100 and R1150 Motorcycles, BMW devised a Coding Plug and socket located in the Fuse/Relay box as a method to control different engine configurations (intake tubes, valve cams, cylinder heads) and to manage the engine with and without a Catalytic Converter--exception see 1993 R1100RS note below.

    While trying to figure out if there is a richer map in the 1150 (a hidden, surge-free, higher performance map) I got frustrated by the lack of a specific description by BMW of what each setting of the plug is for. Eventually I found a French BMW document (circa 2006) and BMW Bulletin 2701 dated 9/22/95 (and 10/31/2001). I also researched each configuration of 1100 & 1150 in the MAX BMW online parts database.

    For the 1100 series, BMW 2701 indicates that there are 6 engine/exhaust configurations that can be coded. I can not find any documentation on the number of maps in the R1150 but in the US but from the parts lists, I see 3 different plugs that are used (all for bikes with catalytic converters).

    The configurations appear to be designed to control fueling maps and spark timing maps. It is unclear how much difference there is between the individual maps or where those differences are.

    A simple way to divide the 6 R1100 maps: 4 are for cat equiped motorcycles, and 2 are for non cat equipped. Or a different grouping of the configurations: one is for shorter, larger diameter intake tubes (and cams & heads), one is for longer, thinner intake tubes (and the cams & heads), and one is for lower power or lower octane fuel.

    The coding plugs have four pins (numbered 30, 86, 87, 87a), pin 30 is a Motronic ground. Here is what the other 3 pins seem to signal:

    Pin 87 Grounded: Tells the Motronic that a catalytic converter is installed. Any fueling maps would likely be designed to arrive at an Air Fuel Ratio of 14.7:1 in the cruising range.

    Pin 87 Ungrounded: On the R1100 if this pin is NOT grounded, the Motronic would look for a CO potentiometer. Since the CO specification is 1.0 to 2.0%, which implies an AFR between 13.8 and 14.1, it seems likely to me that this fueling map would be designed to arrive at an AFR of 14.0:1--this might be a richer map. I don't know if this is true on the R1150 and in a test ride, ungrounding pins 87 and 87a on my R1150RT produced a somewhat leaner AFR than with both grounded.

    Pin 86: On the R1100, if this pin is grounded, it tells the Motronic that lower octane fuel, lower power is expected, and/or the motorcycle was shipped to Switzerland. In the US on the R1150GS, this pin is grounded for models allowing lower octane fuel. I don't know what's special about Switzerland but I'm guessing that Pin 86 is a signal to retard timing compared to other maps.

    Pin 87a: This pin is grounded or not, depending on which type of intake tube, valve cam and cylinder head is installed.

    Pin 87a R1100 models: Grounded for intake tubes 137 1134 1405/1406 (longer and narrower); cams 1560--on the R1100R and R1100GS. It is ungrounded for models R1100S, R1100RS, R1100RT which use the shorter, larger diameter tubes.

    Pin 87a R1150 models: Ungrounded for intakes tubes 1405/1406, etc.--R1150R, R1150GS and R1150GSA. It is grounded for models R1150RS, R1150RT (with the shorter fatter intake tubes).

    Pin 87a Fueling Effect: My guess is that the longer narrower tubes have a lower Volumetric Efficiency and need less fuel at some points in the fueling map. Therefore if you signal that fat tubes are installed (ungrounded 87a on the 1100s or grounded on the 1150s), and then install the long narrow tubes, you will get a richer mixture in parts of the fueling map. I have no idea what areas of the maps are affected.

    Summary
    The Techlusion Manual probably sums it up best: before installing their product, they advise that you install the correct Coding Plug for your BMW model and then reset the Motronic.

    If you have a catalytic converter and a stock O2 sensor the bike will eventually operate closed loop at an AFR of 14.7:1. And then its adaptation functions may reverse any gains that a different plug has temporarily brought, unless you also unplugged the O2 sensor.

