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Thread: BMW's 100 year Anniversary Bike

  1. #16
    angysdad
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    BMW's 100th anniversary bike will require a third wheel. Either a sidecar or a 'Spyder' type set-up. They are not attracting new riders fast enough, so if they want to keep their aging customers vertical, that third wheel will be required for balance.
    I am joking, but only partly.
    A 100th anniversary BMW factory sidecar rig...might I dare dream...

  2. #17
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    The Enfield bet (declined) left me curious about their actual sales numbers. This is from their parent company Eicher 2009 annual report.

    The year 2009 has been an extremely good year for your Company with
    an all time high sales of 51955 motorcycles against 43298 motorcycles
    during 2008, thus registering a growth of 20%. Performance was good
    in both domestic as well as export markets with sale of 50002 motor
    cycles (previous year 41542) and 1953 motorcycles (previous year
    1756) respectively.

    To the topic at hand:
    - BMW built a single to restart the company in the post war era, so why not again?
    - Take a cylinder from the HP2 and turn it into a high performance single.
    - Put it in a frame with comfortable ergonomics but a sporting design.
    - Minimal, if any bodywork
    - I would be happy with a chain drive.

    I would like to see it as an expansion of the sport line but in the long haul the engine could be the basis for all sorts of fun bikes.

  3. #18
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    For what it's worth...

    I think BMW has lost it's way. There is nothing distinctively "BMW" to make them instantly recognizable from UJMs. What happened to that bare-bones, "form follows function" Teutonic mindset that made the marque what it was? Too many industrial design school grads* with CAD surfacing-programs, and not enough nuts & bolts engineers, and managers that ride their own products and listen to their customers. Hr. de Waal being a notable exception.

    I won't buy a new BMW, until 1) It is air-cooled - yeah, I know, emissions level are harder to attain - I don't care ... WORK ON IT! 2) I can maintain it myself and fix it with the on-board tool kit, 3) it doesn't have so much bodywork on it that it looks like a car, better yet, how 'bout no bodywork,4) it's shaft-driven, 5) and this is a big one ... it weighs less than 460 pounds wet, and 6) the biggest one ... it costs $6,000, or so.

    Guess I'm stuck with my /5. Too bad I can't buy a new one, I'd like to.

    I mean seriously, if Royal Enfield can continue to new sell motorcycles based on an upgraded, old design (EFI, electronic ignition, electric start) why not BMW?

    My $.02USD (.016 ΤιΌ)



    * I am an Industrial Designer.
    BMW has always been building the latest and most advanced motorcycles, even the airheads were high tech for their day. I hope they keep pushing the limits of design and technology and I hope that the 100 year bike represents the pinacle of technology for 2023.

    If BMW was still only building 1970s technology airhead type motorcycles I'm sorry to say I would not be a BMW owner. I doubt I'm alone on that.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2019 F850GSA

  4. #19
    You stupid, fix it! r11rs94's Avatar
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    I've been wondering this question ever since I saw BMW's 80 year anniversary Rockster.

    Any Ideas what BMW's 100 year Anniversary bike will be???


    R-1300- RS Pearl White with a teal seat, Just a guess but I will buy one..
    The thing about traveling is, you never want it to end and you can't wait to get home.
    I answer to Roy, Chief, or Sarg.
    04 R-1150-RT current bike. 94 R-1100-RS74,383, Sold, 78 R-80/7, K.I.A by a D.U.I
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  5. #20
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Ed Miller/MCMXCIVRS has it right.

    BMW is not going to build a 100th Anniversary bike that looks like a /2, an Airhead or even an R32. They didn't build a New Isetta or a new 2002 for 2002. They aren't doing retro bikes like Triumph and Ducati.

    BMW is a forward looking company. They are very aware of their past, and very proud of it, but they don't rest on those laurels. We think their current designs are ugly because it takes a while to grow into them. They are designs that reflect what is possible at present.

