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Thread: Why Is There Not A Tool???

  1. #1
    Slow & Easy
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    Why Is There Not A Tool???

    GM List. While I was trying to decide how to decarbonize my heads I called several BMW Dealerships to find out what tool was used. I was looking to either buy(depending on cost) or make a tool that would hold the overhead cam sprocket so the bolt that holds the sprocket to the cam shaft could be loosened. I was surprised 3 out of 4 of the dealerships did not have a tool and the one that did had made the tool themselves. My concern is how do you keep from wiping bearings, damaginging the chain, or breaking a chain rail. I'm not a mechanical engineer so I err on he side of caution. Please ease my concerns educate me.

    Thanks list

  2. #2
    Kool Aid Dispenser! jimvonbaden's Avatar
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    There is:



    Just zip tie the chain to the cam gear and let it rest as you pull off the head. You wont damage it.

    Little hint, leave the piston in the bore if you intend to pull the jugs. Just disconnect the piston at the wrist pin.

    Jim
    www.JVBProductions.com Now, all videos available via download or DVD, or USB for the Wethead.

  3. #3
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    OK. Jim, when I was talking to shops one said you needed to heat the bolt to make it easier to break. To what temperature do you heat the bolt and why does the tie not melt??? Also how is the bolt tightened at the factory???

  4. #4
    Kool Aid Dispenser! jimvonbaden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Faria View Post
    OK. Jim, when I was talking to shops one said you needed to heat the bolt to make it easier to break. To what temperature do you heat the bolt and why does the tie not melt??? Also how is the bolt tightened at the factory???
    I'd have to check the manual, but I never needed to heat the bolt. As for how do you hold the cam chain/cam/gear, you lock the motor at the flywheel with a special tool that fits through a hole over the starter, or use an appropriately sized allen wrench.

    The torque you use wont overwhelm the components locked this way.

    Jim
    www.JVBProductions.com Now, all videos available via download or DVD, or USB for the Wethead.

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    Would having your heads polished help keep the carbon build up from occuring as fast?

  6. #6
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    Even if you lock the fly wheel you are putting stress on the cam bearing when you rock the cam shaft trying to break loose the bolt, you still stress the cam chain when it is pulled against the locked engine, and how much force will the plastic chain rails take before they crack or break??? How does the factory torque the cam bolt to 45ft-lbs???

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Faria View Post
    Even if you lock the fly wheel you are putting stress on the cam bearing when you rock the cam shaft trying to break loose the bolt, you still stress the cam chain when it is pulled against the locked engine, and how much force will the plastic chain rails take before they crack or break??? How does the factory torque the cam bolt to 45ft-lbs???
    I think you are over-thinking the issue Dave. Yes, applying a wrench to loosen or tighten that bolt puts some stress on the bearings, but not much compared to the loads from a rapidly turning cam lobe pressing on the pushrod. BMW specs that you lock the flywheel in position at TDC and remove the bolt, with the chain holding the sprocket. It works. I've done it several times to no ill effect.

    One cautionary note. The cam sprockets are a little cheesy and the tab that is pressed into the sprocket to engage the detent in the end of the cam is very soft. Make absolutely sure that the sprocket is in place correctly and that the tab is in the detent. If a few degrees off the tab bends and the sprocket bolts up tight, but valve timing is off. And then the rising piston and valve heads collide and that is a nasty mess. I always turn the engine over several revolutions by hand after reinstalling a head to make sure it's right and I feel no interference.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  8. #8
    BOKRIJDER
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    I can appreciate your concern for doing this job properly, but at the same time it appears that you do not have the BMW manual on hand --- hmmmm. That little bolt is not the only critical phase of the job - not difficult, but must be done correctly.

    Factory procedure for torquing the bolt - I expect that they follow the published procedure. Yes, there is a flywheel locking tool allowing the job to be easily done on the bench. The high gear, locked rear brake trick has worked for me. The removal break free point will be higher than 45. Heat, haven't done it, but I'd wouldn't go higher than being able to hold your hand on the part. Use a quality certified torque wrench on reassembly. Follow your new manual to a "T" and you'll be good to go.
    Use the tywrap as suggested, anchoring the chain into the sprocket before loosening.
    I also tie a string to the tywrap. If you accidentally drop the wheel, it will avert cardiac arrest.

    Bokrijder

  9. #9
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    Paul, thanks for your comments. I just want to do it right.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the idea of the string on the tie wrap.