    I know that others have had different experiences and some will disagree but it seems to me that the Coding Plugs are not the best way to try and richen the mixture of R1100s and R1150s.

    RB


    N.B. The 1993 R1100RS had its coding hard-wired (no plug socket) in the harness when shipped with a catalytic converter; but if it was shipped with no catalytic converter, it had an empty plug socket so a converter could be added later.
    Thanks for this great information. Good summary of the various coding plugs. You really have to be careful with some of the CCP plug "maps" floating around. Some are not clearly marked for 1100 or 1150 and many have assumed they are the same. Not so!
    My '00 RT is configured with the golden yellew CCP (pin 30 shorted to pin 87) which is standard for US models with a cat. Regarding your comment above on what the effect of removing it is I can assure you it is dramatic! The bike does run richer (verified with a CO probe) and surges much less (verified over many thousands of miles ridden with and without). Mileage is not affected much, maybe 1 or 2 MPG on a well tuned bike ridden normally.

    There have been anecdotal reports of performance and surging improvements by:
    - installing GS intake tubes. (I have two on order)
    - installing a CCP jumper that shorts pins 30, 87 and 87a which according to your info above is a GS intake tube with cat installed.

    After reading your post this info might explain why installing a GS type CCP on an 1100 RT might make the motronic fuel the engine differently by making it "think" there are different intake tubes installed which would affect the AFR. Whether the Motronic 2.2 with the O2 sensor installed "learns" and adjusts the AFR to compensate is another question. Somehow I doubt it. I really think the 2.2 just goes with what is configured and installed at start up and not nearly as "smart" as the 2.4 on the 1150 is. I have nothing concrete to back this up mind you and my opinion is worth what it costs!
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  4. #4
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    UPDATED June 4, 2015

    Earlier in this thread I posted up the best info I could find at the time on how BMW designed its Coding Plugs, or CCPs as they get called. Recently, I've come across much more accurate information from "the source". That is to say, the Motronic units themselves.

    It turns out, as most of you know, that each Motronic unit has an EPROM. The EPROM contains instructions for the Motronic, along with over 600 tables of data that include 8 sets of fuel and 8 sets of spark tables. It also includes a table with 8 text string entries that say exactly what each of the 8 Coding Plugs has been designed for.

    It is pretty easy to get the Motronic 2.4 to tell you what each CCP selects. You simply plug in a CCP and run an Autoscan with a GS-911. I've also confirmed the GS-911 report by having the chips removed from the Motronic and read with an EPROM reader and Hex Editor.

    The bottom line is that the ONLY good advice one can give is to use the stock Coding Plug. The reason is that there is no formula that says a certain pin on the CCP has any particular function (e.g. Pin 86 does not effect Octane). It also turns out that even if you compare two R1150GSs, for instance, the CCP can have a different meaning based on the date and delivery-location of the motorcycle.

    So ignore earlier posts in this thread, and since there are several different EPROMs, if you want to know which CCP is designed for which motorcycle-configuration for your bike, READ THE EPROM with a GS-911 (R1150).

    Five bikes I have data on at the moment are:
    2004 R1150RT US (USA) Twin Spark
    2003 R1150GS SA (South Africa) Twin Spark
    2002 R1150GS CA (Canada) Single Spark
    2002 R1150R CA Single Spark
    2002 R1150GS US Single Spark

    Here is the readout from each bike's various coding plug configurations. You can see the differences for yourself. If for example you put a Yellow Coding plug into the SA bike it selects No Series, and runs accordingly—barely at all!