    The 100th Anniversary bikeS will be whatever the current high end models are at that time with some kind of added package. Look at the R100 Last Editions or the current 30th Anniversary GSes for a clue.
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  6. #21
    dinandan
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    As the originator of this thread...

    YES, the three previous posts are exactly right! BMW will not look back but make the 100 year anniversary bike the pinnacle of modern motorcycle technology.

    I don't think the 100 year anniversary bike with be anything but a boxer set-up with shaft drive. The GS line of bikes has its own anniversary so I doubt that will be it. I'm predicting a naked bike (like the Rockster) or a RS type sport touring machine.

    As a relatively young MOA member (my 1983 R80RT is older than me) I would ONLY buy the 100 year anniversary bike if it had the latest technology and looked and performed like nothing ever built before it.

    And yes, I do ALL my own maintenance (this winter I will be rebuilding the top end on my R80RT so it will last until 2023).

  7. #22

    I'd buy that in a heart beat!

    Quote Originally Posted by ted View Post
    if bmw uses this as inspiration i would buy two

    +1

    I'm young (<30) and I think a retro bike would be sweet and something special too. Otherwise, go really high end like the HP2 series. A splash of paint and such wouldn't do it for me.

  8. #23
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
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    Max BMW refurbs airheads and older BMWs on a regular basis. The only downside is that they cost as much as a new hexhead.

    I have both a 86 R80 and a 2011 R1200R. As much as I like the R80, I like the R1200R a lot better.

    The idea of a $6,000 airhead revival bike is complete fantasy even if it was made in India.
    BMW R bike rider, horizontally opposed to everything...

  9. #24
    I'm suspect there is at least one other person out there in Beemerland besides me who would like to see (buy) a shaft drive lightweight tourer with dimensions similar to the motorcycles of the 60's and 70's. IMO the engines in the four cylinder K bikes should have been vertical, not flopped over - for minimum motorcycle width. I recall there was a north-south vertical twin prototype in the early nineteen eighties designated the M108. They should pull the drawings, update the design, add another cylinder, and produce such a bike.

    I built my own version of such a bike, which appears below. It is built of parts from my parts bin, with /7 suspension, 5-speed gearbox, and /5 shaft drive, /7 controls and electrics, and a few Japanese and American parts. It weighs about 500 lbs but could easily lose 50 lbs by using lighter materials. The mild cruiser design is very comfortable, sort of like an Indian Four. The motorcycle is about 15 inches wide at the foot boards. Please excuse the temporary (ugly) un-BMW-like fuel tank. Incidentally the bike is powered by a 950cc triple, gets 91 mpg, with a range of 450 miles. Oh, did I mention it's a diesel?


  10. #25
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Nice project! May we see more? Love the front drum brake!

    edit -

    the bike is powered by a 950cc triple, gets 91 mpg ... it's a diesel?
    Kubota industrial engine? Mated to a BMW transmission?
    Last edited by Lmo1131; 08-27-2011 at 04:37 PM.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden
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  11. #26
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    Could this be the future?

    If Chris Malloy's Hoverbike works as it's designed to work, there's going to be a long line of customers waiting for a chance to get on board, this twin rotor BMW boxer powered hovercraft flying motorcycle will do more than give you the feeling of flying, you'll BE flying.

    From The Kneeslider.com, "The carbon fiber Hoverbike weighs 231 pounds with a maximum takeoff weight of 595 pounds. On just the primary fuel tank it has a range of 92 miles at 80 knots (92 mph), with a theoretical top speed of 172 mph and a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet! So far, all tests have been tethered so these performance figures are somewhat speculative, but if he gets into the next phase of actual untethered flight, we'll know whether those numbers can be achieved.

    Control is by the motorcycle style handlebars, twist grips control rotor thrust and deflection of the air vanes which provides forward and reverse, turns are controlled by turning the bars, somewhere in the near future are gyros for stability and explosive parachutes to bring the craft down in the event of engine failure or the rider can wear a chute, too. Counter rotating rotors eliminate the need for a tail rotor.

