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Thread: First Tire Change?

  1. #1
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    First Tire Change?

    New tires, tubes and rim strips arrived yesterday for my R75/6. I have Dynabeads that I plan to use in lieu of wheel weights.

    I've never changed a motorcycle tire before, but have changed countless bicycle tires. I have changed vintage Vespa tires, too, but they have a two-part rim so tire irons are unnecessary. I have only the tire tools from the stock tool kit.

    How much time should I set aside for this task?

    Are there any other tricks or accessories that would be helpful?

    Is talcum powder between tire and tube recommended?

    TIA,
    Justin

  2. #2
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    This might be a good tutorial:

    http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/tire/index.htm

    IMO, it's going to be tough with just the tool kit equipment. The tubeless tires these days aren't as flexible with the steel bead as compared to yesteryear older tires meant for tubes. Worth a try. At least you'll find the point at which you whip out the plastic and pay to have it done. It'll give you some idea of what to do if a flat happens on the road.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #3
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link...

    the tire I have in back is the same size as the one on the link, explaining why my Speedo is off.

  4. #4
    Registered User kgadley01's Avatar
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    you will need to pick up a set of longer tire irons. I use the 16" ones. makes life a lot easyier.
    AKA SNAPGADGET
    Lifes too short to ride an ugly Motorcycle

  5. #5

    Have fun!!

    The sun is your friend- let the tire sit in the sun to warm it up make it more flexible.


    I know it is a challenge but do consider having a "Man with a Machine" do this you will save lots of swearing and busted knuclkles.
    Last edited by 85K100LT; 04-29-2010 at 05:45 PM.
    1974 R75/6 W Sidecar
    1989 R100GS


  6. #6
    Registered User Bob_M's Avatar
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    It is a good idea that you have the ability and confidence to change/fix a flat. Once you are comfortable that this is in your skill set, you may want to hire out this task to the previously mentioned "Man with machine".

    The pictorial tutorial is pretty good. I have had difficulty breaking the bead in the field. One neat trick is using the bikes side stand as a bead breaker. You may need your riding buddy with a second motorcycle to perform this trick.

  7. #7
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    The owners manual (if you have one) that came with the bike will walk you throught the necessary steps to remove the wheel. The tools in the kit are adequate for changing the tires. From my experience, the tubes come with talc on them. I never bothered changing the rim tape that covers the spoke ends, but if it's rotted, then do so. I have a 75 R60/6. The first time will be the hardest. After that, time will be cut in half. Soapy water helps. After you do it a few times, you may just take the wheel in and pay the 35 bucks or so to have the dealer do it. They will check the bearings at the same time, and spin and balance.

  8. #8
    Registered User stkmkt1's Avatar
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    I just changed out the rear tire on my GSA using the short tire levers in the Motion Pro kit. No problems at all. Well, let's not talk about breaking the bead. That was not fun. Otherwise, first time - 1 hour to change tire and balance. After you get the hang of it, maybe as quick as half-hour.
    '09 BMW 1200 GSA, 2013 BMW 700GS, 2000 Goldwing SE, '09' V Star 950, '09 Honda Rebel,
    '77 Honda 750A. Holding at six til I get new garage built - need more room for more bikes!

  9. #9
    Monza Blue 1974 R90/6
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    Three things to consider in my opinion -

    Lube - do a search on this forum for multiple discussions about lube. Couple of products come to the top. Seems whichever you choose, it isn't expensive and works much better than soap and water.

    Rim Protectors - you can also get these neat little pieces of plastic that clip on the rim and keep the iron from gouging it. If you search on the lube as I mention above, you also read about making rim protectors from empty plastic bottles. The ones I bought were not expensive and I think they probably work better than strips.

    Once the tire is off, take the time to clean up the inside of the rim and the edges where bead seats. Its amazing how much crud accumulates and the "man with the machine" doesn't clean as part of the mount and balance.

    +1 on all the other tips above and ones to follow.

    Kudos for giving it a shot. In my case, I couldn't believe how difficult it was to get the first tire off, but sure enough, it was easier on the second. I'm confident now that the tire kit I carry in the tank bag would allow me to fix a flat on the road. That in itself is worth the effort (I think).

    Barron

  10. #10
    Grammarian no, Rider yes ISAMEMON's Avatar
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    my least fav job. I have done many in my "youth". and it is a good practice for side of the road repairs
    I wont do it again unless my son wants to go half on a no-mar machine

    however I have moved up to cast tubless rims and a plug kit
    which, knock on wood , have not needed yet

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Barron_Williams View Post

    Lube - do a search on this forum for multiple discussions about lube. Couple of products come to the top. Seems whichever you choose, it isn't expensive and works much better than soap and water.



    Barron
    +!. The lube is the key. Also make sure the tire seats correctly on the rim. It will 'pop' when it seats. Again, lube helps. There is probably a line molded into the tire that will be exposed adjacent to the rim when the tire is properly seated.
    Sent from a Galaxy, far, far away

  12. #12
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Thanks for the posts so far...

    I have the owners manual and the BMW, Clymer and Haynes manuals.

    I've taken the front wheel off, I rebuilt the forks last fall. I've not taken the rear off yet.

    I picked up some longer irons today, but the shop had just moved its accessories and the lube had yet to turn up.

    From the sound of it, breaking the bead is the biggest PITA, but I'll see when I take on the job. At least the tire wont be rusted to the rim as is often the case with old Vespas.

    For me, the point of the exercise is learning how to do if I need to in the future and learning if it's a job I'm willing to do myself or am happy to pay someone else.

  13. #13
    Das Drogenhandler troyboy's Avatar
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    A big C-clamp makes a good bead breaker. I use dishsoap for tire lube,little messy but it works. If the old tubes are decent,I'll save them for emergencies. If I tear one,I'll use it for practice with my patch kit.

  14. #14
    Rally Rat
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    Don't let anyone discourage you. I recently did the same job for the first time because I also wanted to know I could do it. First one, PITA no doubt. I've done several since without even breaking a sweat. All with the BMW tool kit irons (I have three of them and it helps).

    You've gotten some good advice here. I would add that Windex makes a perfectly acceptable substitute for lube. When leveraging the irons, take small bites. I kneel on the tire (knee pads help here too) and like the 10, 12 and 2 o'clock positions. Get them all wedged in between the tire and rime before leveraging any of them, then do one at a time (very difficult to get additional irons wedged in after you've stretched the tire with one of them). Just like with a bicycle wheel, if you feel like you hare having to use too much strength to move the levers, you're doing something wrong. With a bicycle you'd probably snap the levers. With a motorcycle you'll damage your rims. Try smaller bites.

    +1 on using something to protect the rims. I use cut up shampoo bottles. You'll be glad you did.

    About breaking the bead, just deflating it, rolling the bike a little, then walking on the tire might be enough to do it. Much easier than tubeless tires.

    To see a video of someone making it look ridiculously easy, check this out:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Pfp2Z9k0n0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AerHA...eature=related

    Good luck!

  15. #15
    Grammarian no, Rider yes ISAMEMON's Avatar
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    yes he sure makes it look easy

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