    2004 R1150RT US (USA) Twin Spark
    No Coding Plug: R1150R/GS US+ECE
    Beige Coding Plug: R1150R/GS Japan
    Yellow Coding Plug: R1150R-GS Ocatan 91
    Pink Coding Plug: R1150RT-RS US+ECE
    30-86 Coding Plug: R1150RT/RS Japan
    30-86-87: R1100S US+ECE
    30-86-87a: No Valid String found
    30-86-87-87a: keine Serie (no series)

    2003 R1150GS SA (South Africa) Twin Spark
    No Coding Plug: R1150R/GS US+ECE
    Yellow Coding Plug: R1150R/GS Japan
    Beige Coding Plug: keine Serie (no series)

    2002 R1150GS CA (Canada) Single Spark
    No Coding Plug: R1150 GS ECE Kat
    Yellow Coding Plug: R1150 GS US u.TEV
    Beige Coding Plug: R1150 GS CH o.TEV

    2002 R1150R CA Single Spark
    No Coding Plug: R1150R/GS ECE Kat
    Yellow Coding Plug: R1150R/GS US u.TEV
    Beige Coding Plug: R1150RS/GS CH o.TEV
    Pink Coding Plug: R1150RT ECE/US Kat/T
    30-86 Coding Plug: R1150RT US II Kat/TE
    30-86-87:
    30-86-87a: KEINE SERIE
    30-86-87-87a:

    2002 R1150GS US Single Spark
    No Coding Plug: R1150R/GS ECE Kat
    Yellow Coding Plug: R1150R/GS US u.TEV
    Beige Coding Plug: R1150RS/GS CH o.TEV
    Pink Coding Plug: R1150RT ECE/US Kat/T
    30-86 Coding Plug: R1150RT US II Kat/TE
    30-86-87: R1150 R/GS ECE ROZ91
    30-86-87a: KEINE SERIE
    30-86-87-87a:
    Last edited by roger 04 rt; 01-04-2017 at 11:52 AM.

  5. #5
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Once again Roger, you have gone above and beyond.
    You are a true asset to our community.
    Thank you for your tireless efforts.
    Reto
    '
    Ufda happens..........

    Need your R11xx Hall sensor rewired? PM me.

  6. #6
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Thank you, Roger, this is great stuff!!!

    Now everybody is gonna chime in with "...but I have this plug and it runs just like..."

  7. #7
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    " FOR HE'S A JOLLY GOOD PLUG SLEUTH, FOR HE'S A........"
    '
    Ufda happens..........

    Need your R11xx Hall sensor rewired? PM me.

  8. #8
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    I went back and edited the list to add data taken by GS Addict from a Motronic from a 2002 R1150GS. The variety amazes me.

  9. #9
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    For anyone not familiar with the location of your coding plug:

    Here's a good picture for reference. It also includes a description of which pins to jumper to create a certain plug (e.g. pink is 30-87-87a)

    Last edited by roger 04 rt; 05-30-2015 at 10:51 AM.

  10. #10
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Below is some interpretive information that gives deeper insight into how BMW uses the Coding Plugs. Go back and check the descriptive text strings using the abbreviations.

    This really cements the idea that there are a lot of varieties of Motronics out there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arbreacames
    Nice job, Roger! This is the first time that I see some verifiable information regarding the CCP. It would be nice to learn more about what was intended with the different functions and what the different names mean. I will contribute an incomplete interpretation of some of the information that you documented:
    CH: Switzerland
    ECE: Euro standards
    Kat: catalyitic converter (Katalysator)
    TEV: tank breather valve (Tankentlüftungsventil)
    o.: without (ohne)
    u.: and (und)
    US: United States

  11. #11
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Happy - I installed the GS intake tubes on my '97 1100RT, and did not swap the plug (that was still a "gray" area of tribal knowledge), and I was pleased with the results. The main difference was a small but noticeable torque increase right in the ~4K rpm range, which was eminently useful on the road. No issues with popping on decel, as some have reported; that may just be due to how I had the valves, TPS, & trigger plate set up.
    (Side Note - Many years ago at Marty's, one GS was temporarily given a pair of RS tubes with no plug swap, just to see what would happen - and it immediately got a bad case of the pops. Putting the GS tubes back on cleared it up.)
    I haven't tried this on my 1150 - keep us posted!

