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Thread: '02 f650gs dakar chain oiler?

  1. #1
    Registered User scoobs's Avatar
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    Question '02 f650gs dakar chain oiler?

    Anyone out there using an automatic chain oiler? Are there any alternatives to the "Scott Oiler" brand? I'm about to invest in a replacement chain and sprockets and am considering fitting an auto oiler to try extend the lifespan.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Ian Robert "Scoobs" Scobie

    '92 K75RT, '02 F650GS Dakar;
    But fondly miss.. R80RT, R45,CB250RS,DT125MX,TS100

  2. #2
    I have also been thinking about adding a chain oiler to my 2003 Dakar when I replace the chain and sprockets. This will probably be at my 18K service, likely next year.

    Here are a couple inexpensive solutions sold by Aerostich:

    Aerostich Chain Oiler Kit $77.60

    Loobman Chain Luber $47.00

    As you know, the Dakar does not come with a center stand (for increased clearance, I assume), which makes it that much more of a pain to maintain the chain.

    I have read about people claiming over 40,000 miles on a chain and sprocket set with an oiler. It would be interesting to hear from people who actually have an oiler on an F650GS to find out what kind of chain life they get. I would be willing to pay the prices above just to have an easy and clean way to oil the chain even if I didn't get any additional chain life.

    As a side note, have you considered changing the tooth count on either sprocket? I have talked to people who have dropped teeth from the rear sprocket to gear the bike a bit higher who say they really like how the bike rides at highway speed with the change.
    Glenn
    2003 F650GS Dakar

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gblawler View Post
    I have also been thinking about adding a chain oiler to my 2003 Dakar when I replace the chain and sprockets. This will probably be at my 18K service, likely next year.

    Here are a couple inexpensive solutions sold by Aerostich:

    Aerostich Chain Oiler Kit $77.60

    Loobman Chain Luber $47.00

    As you know, the Dakar does not come with a center stand (for increased clearance, I assume), which makes it that much more of a pain to maintain the chain.

    I have read about people claiming over 40,000 miles on a chain and sprocket set with an oiler. It would be interesting to hear from people who actually have an oiler on an F650GS to find out what kind of chain life they get. I would be willing to pay the prices above just to have an easy and clean way to oil the chain even if I didn't get any additional chain life.

    As a side note, have you considered changing the tooth count on either sprocket? I have talked to people who have dropped teeth from the rear sprocket to gear the bike a bit higher who say they really like how the bike rides at highway speed with the change.
    How much tooth change on the rear sprocket ?
    '03 R1150R, '03 F650GS, '97DR200SE,'78 Honda CT-90, '77Honda CT-90

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Acejones View Post
    How much tooth change on the rear sprocket ?
    Here are a couple links to past threads:

    http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....246#post639246

    http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....718#post639718

    One thing I have heard is that the stock front sprocket has rubber bonded to it and replacements do not have the rubber; not a good thing. So, I was thinking about dropping 2 teeth from the rear only. The chain gang site has a complete table that shows the RPM changes at given speeds based on dropping teeth.

    I do virtually all riding on the road and most of the miles I put on are on trips, so a lower RPM at highway speed sounded interesting. I talked to a guy at a rally with an F650GS who dropped teeth from the rear and was really happy with the result. A big attraction to this mod is that it probably has zero cost, since you are replacing the sprockets anyway. One warning I have heard is to make sure you get steel sprocket.
    Glenn
    2003 F650GS Dakar

  5. #5
    Registered Loser SHAG's Avatar
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    The 06 Dakar that I bought used and rode for 3 years had a CLS 200 chain oiler on it when I bought it. It worked great!

    http://www.twistedthrottle.com/image...Text=cls%20200

    I also used a 1 tooth larger front sprocket on trips
    Go like hell, You'll get there quicker
    05-GS Rock Red 107k miles
    2013 TW200
    2018 Yamaha X-MAX

  6. #6
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    Another view on chain oilers

    When I purchased my first F650 in 97, I was worried about the chain and installed a Scottoiler. Although it did keep the chain oiled, I found that I was spending about as much time maintaining the oiler as to keep the chain lubed the regular way. Maybe the newer oilers are better, but if they malfunction, your chain isn't getting lubed. I recently picked up an 06 F650 GS with 19k miles, which appears to have the original chain with sprockets and chain in pretty good condition. I do not see a chain oiler in my future.

