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Thread: Oil Leak - Front Engine Cover

  1. #1
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    Oil Leak - Front Engine Cover

    The bike is a '82 R65LS with ~30k miles. It only gets riden a few hundred miles a year. Started it a couple of days ago and noticed smoke from the bottom of the front engine cover. Shut it down and a drop of oil hit the garage floor. Removed the front cover today and it appears oil is leaking from around the bottom of the ignition trigger unit. May have been leaking for quite some time as a layer of black goo is on the oil pan.

    Looking for suggestions on what must be done to stop the oil leak. And, is this something that can be corrected by an owner with modest mechanical skills?

  2. #2
    Registered User krpntr's Avatar
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    blown seal

    You will need to disassemble the front of the engine to access the timing chain cover. There are two seals ( crankshaft and camshaft) and a gasket you will need to change. Take pictures as you go and pay close attention to the wire connections esp the diode board grounding points. I suggest you also go buy a Clymers manual. There is a lot of information in it for the modestly skilled. A Haynes is not a bad idea either as the Clymer can be a bit wordy. The only tricky part is pulling the rotor. If you have never done it before you will feel like something is about to break just before it pops loose. I Use a hardened steel rod about 1/4' diamiter and about 1 1/2' long. Insert it into the end of the crankshaft where the rotor is mounted and then re-insert the bolt and crank on it. Some gurus like to grind the first inch or two of the threads off a long hardened bolt of matching size. It is important to use a hardened rod because a mild steel bolt will bend under the stress. Before you remove the bean can, mark its location so timing will be easier when you reassemble. And if you heat the timing cover a little (use a hot water soaked towel) the seals will go in easy. The job is simple, but while you'r in there... Hows the timing chain and gears? Your current leak is the camshaft seal but if you don't change the crankshaft seal, it will likely start leaking. Good luck; the job is involved but it can be done. It gets easier if you have a comfortable place to work like a lift platform or a couple of milk crates and a 2x12. Just tie it down so you don't make a big mess.

  3. #3
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    Before doing the timing cover, why not try just replacing the bean can oring first? Might be all that is needed.

  4. #4
    Registered User krpntr's Avatar
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    I knew I was forgetting something. Yes, try the O ring first, but with a lack of use the seals tend to dry out and start to leak. They like to be worked.

  5. #5
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    Thanks

    Thanks for the very detailed advice. With my general lack of courage, I think I'll give the o-ring replacement a go first.

    Not being up to speed on terminology, I assume the "bean can" is the ignition trigger unit?

    Is removal as simple as taking out the two screws?

    Thanks again!

  6. #6
    Registered User krpntr's Avatar
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    yes, but mark its exact location first as there is room to turn it for adjusting the timing.

  7. #7
    Registered User Guenther's Avatar
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    And don't forget to disconnect the battery before you remove the front cover to avoid a short with the diode board underneath.

    /Guenther

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