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Thread: '07 RT Fuel Pump Failure

  1. #1
    Registered User Kenn45's Avatar
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    '07 RT Fuel Pump Failure

    The fuel pump on my RT seized up and the dealer could not get it to turn. They replace the pump and the control module, cleaned and flushed the tank and fuel lines. Inside the tank were flakes of what they described as gold colored foil, some insect parts, and a brown sludge substance. I have never put anything in the tank but gasoline and Stabil during the winter. They said that they have been seeing the sludge in bikes where Stabil had been used and advised against it. All is well now.
    The failure occurred last Friday morning when I pulled it out of the garage to go to work. It just wouldn't start. I used the BMWMOA road service to have it trailered to the dealer. It could have happened on the north shore of Lake Superior or in the middle of the 4000-mile trip I am planning for August. "George just lucky I guess."

  2. #2
    ozonewanderer
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    Did the dealer recommend any particular gas stabilizer?

  3. #3
    Registered User Kenn45's Avatar
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    No he did not.

  4. #4
    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat Omega Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenn45 View Post
    The fuel pump on my RT seized up and the dealer could not get it to turn. They replace the pump and the control module, cleaned and flushed the tank and fuel lines. Inside the tank were flakes of what they described as gold colored foil, some insect parts, and a brown sludge substance. I have never put anything in the tank but gasoline and Stabil during the winter. They said that they have been seeing the sludge in bikes where Stabil had been used and advised against it. All is well now.
    The failure occurred last Friday morning when I pulled it out of the garage to go to work. It just wouldn't start. I used the BMWMOA road service to have it trailered to the dealer. It could have happened on the north shore of Lake Superior or in the middle of the 4000-mile trip I am planning for August. "George just lucky I guess."
    I just cleaned out one of the tanks on one of my small engines-no rust but there was what I describe as "coffee grounds" in the bottom. I'm having a lot of problems with the engines and I have to think it's the ethanol. Also look for a greenish-blackish mold like substance above the filler cap on light colored (especially white) cars. It seems like a new type of mold feeding on the corn.
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  5. #5
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    Greetings Guys,
    I had the fuel pump replaced on my Adventure. Sadly, with less than 6000 miles on it.
    The gents at Bob's BMW -who are always helpful- mentioned how the E10/Ethanol fuels provided less octane, debris from fuel break down, etc. They recommended one brand of fuel treatment by Star brite called StarTron. www.startron.com. I have not found it locally yet. So, I can't give you any ride report details, yet.
    --update: Why I've missed it on local shelves, it's in the Boating/RV sections of most stores.--

    Ron
    Last edited by rstafford; 07-29-2011 at 06:50 PM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by rstafford View Post
    The gents at Bob's BMW -who are always helpful- mentioned how the E10/Ethanol fuels provided less octane, debris from fuel break down, etc.
    Uhhhh, ethanol is an octane BOOSTER. Pure ethanol is about 113 octane. Which just goes to show that an octane rating isn't what people think it is.

  7. #7
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    Gas with etoh is certainly causing lots of troubles in small motors especially those that aren't run dry.(Though previous added oxidizers had their own problems including failure to biodegrade)
    Many of you are probably also boat owners and familiar with the traditional drill for carbureted outboards- pull the fuel line and run the carbs dry when done for the day. Failure to do it used to leave (lead deposits when it was still in use) various junk in the carb that plugged the jets/needle valves or whatever. Many of us did the same type of boat storage drill when putting bikes away for the winter.
    But today most stuff has no way readily to separate the tank and working bits.
    Still, its always good to keep tanks full or totally empty rather than leaving some fuel residue to soak up water and separate.
    Every small engine shop you talk with will tell you that etoh gas is responsible for a lot of their repair work- typically well over half. And of course the geniuses who are "solving" our economic problems subsidize etoh with about $50 billion of your tax dollars despite the undeniable fact that it takes about 3/4 as much petroleum to make it (farm equipment, manufacture, distribution) as corn based etoh can generate- which facts have been understood since the mid 1970s when first published by David Pimentel. Until cellulosic etoh is the norm, another of its biggest effects is simply to add to food prices.

    Not a believer in additives for fuel especially stuff like Stabil. Never use it and have no had any etoh problems in my own stuff, yet, but I sure know a lot of folks who have- mostly in chain saws, trimmers, outboards, etc etc. Many of the problems include degraded fuel line tube or other plumbing made prior to use of etoh in fuel- the lines get brittle and crack...

  8. #8
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by rstafford View Post
    Greetings Guys,
    I had the fuel pump replaced on my Adventure. Sadly, with less than 6000 miles on it.
    The gents at Bob's BMW -who are always helpful- mentioned how the E10/Ethanol fuels provided less octane, debris from fuel break down, etc. They recommended one brand of fuel treatment by Star brite called StarTron. www.startron.com. I have not found it locally yet. So, I can't give you any ride report details, yet.
    --update: Why I've missed it on local shelves, it's in the Boating/RV sections of most stores.--

    Ron
    Contact Milwaukee BMW (Schlossmans) - that's where I get my StarBrite fuel stabilizer - the very same product you mention.