  12. #12
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    I have updated the list: http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....l=1#post994823

    Updates include:
    --corrected the phasing of 87 and 87a
    --added data from a U.S. 2002 R1150GS single-spark
    Last edited by roger 04 rt; 06-06-2015 at 05:43 PM.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by roger 04 rt View Post
    For anyone not familiar with the location of your coding plug:

    Here's a good picture for reference. It also includes a description of which pins to jumper to create a certain plug (e.g. pink is 30-87-87a)

    Bringing up an old thread, but I've been looking into CCP charts for my '01 R1100R and found this image discussing the various CCP colors. Right now I have the pink CCP, AF-Xied (to get rid of surge), and a GPR exhaust with O2 sensor still attached. Fuel economy is generally pretty bad (34 mpg today though I was a bit aggressive, but rarely better than 38 in mixed driving). Several other threads here and on Advrider have various opinions on going beige CCP or staying with the pink CCP.

    I have some questions I'd like to get the group's experience on if I may. With the freer flowing exhaust and the Xied, is it safe to keep the pink CCP or should I drop in the beige CCP? I'd really like to improve gas mileage and will give up performance for it, but I'm not willing to accept surging (hence the AF-Xied).

    The other question I have is one I haven't seen addressed anywhere but is in the picture. It lists a grey CCP for low octane fuel. Is it possible to get this grey low octane CCP and use 87 octane without damaging the engine? If I can't get better gas mileage I'd at least like to use cheaper gas.

    Any help is appreciated. Love the bike, not loving the crappy fuel economy.

  14. #14
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Christopher,
    Your fuel mileage is probably not related to your Coding Plug selection. To the best of my knowledge, there are three valid plugs for the R1100R (even though the picture suggests that you can mix and match)

    Pink is stock (30-87-87a): it tells the Motronic that you're riding an R1100R (or GS) and to use the O2 sensor.

    Brown is for Switzerland (30-86-87-87a): it tells the Motronic you're riding an R1100R and to use the O2 sensor, the meaning of "Swiss" is not known.

    Beige is for no catalytic converter (30-87a): an R1100R with no catalytic converter and doesn't reference the O2 sensor (which also means it ignores the AF-XIED).

    Stay with Pink.

    There are several possibilities for your lower mileage and it makes sense to start a new thread. One guy last year with an 1100R found there was a slight residual pressure in his front breaking circuit. In your case, we should check that your AF-XIED is wired in correctly and that your O2 sensor is good.

  15. #15
    Bluenoser
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    BMW R1100S - CCP & Motronic

    Roger

    If you are still following this thread I would like your opinion on the following:

    Bike is a 1999 BMW R1100S, with aftermarket Staintune dual exhaust, no cat converter, has the 02 sensor and I've installed an AFXied for this bike ( last fall ). As the time I had the tank and fairing panels off installing the AFXied wiring, I checked and saw that there was no CCP plug in place. The bike in my view ( owned since May/2016 ) seemed to run lean, therefore I went with installing the AFXied and fashioned up a jumper cable and jumped pins 30 & 87 ( 2&6) on the white plug. This CCP configuration is BMW's choice for the stock bike, with stock exhaust, cat converter & 02 sensor. AFXied is currently set at 7 ( initial recommendation ).

    Over the last year I've read hundreds of posts on the AFXied on BMW bikes and with the R1100S model it is hard to find real specific information. It runs the Motronic 2.4 and in reality is much more similar to the single spark R1150 series of bikes.

    So my question. Would you recommend that I stay with the CCP pinned at 30 and 87 ( which tells the Motronic there is a cat converter ) or should I use the 30 and 87 and 87A pin that from what I've read on the 1150 bikes means there is no cat converter. I realize for the AFXied to work it needs to have an 02 sensor and a CCP. Your thoughts and recommendations would be appreciated. Thanks

    Dave
    1995 R100Rt with Kenna Sidecar, 1986 K100RT

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