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Thread: 2006 R1200RT ABS brake bleeding

  1. #1
    kmkahuna
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    2006 R1200RT ABS brake bleeding

    I've checked the forum, but no one seems to have tackled this issue yet: As I was finishing up the big stuff on a 40km check (oil, final drive, transmission, spline lube, valve adjustment), I started going down the list and noticed the brake inspection. So, being the idealistic, naive mechanic I am, I thought "hey, I'll just bleed the old fluid out".
    You know the rest of the story....
    Even with an airtight seal on the caliper bleed valve, air is being sucked into the system somewhere...
    Now, the rear circuit of the ABS system is empty. How this happened is a mystery. Also a mystery is this: if you apply a vacuum on the rear caliper bleed valve, it's as if you're sucking on a straw: air just gets sucked all the way through the system. Where is this air coming from??? Why is a closed loop system allowing air into itself?
    Anyway, the handy CD ROM is out, and will bleed the ABS rear circuit, now that my beautiful bike is in pieces all over the garage: the tupperware, the fuel tank, etc...
    My question is: does this solve the problem? I will bleed out the ABS rear circuit per the instructions on the CD ROM, and do the same with the normal rear brake reservoir .. Also, is there a good homemade filler system that replaces that BMW specific attachment that goes on the ABS fill valve?

    BTW: the hexhead tech section is just awesome: all the other stuff went like clockwork thanks to this forum.
    I will try this procedure as my last gasp on trying to solve air in an ABS bike and if it doesn't work, I will cry uncle and bring in the calvary...at a BMW shop.

  2. #2
    Your use of "rear" confuses me as there are two rear circuits (wheel and control). Which were you trying to bleed? Also, you don't need to apply vacuum to the caliper. The electro-servo assist makes a wonderful pump.

    I'm wondering if you opened the rear reservoir for the control circuit then bled the caliper.

    If so all you did was bleed the wheel circuit reservoir that is part of the ABS unit dry.

  3. #3
    kmkahuna
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Your use of "rear" confuses me as there are two rear circuits (wheel and control). Which were you trying to bleed? Also, you don't need to apply vacuum to the caliper. The electro-servo assist makes a wonderful pump.

    I'm wondering if you opened the rear reservoir for the control circuit then bled the caliper.

    If so all you did was bleed the wheel circuit reservoir that is part of the ABS unit dry.
    I was trying to bleed the wheel circuit. Filled up the reservoir under the seat and opened the bleed valve on the caliper. Did I drain the control circuit as I pumped the rear pedal? I didn't mess with the control circuit at all; didn't fill it, or put fluid in it.

  4. #4
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    You need to print this & take it with you to the garage. Follow it front to rear & you will be good!

    http://advwisdom.hogranch.com/Wisdom/service_abs3.pdf
    John.

  5. #5
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    +1 on John's post above. I did exactly that on my 06 and bled all per spec. No problems. You will need about 36 ounces of Dot 4 brake fluid (I used three 12oz cans).
    Last edited by MPMARTY; 04-29-2011 at 04:39 PM. Reason: punctuation
    Marty - in the western Oregon mountains.'06RT, (gone '04RT, '86 Venture Royal, '81 Yamaha Virago920, '82Suzuki GS1100GK, '76 Suzuki GT750, Triumph 750 Bonneville, BSA Road Rocket 650, 61" Harley knucklehead)

  6. #6
    What John said, except after cleaning and pushing the caliper pistons into the caliper I use some shims between the brake pads instead of replacing the pads with custom hardwood spacers used in the referenced document.

    No need to pump. Light pressure on the brake pedal will cause the servo to come on. A little more pressure will cause fluid to start moving. Fluid will move as long as that pressure is maintained. Keep your eye on the funnel (I assume you're using a funnel) and close the bleed valve while you still see some brake fluid. I use a syringe to suck out excess fluid before removing the funnel.