    Malloy says the Hoverbike is actually designed for utilitarian purposes like search and rescue, power line inspection and the like, but I can't see this staying out of the hands of thrill seekers who have always dreamed of a bike like this. He figures it will be classed as an ultralight in the US eliminating the need for a pilot's license."
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  12. #27
    Harrington
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    For what it's worth...

    I think BMW has lost it's way. There is nothing distinctively "BMW" to make them instantly recognizable from UJMs. What happened to that bare-bones, "form follows function" Teutonic mindset that made the marque what it was? Too many industrial design school grads* with CAD surfacing-programs, and not enough nuts & bolts engineers, and managers that ride their own products and listen to their customers. Hr. de Waal being a notable exception.

    I won't buy a new BMW, until 1) It is air-cooled - yeah, I know, emissions level are harder to attain - I don't care ... WORK ON IT! 2) I can maintain it myself and fix it with the on-board tool kit, 3) it doesn't have so much bodywork on it that it looks like a car, better yet, how 'bout no bodywork,4) it's shaft-driven, 5) and this is a big one ... it weighs less than 460 pounds wet, and 6) the biggest one ... it costs $6,000, or so.

    Guess I'm stuck with my /5. Too bad I can't buy a new one, I'd like to.

    I mean seriously, if Royal Enfield can continue to new sell motorcycles based on an upgraded, old design (EFI, electronic ignition, electric start) why not BMW?

    My $.02USD (.016 ΤιΌ)



    * I am an Industrial Designer.
    BMW is doing fine. They can't continue to appeal to an aging demographic and hope to stay in the bike business. They are trying to build up another generation of lifetime riders and IMO they are successful. The SR1000 is doing great at the local tracks and BMW is again known for performance by riders. I wouldn't be surprised to see a 600 supersport come out once the economy picks up.

  13. #28
    On the road again! R80RTJohnny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r60us View Post
    I'm suspect there is at least one other person out there in Beemerland besides me who would like to see (buy) a shaft drive lightweight tourer with dimensions similar to the motorcycles of the 60's and 70's. IMO the engines in the four cylinder K bikes should have been vertical, not flopped over - for minimum motorcycle width. I recall there was a north-south vertical twin prototype in the early nineteen eighties designated the M108. They should pull the drawings, update the design, add another cylinder, and produce such a bike.

    I built my own version of such a bike, which appears below. It is built of parts from my parts bin, with /7 suspension, 5-speed gearbox, and /5 shaft drive, /7 controls and electrics, and a few Japanese and American parts. It weighs about 500 lbs but could easily lose 50 lbs by using lighter materials. The mild cruiser design is very comfortable, sort of like an Indian Four. The motorcycle is about 15 inches wide at the foot boards. Please excuse the temporary (ugly) un-BMW-like fuel tank. Incidentally the bike is powered by a 950cc triple, gets 91 mpg, with a range of 450 miles. Oh, did I mention it's a diesel?

    Beautiful and very interesting machine. Will you provide us with more information.

    Thank you.
    2008 R12RT (Blue)
    1986 R80RT (Silver)

    Member of the Loonie-Tics. MOA 292.

  14. #29
    Here you go.

    The motorcycle was completed over a ten year period, the first test ride last September. All work, with the exception of surface milling of the bellhousing and flywheel modification for the BMW clutch, was done by me. It is currently a rolling project, with about half a dozen mostly cosmetic items to be completed this winter e.g. exhaust heat shields, seat, fuel tank, radiator & alternator shroud, floor boards, etc.