  11. #11
    BOKRIJDER
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    Another tip - as soon as the head is removed, take a single white cloth rag and plug the chain galley tight. After years of wrenching, one discovers that any falling object will end up in the most inappropriate place. A dropped bit will defy gravity and fall sideways just to land in the worst spot. Why cloth? - paper will tear as it is removed - white to better see.

    Bokrijder

  12. #12
    Registered User ANDYVH's Avatar
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    Ok, my question is: How many miles on your engine that it needs the heads removed to clean out the carbon?

    I have 145,000 miles on my RS, and I have no pinging issues, it idles fine, does not use oil more than what would be normal. I have never had the injectors cleaned, though that will likely happen this spring because I need to rebuild my throttle bodies (play at the cable pulleys). I have been a regular Techron user for many years, running Techron through my bike at least twice per season. The fuels up here in east central Wisconsin are not the oxygenated type.
    Get trained! The best "performance" upgrade you can get is YOU. Visit msf-usa.org for training info.

  13. #13
    Kool Aid Dispenser! jimvonbaden's Avatar
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    A lot depends on the way you ride your bike. If you live below 4000 RPM you will eventually have carbon build-up. If you use the full rev range on a regular basis you are much less likely. Adding additives like Techron once in a while helps as well.

    No reason a well maintained engine should need the heads pulled for carbon otherwise IMHO.

    Jim
    www.JVBProductions.com Now, all videos available via download or DVD, or USB for the Wethead.

  14. #14
    Registered User ANDYVH's Avatar
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    That's what I feel too. Although my 94 RS has somewhat high miles on it, I don't consider it that much. Heck, a few members in my local BMW club have WELL over 200,000 miles on their old R and K bikes, with no mention of pulling the heads to remove carbon deposits. One member has 209,000 on his 2003 R1150R. I know his maintenance regimen and he has not pulled the heads off.

    I have heard of using water vapor, sprayed into the throttle bodies on a fully warmed running engine to clean out carbon deposits. But I ahve not tried it myself. Now, on my bike I may be pulling the heads as I suspect a cam-chain ticking noise may be my chain guides, especially the right side. I did the cam chain tensioner update on the left side last year. I do know some noise is coming from my throttle bodies so I suspect the shaft wear is causing some noise. If I pull the heads off I will have some proof if the years of Techron and Seafoam use has done anything to minimize carbon buildup.

    Mr. Glaves, can you educate us? Does Techron minize carbon buildup? Will water mist injection clean the carbon out without pulling the heads? Does Voni's high mileage RS exhibit any carbon buildup issues? Does sooty residues at the back of the muffler indicate a carbon buildup issue? Or is that simply a slightly rich fuel mix (I have a Techlusion on my bike)?
    Get trained! The best "performance" upgrade you can get is YOU. Visit msf-usa.org for training info.

  15. #15
    To decarbonize heads on an Oilhead all you need to do is ride in a very very heavy rainstorm.

    Carbon story:

    Voni and I were riding in very heavy rain, up the Interstate towards Iowa (if that matters). It was pouring but we were on a mission. Bikes were running fine. Time to stop for gas arrived. We pulled down the off ramp and at idle Voni's R1100RS died. It wouldn't restart. We pushed it over under the underpass and I did a couple of tests. Fuel was squirting. It had spark. It wouldn't start. I rode 150 miles home, got the trailer, and retrieved the bike.

    Back in the shop I discovered it had next to zero compression in both cylinders. A leakdown test showed strong flow into the exhaust. I started imagining bent valves or something and decided I had to pull the heads to see. As soon as the first head was off I started laughing. The piston top and combustion chamber were almost completely shiny aluminum - not much carbon left. But lodged under the exhaust valves were tiny bits of hard carbon which prevented the valves from closing. Same problem on the other side. The air cleaner was wet with water.

    Apparently going down the road at highway speed the air snorkel was ingesting water. At highway speed and RPM the carbon bits were breaking loose and blowing past the valves, but when she dropped it to idle the last of the carbon bits got lodged under the valves.

    I've always figured that if we went 10 more miles before stopping for gas the carbon would have been gone completely and it wouldn't have been a problem.

    But this is a cautionary tale for those who wish to try our old gearhead trick of water in the intake, and even for additive use on heavily carbonized combustion chambers. Bits can break loose and lodge under an exhaust valve.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 05-07-2010 at 11:06 PM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

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