    Think about spending the money on a center stand, which is useful in many other ways besides lubing the chain...
    John Peck
    Maple City, Michigan
    R1150R
    F650GS

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpeck View Post
    When I purchased my first F650 in 97, I was worried about the chain and installed a Scottoiler. Although it did keep the chain oiled, I found that I was spending about as much time maintaining the oiler as to keep the chain lubed the regular way. Maybe the newer oilers are better, but if they malfunction, your chain isn't getting lubed. I recently picked up an 06 F650 GS with 19k miles, which appears to have the original chain with sprockets and chain in pretty good condition. I do not see a chain oiler in my future.

    Think about spending the money on a center stand, which is useful in many other ways besides lubing the chain...
    I agree. It seems to me that adding an oiler means you are just adding another maintenence item. You're going to be checking on the chain anyway.
    '03 R1150R, '03 F650GS, '97DR200SE,'78 Honda CT-90, '77Honda CT-90

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by jpeck View Post
    I found that I was spending about as much time maintaining the oiler as to keep the chain lubed the regular way.
    I agree that the whole point is to save time and make it quick and easy to oil the chain much more frequently that you would by hand. That is why I am thinking about the cheap and simple solutions in my post #2

    I do not have any experience with the Loobman, but it looks to be about as simple as it could be. As long as the part that makes contact with the rear sprocket lasts long enough.

    I have even thought about making something like Loobman that just drips oil on the chain from directly above. Something that simple would have virtually nothing to go wrong with it. I don't care about having a solution that oils the chain while riding. I would be just as happy with one that just applies the oil while I am sitting on the bike without getting my hands dirty; the equivalent of the oil button on my chainsaw.
    Glenn
    2003 F650GS Dakar

  9. #9
    Sue
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    Chain Oiler DIY

    Maybe try an IV unit from a nurse friend??? I did one and it works OK and had it aimed at the countershaft sprocket. Can clamp the tubing with supplied clamp anywhere enroute and also easy to regulate the drip with the plastic turn wheel gizmo. One drop per minute or less. Each drop is approx. 23 ml. I think I read somewhere for some useless trivia! My ATV fluid reservoir was a simple inverted plastic bottle with a upper hole for filling bunged with a wine carboy bung and a fairly narrow nozzle over which the tubing attaches. Tubing can be easily reduced in circumference down to the skinny IV tubing by putting in inserts with progressively skinnier tubing pieces. Only thing is one has to stop to turn on/off but drip so slow ya need to stop anyway sometimes. ATV seems pretty immune to viscosity changes as temperatures change up or down. No more dirt sticking to change is a plus too.

  10. #10
    BACKROAD.ADV
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    Anyone here ever use a chain oiler for off road/dirt/gravel road applications and how did that work out for you?

    My initial assumption would be, that as the oiler releases oil ---that in a dusty/dirty environment this could really make for a messy situation, gum up the chain, increase wear, increase friction, etc. Since every fresh layer of wet oil put down by the oiler would allow more dirt to adhere to the chain.

    Or am I missing something?

    I'm aware of some very good aerospace industry chain products; that lubricate well, protect against corrosion, reduce friction, and prevent debris from adhering to the chain. But are not cheap!

    On paved roads I have learned that these oilers can work quite well. I had an old 1950s motorcycle with an oiler and the chain was also enclosed,…... and that worked real well….. Until you had to take it all apart.

  11. #11
    SURVIVOR akbeemer's Avatar
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    My wife has a Loobman on her 650 thumper and a Scottoiler on her 650 twin. the Loobman is less finicky and does the job for 1/4 the price. But as the guy who has to maintain her bikes, if I had a chain driven bike I'd not use any sort of oiler. Just another thing to maintain and worry about and oiling a chain is not an onerous task.
    Kevin Huddy
    The Outpost, Silver City, Montana

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