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Thread: What kind of "cool vest" do you reccomend?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Veg
    . I'm also impressed by how much coolness those Sharper Image neck coolers (I forget what they call them) deliver, and they run on a 9V battery but I don't know what technology they employ.
    .
    These use evaporative cooling. There is a textile piece on each side which you soak with water and a small fan in the back which forces air down both sides and out exhaust vents in the front. A metal plate on each side crosses your jugular vein and cools the blood. Walking around, they will work for about two hours before you need to add more water. With the ram air effect on a bike at 60 mph, it takes about two minutes before you need to add water.

  2. #17
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    That thermos idea reminds me of the paint-can fuel coolers my hotrodding buddies in high school used to make for their cars, and of the ide-water cooling that turbos at Bonneville use. But that ice water would become hot water quickly in the TexSux heat. Therefore I'm thinking maybe I can rig up some kind of active heat exchange mechanism...
    2012 R1200GS
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  3. #18
    Registered User CJM's Avatar
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    I prefer to keep things simple so all this high-tech cooling vest just passes me by. What I did was buy a First-Gear silver and black summer riding jacket made from ballistic material. It is highly reflective and vented and it is actually cooler than riding with just short sleeve shirts and it is a LOT safer. Cost about $130.00 at the BMW shop and they have matching pants.

  4. #19
    RIDERR1150GSADV
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    Talking Are we Cool or what??

    Well I have to add a little personal experience in this stayin' cool stuff. The single most important thing anyone can do to stay cool is.... hydration.
    And not the kind, sorry. I mean plenty of 50/50 mix water and Gatorade. This will greatly help in your body getting rid of excess heat and keep you from keeling over in the sun.
    I see some of my clients not taking this advice while we are on the boat in 95 F and no wind, drifting around waiting for a fish to bite. Suddenly they don't feel well and get as they have been drinking beer and those godawefull sodas and NO water. Then the trip ends, they're in the pool cooling off and in the A/C for two days and then I have to fish them at night and.....and..
    you get the idea.
    So in addition to a cool-vest just make sure to drink and rest well. After all it is not the destination but the journey .

  5. #20
    USERNAME
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Veg
    That thermos idea reminds me of the paint-can fuel coolers my hotrodding buddies in high school used to make for their cars, and of the ide-water cooling that turbos at Bonneville use. But that ice water would become hot water quickly in the TexSux heat. Therefore I'm thinking maybe I can rig up some kind of active heat exchange mechanism...
    get yourself some lithium bromide and you can make a poor man's air conditioner by sucking the water out of the air. it'll lower the temperature. of course it's expensive as blazes, and you have to buy it from a place in europe, and you'd need a ton of surface area and other equipment to make it closed loop. but it can be used many times over, and it's pretty sweet stuff if the air is dry enough to allow it to work. (LiBr is incredibly hygroscopic.) big D might be too humid for it to work really well. phoenix? you're rockin.

    that's the thing these wet hanky people don't talk too much about, by the way. if youre riding around and the RH is 95%, your wet hanky isn't going to evaporate all that much, it'll just get warm. as we all learned in 3rd grade, the value of the evaporative process is that it requires a ton of energy to change the phase of the water from liquid to vapor (as opposed to merely heating it up - we're talking orders of magnitude here) and the heat flux that such a process drives causes a pretty sweet temperature drop. so in the dry desert, it's amazing, but in really humid climes, well, it's a bit of a wet blanket. (har har!)

    peltier coolers are effective, but in the spirit of humanity imitating nature, a bit ironic. for discussion purposes, a human being at rest can be thought of as the heat equivalent of a 100W light bulb. so let's say you want to stay at your current body temperature - your body must remove 100W. (that's 100 joules per second, quite a bit of energy.) so in order for a peltier to move 100W, and create a "cold side" it must consume much more than 100W, probably on the order of 2.5X, or 250W. so you'd need considerable power to achieve that. they make clothing with peltiers in them i think, and some run on batteries, but they last a very short time, and the energy needed to carry the battery negates the effect of the cooling. making a MC jacket with one might be slick, but you'd want good heat transfer to your skin. basically, you're pumping the heat with one of these devices. much like pumping water (water runs downhill, but with a pump you can push it uphill) heat runs downhill, and to push it back the other way, from a lower temperature to the higher one takes work. so it's not always a straightforward thing to implement. otherwise, we'd all be wearing little suits that kept us at whatever temperature we wanted, all the time.

    i've just said F- it. i live in texas, it's hot during summer. i'm gonna sweat, i'm gonna be nasty. down here, even with mesh gear, if you get into a situation where you're stopped, and it's afternoon and that pavement starts radiating back up at you (sorry, but even the silver outfits have emmissivities high enough to accept significant amounts of heat, especially after you get a thin layer of dust on them from riding (radiation occurs in the top few angstroms of a material) you're going to be sucking up the heat from the road.) you're going to be sweating your arse off. the only way to stay reasonably dry/cool is to be moving. and i've found that if i keep my body nice and cool and dry, my head still sweats like mad in my helmet. when the temperature is above 90, it is what it is and youve just got to do what many others have suggested - drink your water to avoid heat exhaustion. especially if you think youre not overheating - you may be sweating and losing LOTS of water, and not realize it.

    drink up riders! you want nice clear pee. and as a reminder, sing this little song, to the tune of "i can see clearly now, the rain is gone:"

    "i can pee clearly now, my waters gone. i can clear all obstacles in my wayyyyyyyyy!"

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