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Thread: Stripped Allen Screw /5 seat hinge

  1. #1
    Rally Rat
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    Stripped Allen Screw /5 seat hinge

    Man oh man, those screws are hard to get to when swapping seats. Stripped one BIG Time, and could use some suggestions for removal. The head of the Allen screw is flush in the seat hinge, and there's not a lot of room to work!
    Last edited by woodrow823; 01-30-2011 at 01:29 AM.

  2. #2
    TravelsWithBarley.com
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    I've had very good luck with those reverse thread screw extractors. I got mine from Sears, cost about $20 for a set of six different sizes, and have used them several times.
    '18 R1200GSA for solo rides
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  3. #3
    Registered User kgadley01's Avatar
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    Get a set of easyouts. drill a hole in the center of the screw or bolt. then insert the correct size easyout for the hole you drilled. It should come out. It helps if you soak it overnight with Blaster or some other penetrate.
    AKA SNAPGADGET
    Lifes too short to ride an ugly Motorcycle

  4. #4
    pi variables
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    They are quite difficult to get to. If you can loosen one of the hook hinges then you can slip the seat off. I rounded most of mine, but was able to remove the seat by loosening one of the hooks. Once off the bike I drilled them out and re-tapped them.

    Not easy to get the seat off.

    Pi Variables.

  5. #5
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    Pi V.
    I thought about that, and guess what? I now have one stripped in both hinges, on the bottom. I'll try the easyout or reverse thread I suppose, but I'm not I can in there close enough to get enough torque.

    Guess the Russel will have to wait.

  6. #6
    If you're inclined to go to a "lift off" seat configuration, the seat hinges cease to be an issue. Here's a link someone posted on the forum by Duane A.:
    http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/seatmod/index.htm

    The seat without hinges is solid and stable and you won't have to remove side bags, (Krausers), or other luggage to get to your tool tray and stuff. I did this and wish I had done it long ago.

    For the current bolt removal, I'd drill a small hole near the edge of bolt head and drive the screw out with a punch.
    Bob in Indy
    '08 K12LT "Elvira"
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by woodrow823 View Post
    Pi V.
    I thought about that, and guess what? I now have one stripped in both hinges, on the bottom. I'll try the easyout or reverse thread I suppose, but I'm not I can in there close enough to get enough torque.

    Guess the Russel will have to wait.
    You may not need much torque. Drilling out the center seems to loosen stuck bolts. I have occasionally had them come out when I reversed the drill to ease the bit out.
    '61 Clubman's Gold Star, '13 690 Duke, '13 Daytona 675R, '18 Street Triple RS, 2020 R1250R (gone but not forgotten: '76 R75/6, '84 R100, '76 R90S)

  8. #8
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    or some other penetrate.
    Kroil



    I tried the "punch" method on my /5. When that didn't work (further mangling the screw head) I considered trying to Dremel out the conical "flat head" part of the screw but didn't have the patience for the job. That area is such a pain in the butt to get a Dremel into (or almost anything for that matter). I was burning a short fuse that afternoon anyway, finally went ballistic, and cut off the loop of the back bracket...

    When I reinstalled the seat, yes.... with a new bracket (from Hucky's ($$$)), I chased the threads, used stainless socket-heads screws, with a liberal smear of anti-seize, and used a ball-end Allen wrench. I considered using Phillips head screws but socket heads stand torquing better and don't "cam out" as easily. The ball-end set has become a permanent addition to my tool roll.

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden
    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner
    1963 Dnepr

  9. #9
    Registered User kgadley01's Avatar
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    +1 on the Anti-seize...
    AKA SNAPGADGET
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  10. #10
    Registered User JB1982RT's Avatar
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    I have drilled off the head, pulled off the hinge and used vice grips to unscrew what is left.

  11. #11
    Plenty of good advice above. Several techniques will work.

    I prefer straight fluted screw extactors - tap, tap into the recess and turn to remove.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  12. #12
    Simpleman
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    I guess I'm "old school" and use the easy out method that I was taught 30 years ago in the USAF. Hmmm maybe I should try the new tools that have been invented in the last 10 years. I was an Airframe mechanic and part of my job was to remove stripped bolts on the aircrafts that someone else did (you know who you are).
    Last edited by 68159; 02-02-2011 at 01:39 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 104571 View Post
    I have drilled off the head, pulled off the hinge and used vice grips to unscrew what is left.
    +1 on that one.

    I would drill through the screw just under the tap drill size before drilling the hd off to relieve some pressure.
    '81 R80G/S(wp4860 forks, Henderson triple clamp)
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  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by 68159 View Post
    I guess I'm "old school" and use the easy out method that I was taught 30 years ago in the USAF. Hmmm maybe I should try the new tools the have been invented in the last 10 years. I was an Airframe mechanic and part of my job was to remove stripped bolts on the aircrafts that someone else did (you know who you are).
    My problem with the traditional EZOut brand left spiral extractors is that they are sufficiently tapered that you need to drill a fairly deep hole to get them not to bottom out. Thus my preference for the straight flutes that are barely tapered at all.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    My problem with the traditional EZOut brand left spiral extractors is that they are sufficiently tapered that you need to drill a fairly deep hole to get them not to bottom out. Thus my preference for the straight flutes that are barely tapered at all.
    Paul, to add to this discussion, I'll say that the brand I use(spiral flutes and USA good stuff) doesn't have that problem. Not a"brand thing" as they chose me not vice versa, as they were a part of the tools provided when I served an apprenticeship in the 1960's. Cannot remember the brand but mentioned them in a previous "remove a bolt thread". Also, I'll say again that left hand drill sets can do the trick and should be in a serious mechanics bag of tricks.Far more effective than reversing your drill. The smaller sizes of most extractors are subject to breakage from the hardened steel necessary but not usually a problem if you use some caution and don't "Fred Flintstone" the tool.
    Check out ebay, there are plenty of extractors and they vary . Pass up the Chinese ones as this is a tool for serious work .

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