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Thread: Any Moto Ref's?

  1. #1
    Registered User MWS's Avatar
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    Any Moto Ref's?

    Lynn and I are going to get our usacycling certification next weekend.

    We have done local stuff for thr last three years, but I'm not sure what to expect when we are "Certified".

    Sorry guys, I am so new to this I don't know what even to ask!
    Tip would be welcome!
    Mark

  2. #2
    Registered User LMIWA156120's Avatar
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    We'll be very glad to have you joining our ranks!

    I've been a USAC motoref for a few years now and enjoy it immensely. Feel free to contact me if would like any info or just want to swap stories.

    And for anyone else that's interested, we can always use more good motorefs!
    Loch Miwa
    Galway, Ireland
    2006 R1200GS

  3. #3
    Registered User dadayama's Avatar
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    So what is a MotoRef? I know it has to do with bicycles, but if you don't mind me being nosy could you tell us about it?

    Peter in okc,ok

  4. #4
    Registered User widebmw's Avatar
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    This is a link to the Motoref Manual, a PDF
    Its 106 pages.

    http://www.usacycling.org/forms/rules/04_motoref.pdf

  5. #5
    Registered User MWS's Avatar
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    Thanks Widebmw,
    I missed that on the their website.
    This will really help us for the first step!
    Mark

  6. #6
    Registered User gsrider05's Avatar
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    I was in contact with usacycling last year and was told that I would be contacted this year to get involved. I have not heard anything yet.
    I have done several local races with the local organizations down in South Florida and would like to expand and do more races. It is a great thing to get paid to ride a motorcycle!!!

    Maybe I should check in with my contact and see where I stand in the process. I must have been forgotten...
    2011 BMW R1200RT - 2013 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic Limited
    2005 BMW GS (Gone)
    BMWMOA# 154903
    Danny

  7. #7
    tbourque
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    Quote Originally Posted by widebmw View Post
    This is a link to the Motoref Manual, a PDF
    Its 106 pages.

    http://www.usacycling.org/forms/rules/04_motoref.pdf

    Thanks for the link. Our local chamber of commerce put on a 100-mile bicycle ride (along with 24- 40- and 64-mile rides) last year for the first time. It was a huge success and we will have it again this August.

    I gathered several of my motorcycle riding friends (mostly BMW riders - the cyclists were adamant about not having HDs; too loud!) and we helped monitor the course. 200+ miles later in an all day rain, we gathered for a debriefing. All went well and we helped several stranded cyclists and assisted some cash victims. Foretunately we teamed up with our local group of HAM operators who were extremely invaluable (mobile service is often sporadic here in the Smoky Mtns). I highly recommend to anyone having an event like this to team up with these folks - they are great and provide excellent communications. The motorefs were able to get back to the HAM locations much quicker than the SAG vehicles and summons help when needed. We did help direct some traffic, but that was a minor part of our day. This year we expect maybe double the amount of cyclists and our job will be much more critical.

    This manual should provide a lot of direction I did not have last year.

  8. #8
    Registered User MWS's Avatar
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    Yes, a big help.
    From what I understand that manual is what we are going over in class and being tested on Saturday to get the Class C licence.
    I am suprised to see that they really don't test your ability to handle a motorcycle to get started.
    You are evaluated and then recomended by an experience Motoref before going to the next level after so many races under your belt, at least that is the way I understand the process.
    Mark

  9. #9
    Registered User LMIWA156120's Avatar
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    Starting out as a Cat C moto is pretty easy. First, you have to become a Cat C official (8hrs class, open book test). Then, (often the next day) you take the Cat C motoref course and exam. The exam is a little tougher, but most people pass.

    Then each year, USAC requires that you submit your info (and $$) for a traffic violation background check. The reason for this is that USAC offers liability insurance for moto's when they're working a race. USAC does not officially test riding skills because they are not in the business of "certifying" riding skills - they only certify officiating skills.

    I'm sure each area has it's own method for screening riders. At a minimum, we look for attendance at an MSF course within the last few years. Many of our officials are MSF instructors (I'm not - no time to do both). We also either already know the person from riding together, or we get to know them (and their riding). If other motoref's in the area feel they are safe, they will usually be assigned an "easy" race - less challenging course, fewer riders - to start out with.

    After working a number of races of different types, passing an exam, and being evaluated in a race setting by a Category A motoref, you can then upgrade to Category B.

    Upgrading is not required. Many officials stay at the C level. Upgrading does not increase your pay (oh by the way, NOBODY makes a living as an official!). What it does do is allow you to work larger races and possibly work outside your local area.

    Finally, Cat A officials are the ones you will see working races like the Tour of California and UCI (international) events. They will also be the head motos at NRC (national level) events. These are the motorefs that have years (decades) of experience and have proven themselves in challenging situations.

    So why would anyone want to become a motoref? If you enjoy bicycle racing, there is no better place to watch a race unfold than on a moto!
    Loch Miwa
    Galway, Ireland
    2006 R1200GS

  10. #10
    Club President HankPfister's Avatar
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    Moto Ref'n

    I started out Moto-Marshalling, or escorting at some local bicycle races several years ago. I was encouraged by some race promoters to get my Class C moto ref which I did. Moto Ref'n can be tough work on a hot day with lots of racing going on, or a very rainy day. But I find it fun, especially at the end of the event and I get paid for riding! The racers always are appreciative because of the added safety of having motos out front,.
    Hank Pfister
    Copper Hill, VA
    pfestus1@yahoo.com
    2007 R1200GS, 1973 R75/5/Dnepr, 1984 R100RS/Motovation.
    www.twinvalleyriders.com

  11. #11
    Danger: Keep Back 500 Ft FredRydr's Avatar
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    I'm a moto-ref as well. I was recruited by a moto-commissaire and attended the first moto-ref seminar in DC, and I keep my license going, but honestly, I prefer moto-marshaling duties for larger races. Had I come from a bicycle racing background, I might be more into the refereeing side.

    Anyone doing Altoona?

    Fred

  12. #12
    Club President HankPfister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FredRydr View Post
    I'm a moto-ref as well. I was recruited by a moto-commissaire and attended the first moto-ref seminar in DC, and I keep my license going, but honestly, I prefer moto-marshaling duties for larger races. Had I come from a bicycle racing background, I might be more into the refereeing side.

    Anyone doing Altoona?

    Fred
    I feel the same as FredRyder, Marshalling is more "fun", reff'n is a bit more serious, and not having a background in racing bicycles is a disadvantage. There are LOTS of rules, and a ref must have a pretty good understanding of them, and when to enforce them.
    Hank Pfister
    Copper Hill, VA
    pfestus1@yahoo.com
    2007 R1200GS, 1973 R75/5/Dnepr, 1984 R100RS/Motovation.
    www.twinvalleyriders.com

  13. #13
    Registered User MWS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HankPfister View Post
    I feel the same as FredRyder, Marshalling is more "fun", reff'n is a bit more serious, and not having a background in racing bicycles is a disadvantage. There are LOTS of rules, and a ref must have a pretty good understanding of them, and when to enforce them.
    And How!
    We did the first step Saturday. The guys in the class that have raced seemed to have gotten around the rule book a lot easier. That was the first time Lynn and I ever saw the rule book, so we were at a disadvantage from the get-go.

    The cycling rule book is layed out very.......interesting shall I say.
    Thank goodness it was an open book test, and we still had a stuggle.

    Next step is Morgantown WV. in late June for the Moto Ref class.
    Mark

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