    Hate ethanol!!!

  9. #9
    Addicted to curves azgman's Avatar
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    I toured the southeast before the rally in PA and was able to get Ethanol free gas in a few places. I immediately saw at least a 20% increase in gas mileage. So, if displacing gasoline with ethanol is supposed to be reducing gas consumption, it seems to me that it will need to be at well over a 20% ethanol mix to do so.

    I'm thinking that the people who came up with this plan confused octane with energy, and thought they would get more MPG with the higher octane ethanol.

    It is time to put an end to this BS!
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by BMWPhreak View Post
    I'm thinking that the people who came up with this plan confused octane with energy, and thought they would get more MPG with the higher octane ethanol.
    I'm thinking you don't understand the plan.

    Ethanol use was never intended to reduce gas consumption. That is a fallacy thrown around so often people have come to believe it, including some of the politicians throwing it around. There is a strategic reason for using ethanol: it reduces our need for foreign controlled oil.

    From a strategic point of view a fuel source that you control is better than a fuel source you do not control, even if the fuel in question is not as efficient. Those who think of national grand strategy believe (assuming your 20% difference is correct) that it is better to depend upon 5 barrels of something you control than 4 barrels of something that could theoretically be cut off at any time.

    Does that something have to be ethanol? Probably not. That's where politics and money enter the argument.

  11. #11
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    Marc and others who also believe that line,
    Do take the time to look up how much petroleum it takes to make and distribute ethanol the way it is done in the US. It is a very well known subject and the net energy generation from converting corn to etoh is not so much as many people think- in fact not much at all compared to national energy consumption. Corn is an energy consumptive and not so environmentally crop and using only the corn kernel to make etoh is not at all like various ways to make cellulosic etoh from biomass- but the latter would be even more economically unrealistic given typical US costs.
    Corn based etoh is more an agricultural subsidy to well connected corporate farm interests than big energy generator and that subsidy would almost certainly get cut out of the budget if ordinary citizens had any say in it- as was demonstrated by a recent network news group that asked a bunch of ordinary folks to take a whack at federal spending. One of the first things they did was trim fam subsidies as a wasteful tax loophole.
    Then there is the way CAFE mileages are played with and "subidized" if a car can burn etoh. You may remember that for CAFE purposes one can in effect double the mileage rating of a truck if it can also burn E85 fuel- which is the only reason GM bothered to make same and sell the nationwide (try buying E85 in most of the country). I haven't yet looked at the structure of the 50+ mpg CAFE recently set for the future but I strongly suspect it will play all sorts of silly "credit" games for etoh capability and that there will be no net reduction in gasoline or fuel costs to consumers in real $ (ie market maniuplators from the Saudi to Exxon to whoever will act to preserve their profits) even if actual gasoline mileage goes up greatly.
    Right now food prices here and to 3rd world place we export are increasing dramatically and this is to some extent caused by using corn for vehicle fuel though other factors also contribute.

  12. #12

    Cool fuel pump

    It's hard to believe that the most bullet proof engine around (07 GSA) would have problems in the fuel pump but mine failed too. The problem was centered in the electronic component of the pump. The pump would fail- work -fail - work especially at slow speeds. BMW fixed it.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by racer7 View Post
    Marc and others who also believe that line,
    Do take the time to look up how much petroleum it takes to make and distribute ethanol the way it is done in the US.
    Yes. Apparently you ignored my last statement, so I'll repeat it again:

    Does that something have to be ethanol? Probably not. That's where politics and money enter the argument.

    There is a strategic reason for using LOCALY CONTROLLED FUEL SOURCES. No where is it stated that for strategic reasons such a source must be ethanol produced from corn. Corn ethanol in fuel has everything to do with politics and money.

  14. #14
    Addicted to curves azgman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    I'm thinking you don't understand the plan.

    Ethanol use was never intended to reduce gas consumption. That is a fallacy thrown around so often people have come to believe it, including some of the politicians throwing it around. There is a strategic reason for using ethanol: it reduces our need for foreign controlled oil.

    From a strategic point of view a fuel source that you control is better than a fuel source you do not control, even if the fuel in question is not as efficient. Those who think of national grand strategy believe (assuming your 20% difference is correct) that it is better to depend upon 5 barrels of something you control than 4 barrels of something that could theoretically be cut off at any time.

    Does that something have to be ethanol? Probably not. That's where politics and money enter the argument.
    But isn't only 10% of the volume "under our control"? Therefore, a 20% decrease in gas mileage actually increases the dependency on foreign oil?
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  15. #15
    Registered User texanrt's Avatar
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    In Houston, they were looking for a substitute for MTBE and decided on ethanol as a more "environmentally friendly" oxygenate for reformulated gasolines required in our area. MTBE leaks from gasoline station tanks and the resulting ground-water contamination were big news in the Houston area a few years back.
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