    Engine:Three cylinder liquid cooled Daihatsu 953cc 26.8 hp @ 3600 rpm; Kawasaki Mean Streak radiator, engine driven mechanical fan
    Gearbox: /7 5-speed
    Final Drive: post 1980 2.91:1
    Electrics: 480 watt Denso alternator, /7 headlight, post 1980 switches, /5 signal lights, repro British tail light, modified /6 wiring harness
    Handlebar / Controls: 1977 US bar and controls
    Cables: Stock BMW throttle, clutch, and brake cables
    Instrument Cluster: Custom with VDO programmable 85 mph speedo and 4000 rpm tach; usual indicator lamps plus glow plug & fuel filter water warning lamps
    Battery: Yuasa 28 Ah
    Fuel tank capacity: 5.5 gallons
    Seat: Borrowed from my 2011 Suzuki TU250X. Seat height 30 inches.
    Exhaust: custom header & exhaust pipes, HD Sportster mufflers
    Windscreen: National Cycle Streetshield EX
    Suspension: Front R60/6, Rear /5 SWB swingarm, /7 Koni shocks with Honda GL1000 springs
    Wheels/Tires: Front and Rear 4.00 X 18 Metzelers on /7 rear wheels
    Center stand: modified /7
    Sidestand: Modified Honda CM185

    Performance
    Cruise performance comparable to R80 / R90 (torque is everything)
    Easily pulls away from engine idle in 5th gear (normal gear shifts @ 1800-2000 rpm) Impossible to stall engine!
    Very comfortable to ride.
    Engine's mechanical governor provides automatic cruise control at any throttle setting
    Max Speed: 68 mph @ 3600 rpm (limited by governor).
    Planned upgrade to specially modified gearbox will increase top speed to 78 mph @ 3600 rpm
    Fuel Consumption: 91-100 mpg depending on cruise speed. With gearbox upgrade 108 mpg expected.
    Correction: Should read 80-83 miles /US gallon (91-100 mpg / Imperial gallon)

    Yes, I could have installed a /7 disk brake but the /6 drum setup yields the same or better result.


    Last edited by r60us; 08-29-2011 at 09:17 PM. Reason: Miles per gallon was stated in Imperial measure only

  15. #30
    Registered User Rod Sheridan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    For what it's worth...

    I think BMW has lost it's way. There is nothing distinctively "BMW" to make them instantly recognizable from UJMs. What happened to that bare-bones, "form follows function" Teutonic mindset that made the marque what it was? Too many industrial design school grads* with CAD surfacing-programs, and not enough nuts & bolts engineers, and managers that ride their own products and listen to their customers. Hr. de Waal being a notable exception.

    I won't buy a new BMW, until 1) It is air-cooled - yeah, I know, emissions level are harder to attain - I don't care ... WORK ON IT! 2) I can maintain it myself and fix it with the on-board tool kit, 3) it doesn't have so much bodywork on it that it looks like a car, better yet, how 'bout no bodywork,4) it's shaft-driven, 5) and this is a big one ... it weighs less than 460 pounds wet, and 6) the biggest one ... it costs $6,000, or so.

    Guess I'm stuck with my /5. Too bad I can't buy a new one, I'd like to.

    I mean seriously, if Royal Enfield can continue to new sell motorcycles based on an upgraded, old design (EFI, electronic ignition, electric start) why not BMW?

    My $.02USD (.016 €)



    * I am an Industrial Designer.
    Funny, my wife has almost given up her 1976 R60/7 for her new F650GS. Diann felt that the last "good" bike BMW made was the /7 series.

    There are lots of things that are instantly recognisable as BMW, take the dumb airhead sidestand, now look at the 2011 f650GS with a dumb side stand, that has the smallest footpad I've ever seen on a stand. See, dumb stand design does carry forward.

    The F650GS is as light as her R60/ has far better brakes, tires, suspension and frame. It gets far better gas mileage, and runs on regular grade gasoline.

    It has an electrical system that has higher output, I am however laughing at it having a wet alternator with shunt voltage regulator, just like my 75 Norton.

    Yes it's chain drive, however that's easy to repair if it fails at the side of the road, which it is less likely to do than a shaft drive configuration. (easy to check a chain and sprocket for wear, a little more work required on a right angle drive set).

    Don't get me wrong, I love the airheads, however they aren't where the future is.

    Regards, Rod.
    Work is the curse of the riding class

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