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Thread: Clearcoat Snowflake Rim?

  1. #1
    "Enthusiast" King's Avatar
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    Clearcoat Snowflake Rim?

    Back in the 1980s I had the wheels on one of my 320i's painted and clear coated. That made it much easier to keep the wheels clean. I'm thinking of doing the same thing for my '81 RS... clear coat the snowflake rims. Has anyone tried this?
    Don Braasch # 9049
    2003 K1200RS 1981 R100RS
    1974 R75 "S" 1977 R60/7

  2. #2
    Jammess jammess's Avatar
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    Had my snowflakes powder coated and they look great and clean up nice. I chose an aluminum color. No clear coat necessary with powder coat.
    Jammess

    '93 R1100RSL, '10 FJR1300A
    MOA # 50714

  3. #3
    Vern 12907's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red100RT View Post
    Had my snowflakes powder coated and they look great and clean up nice. I chose an aluminum color. No clear coat necessary with powder coat.
    Ditto.
    Have fun & Ride safe, Anthony
    '83 R100RS
    '03 GL1800A
    '99 KLR 250

  4. #4
    copandengr
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    Clearcoat

    I've clearcoated many aluminum items over the years, ranging from rims to a rotary Mazda engine. It works very well and cleaning the parts later is very easy, as oil and other crud will not get into the pores of the metal and stain it.

    I am partial to DuPont products, and use either Imron or Chrome A Clear. The Imron is very expensive because of the catalyst. The Base/Clear system is less expensive, but just as durable.

  5. #5
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    DITTO- no reason to powder coat a rim when you can shoot it with a silver base coat and clear it at home or in any body shop! If you want to hear how it stands up, I have used auto clear coat on golf drivers and it will also make a great bar top finish on wood. Powder coats are over rated in my book, but the biggest issue for me is, I have to pay somebody else to get it done. Even the wheel refinish industry doesn't use it and they have a choice to go either way for the best process.

  6. #6
    Rally Rat
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    Powder coats are usually pretty thick and chip easily, this can be a big problem when changing tires unless you are very careful. A repair on the road and careful usually do not go together.

    Dupont Imron is very tough, the fumes are deadly, so I would not mess with it but some with proper equipment can apply it for you. Most other clear coats are tough also. I would avoid powder coating.

    Rod

  7. #7
    Sir Darby Darryl Cainey's Avatar
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    Gold Wheels

    I picked up a set of Snowflakes on Fleabay and will get them powdercoated over the winter.
    The place I found will give them a light blast with glass beads, mask off the areas that don't get paint and will powdercoat them gold for $65 per wheel.

    This should go well with my Viper Red R100RS with gold pinstripes..

    I am going to get the wheels sealed on the inside and convert them over to tubeless.
    Ambassador Emeritus BMW MOA Ontario Canada
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    Knights of the Roundel #333
    1977 R100RS, (Retired) 1993 R100GS

  8. #8
    Yarddog
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
    Powder coats are usually pretty thick and chip easily, this can be a big problem when changing tires unless you are very careful. A repair on the road and careful usually do not go together.

    Dupont Imron is very tough, the fumes are deadly, so I would not mess with it but some with proper equipment can apply it for you. Most other clear coats are tough also. I would avoid powder coating.

    Rod
    All powder coating is is another method of applying paint! Nothing magical about it, and no real advantage to the end user until you get into the mil spec or higher end applications. The advantage of powder coating is to the manufacturer of the part...you are able to finish the product faster, dry it out, and get it down the line much faster than conventional paints.

    The advantage of standard automotive finishes to the hobbyist is that many of us are already pretty much set up to apply them, as long as we have an air compressor, paint guns, etc...and different shades and types of finishes are relatively easy to find. I have never powder coated because I'm very well set up to apply automotive finishes, therefore there is NO advantage to powder coating for me.

    Powder coatings do chip, I'm not certain whether more or less than automotive finishes. My applications don't normally chip because I'm using higher end product and methods, and I make sure that I use good quality self-etching primer on bare metal, and prep the finishes between processes. Those who do not, those who skip necessary steps, or use crap products like rattle cans, will not experience this. They will consider powder coating to be a superior method compared to what they are putting on, which will be true...not because PC is so good, it's because what they are doing is so bad!!

    If one is not set up or experienced in applying automotive finishes, then I think that sourcing a powder coating shop is a good choice. Honestly, it takes thousands of dollars to buy good quality stuff, and although some of the Harbor Freight stuff is good, if you're going to invest in something like this, it should be better quality than that. So, the price savings is gone.

    I've written a lot on this in the past, as have others, this is another one of those beaten to death subjects, but here we go again...

  9. #9
    Scraper JohnW67's Avatar
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    I think I would consider anodizing them for a more durable finish.
    John Woods
    1976 R60/6

  10. #10
    Sir Darby Darryl Cainey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOHNW67 View Post
    I think I would consider anodizing them for a more durable finish.
    I had 2 sets of annodized rims bought new a they both faded.

    Tired of tubes, loose spokes , missing spokes and cleaning issues!
    Last edited by Darryl Cainey; 10-22-2010 at 05:16 PM. Reason: spelling
    Ambassador Emeritus BMW MOA Ontario Canada
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    1977 R100RS, (Retired) 1993 R100GS

  11. #11
    Beemerphan Radar41's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Clearcoating Snowflakes

    I had mine powdercoated in a silverflake to match the paint scheme. About 1500 miles on the rebuilt machine and they are a LOT easier to keep clean!!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Radar41; 10-23-2010 at 03:19 PM.
    Don "Radar" Wreyford
    00 K1200LT, 98 R1100GS AE, 84 R100RS, 76 R75/6
    MOA # 91738, RA #27032 , ABC #7915 - "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results" - Albert Einstein

  12. #12
    --Tony AnnapolisAirhead's Avatar
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    I've clearcoated two sets of snowflakes, great results and yes, much easier to keep clean.

    I used DuPont sating clear coat. A sheen but not too shiny. I didn't want bling, just ease of cleaning.
    1971 BMW R75/5 | 1975 Moto Guzzi 850T Cafe | 1983 BMW R100RS | 1988 BMW R100GS
    1988 BMW K75 | 1998 BWM R1100RT | 2000 Moto Guzzi Quota 1100ES |2002 Moto Guzzi V11 LeMans

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