  7. #7
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    I use two turkey basters (clean and dirty) for fluid removal per the instructions. Use a glass turkey baster if possible to avoid problems with brake fluid attacking the baster tube.
    Marty - in the western Oregon mountains.'06RT, (gone '04RT, '86 Venture Royal, '81 Yamaha Virago920, '82Suzuki GS1100GK, '76 Suzuki GT750, Triumph 750 Bonneville, BSA Road Rocket 650, 61" Harley knucklehead)

  8. #8
    No turkey baster I've seen will reach here.



    I like stopping the flush when I can still see fluid. I also like to remove excess fluid before removing the funnel so it doesn't drip down the center of the bike.

  9. #9
    kmkahuna
    Guest

    Thank you!

    You guys rock.
    Thank you very much for the pdf. Isn't it funny: I just went through 7 months of rebuilding an airhead and tried my best to follow this process:
    1. Identify the task.
    2. Research the Clymers and exisiting forum articles.
    3. ASK FOR HELP!
    4. Put on the Nitrile gloves, break out the tools and let the parts and fastners fly...

    I shake my head in bemused wonder at how often I blaze right by #3 and just go into the garage with torx and wrenches flying....
    Thanks again; will attempt this job after a weekend away from the mancave.
    Oh, last question...is DOT3 okay? If not, now that I know what to do, it's pretty easy to flush it out...

    K

  10. #10
    Rally Rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmkahuna View Post
    You guys rock.

    Oh, last question...is DOT3 okay? If not, now that I know what to do, it's pretty easy to flush it out...

    K

    Seriously? Uh....NO.....DOT4

  11. #11
    kmkahuna
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    Quote Originally Posted by kctay View Post
    Seriously? Uh....NO.....DOT4
    Found this on bimmerfest: good overview.
    http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=337087

    BTW: I've found on these forums that no question is a dumb question, since there are so many others who benefit from the discussion and mistakes we all make. I'll drain out the DOT3 I put in the rear system next week.

  12. #12
    kmkahuna
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    Whew!

    Finished the ABS brake bleed, and replaced the brake pads as well tonight. Usually, I take a lot of photos with these projects, but with the hexhead, the tech forum has the pictures and the handout posted earlier in this thread has everything you need to get back on the road. Can't recommend it enough, made it really easy.
    The only thing I did differently is that I just put the new pads on and re-installed them vice using wood blocks. Don't know if that would make any difference: it seemed to make sense, right? The new pads are the distance that is needed anyway...

    Thanks again to everyone who helped out: that handout is just the bee's knees..
    Bike runs great, brakes are fine, and I'm finished with my 24,000 service except for hooking it up and checking the fault values (I do not have the tool...)

  13. #13
    kmkahuna
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    2006 R1200RT torx-45 torque value: rear brake caliper

    Got off the Interstate last night and my bike locked up at a red light. after forcing it off the road and smelling that wonderful metallic brake smell, I noticed the rear caliper pushed up at an unnatural angle: the rear torx bolt had come out somewhere on the road and I can only be thankful this didn't happen to me on the road going 70 mph.

    I am quite confident I followed the guidance torqueing these bolts down at 24nm,
    http://forums.bmwmoa.org/showthread....t=torque+brake

    or 18 ft/lbs, which in retrospect, seems quite low.
    Pretty shaken by the close call....I don't feel very confident of that value now, or maybe my memory with the damn torque wrench. Can you guys confirm, or tell me what values you use?

  14. #14
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    I follow the exact torque specs from the site here on maintenance. My torque wrenches read in Newton Meters as well as in foot pounds.
    Marty - in the western Oregon mountains.'06RT, (gone '04RT, '86 Venture Royal, '81 Yamaha Virago920, '82Suzuki GS1100GK, '76 Suzuki GT750, Triumph 750 Bonneville, BSA Road Rocket 650, 61" Harley knucklehead)

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by kmkahuna View Post
    I am quite confident I followed the guidance torqueing these bolts down at 24nm, ...
    Yep, 24 Nm for the rear caliper bolts, 30 Nm for the front. Dry.

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