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Thread: Interesting article from the BBC

  1. #1
    Rally Rat YB in IN's Avatar
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    Interesting article from the BBC


  2. #2
    RIDERR1150GSADV
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    Unhappy Biker Bambi????

    Well although age wise I might have fit in that box they featured, I refuse to be called a 'biker' I am a motorcyclist. There is a difference i.e I don't drink 'budwiper' and go bar hopping on a loud bike wearing a 'cool' skullcap
    I started riding because I finally can afford it, and am single, so no home front to deal with either. Biker Bambi?? Eeeeeeeeeeewwwww!! . For some it may apply , but not for everyone.

    I vented there , and now here too
    Happy now.....

  3. #3
    SNC1923
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    The article cuts a little close to home for me. I'm not in a midlife crises (I had a quarter life crisis twenty years ago). I've been away from biking for 15 years and just got back in because I could now afford a new BMW. I'm 43.

    But I have to admit, I'm a bit unsteady, have had a few close calls, and am far more nervous and sheepish than I was at 25.

    I just signed up for an ERC in April and am glad I'm taking it. I've learned the hard way (only close calls so far) that I have to ride MY ride, not follow too close, not look at the ground in a corner, etc. There's a lot to know about riding a bike and I know I have a lot to learn.

    I was suprised to learn that my age bracket is the highest fatality rate going. I'm certain it is due to the ever-incresing size of bikes and horsepower, the popularity of not only Harley Davidson but its "outlaw" rider culture, and that we (Boomers) are a large and expanding age group.

    The article (in spite of its shortcomings) highlights important information for people like me. I bought a beemer and joined the MOA precisely because I was interested in safety and learning from a fraternity of more experienced riders. So far, I have not been disappointed--far from it. Hopefully this info will save lives, not the least of which will be mine.

  4. #4
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
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    If you look at the stats a bit closer, you will find that most of the accidents are at night, single vehicle, no helmet, and alcohol involved. The amount of alcohol related accidents in the geezer range is 3 times that of the younger crowd. Seems like the outlaw posers are the ones doing most of the crashing, not the motorcyclists who take it seriously.
    Gale Smith
    2009 Versys
    1999 R1100RT

  5. #5
    James.A
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    Personally, I only quit for 4 years. In 1983 I sold my BSA for a months rent on a 3 room cabin, and In 1987 I found an R50/5 for sale for $500. The "LEAN" years. I lived on powdered milk and pot pies back then. I had 2 low speed crashes on the BSA when I was in my 20's. I think it has been an advantage to have been continuously riding for the last 17 years.

  6. #6
    Rally Rat TZOLK's Avatar
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    Poor Charlie!

  7. #7
    Minnesota Nice! braddog's Avatar
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    I was one...

    I took off approximately 19-20 years. There are some things that you remember, and other skills that are completely gone. Let's face it, you've got to "relearn" a bit, even if you take a winter break from riding.

    I haven't really crashed since I returned to riding 5 years ago, but the possibility is always there.

    Be careful with statistics, though, they can be presented anyway the writer wants to make his point. There are always multiple factors, as mentioned in other posts in this thread.
    -----------------------------------------
    Brad D. - Member #105766
    '77 R100RS - Black Beauty (big pipe, baby!)
    '94 R1100RS - Sylvia

  8. #8
    Scootertrash
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    Statistics don't lie, but statisticians do...

  9. #9
    SNC1923
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    I believe that it was British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli that said, "There are lies, damned lies, and statistics."

  10. #10
    Motoring Malcontent ScottM's Avatar
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    OK -- I fit.

    Was out for 25 years. Military-family-money. The later was because of the former. Now I have the time and money to once again enjoy something I couldn't afford to do when I was young and dumb.

    I've have a couple of close ones. One my fault, hit a corner a little too hot and slipped the rear wheel. Learned that day to stay off that lever as much as possible. Second was a bimbo who turned if front of me. Found out the swerve technique really works that I was taught in MSF course.

    I'm older, slower, and hopefully smarter than when I was young. The danger and possibility of crashing is always there. We can lessen the chance through training, practice and attentioin. But then again maybe that is why we ride. It has put a thrill back into my life.
    2002 R1150R (Black)

  11. #11
    Rally Rat tommyH's Avatar
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    i agree with most of the artical - i have been riding over 40 years - never been down (on the paved road) but that doesn't mean i might crash this afternoon or tomorrow or next week - i try to ride with caution - i don't think i'm scared of motorcycles but i respect the hell out of them & they are a passion for me - i work hard at trying to keep an eye on the other guy out there - many times they just don't see us - at 58 years old and over 40 years of riding i bought my 1st full face helmet a couple of weeks ago - a flip up - so far i think i will be able to it in the summer heat? - i not a fan of the Iron Butt Assoc. - which i have been flamed and BBQ'd over - i think way to many riders buy into the hype - but i have always said it's their life they are playing with - unless they crash and take out asomeone walking down the road? - I am a fan of the Adventure Rider - i respect the hell out of guys who ride around the world on a dem motorcycle - i'd wear out driving a luxury SUV let along a bike - Motorcycles are a way of life for allot of folks - rich people & poor people & everywhere inbetween & we have many great choices out there as far as what we ride - tommy

  12. #12
    On the Road
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    Well, It looks like I might have found another label to pin on my shirt. Bambi it is kinda discerning to find that you fall in to a class with a bad rap like this one. But I always thought if you go into something with your eyes wide open. You can steer away from some of the pitfuls.
    But luckily I was wise enough read books from David L. Hough. and I did do the beginners MSF course last year. before I really started to do some riding, and the instructors were able to point out a few of my mistakes and help me break them before I turned them into really bad habits. But I'm gald I finally was able to buy my used 97 R1100RT. I found motorcycling to be very fun and very enjoyable. I have seen more of this great State this last summer then I have in the last ten years. But I even get a bonus now I can pin another label on my shirt since the announcement of the new 1200RT I can say I own a Classic Oilhead

  13. #13
    Rally Rat Grey_Matter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorazepam
    If you look at the stats a bit closer, you will find that most of the accidents are at night, single vehicle, no helmet, and alcohol involved. The amount of alcohol related accidents in the geezer range is 3 times that of the younger crowd. Seems like the outlaw posers are the ones doing most of the crashing, not the motorcyclists who take it seriously.
    What he said...

  14. #14
    Registered User jgr451's Avatar
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    Interesting...
    In my case,I have ben riding street bikes continuously since I was 19.There have been periods of months only since then,that I have not had a bike.However,my current bike,K1200GT,has ferociously more power =killyaifyoure not paying attention, than any bike I have ever had before.

    It does make me humble and a bit afraid:I used to struggle to make 100 mph,now it is almost nonchalant;but at that speed,things happen very quickly,so ahead vision,attention and anticipation need to be that much more acute;just when reflexes and eyesight etc are starting to decline.

    So I try to be very aware of my own limitations and mortality,while having just as much crazy fun as I possibly can.

    I know,it makes no sense at all.
    Sometimes,nothing is a real cool hand.

  15. #15
    Rally Rat tommyH's Avatar
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    I know,it makes no sense at all.

    ************************************

    might not make sense but i think all of us here know what your saying - a good friend of mine just got a new K1200GT - i haven't rode it yet but he says it's it's awsome!

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