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Thread: Piss poor mileage

  1. #1
    Registered User
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    Piss poor mileage

    Lately,my'04 R1150R has been returning ridiculously low mileage. A couple tank fulls ago,the low fuel light came on at around 120 miles,next tank it came on at around 110 miles,today,I couldn't believe it,the light appeared at 102 miles.I'm running a K'n'N filter,which is definetly clean,wondering if anyone has knowledge of the injectors,or any clue as to why this is happening? Thanks in advance...Nose
    Nose

  2. #2
    jingdog
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    I would guess its the winter blend of gasoline kicking in.

  3. #3
    Registered User 41107's Avatar
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    i believe the sending unit is getting screwy.
    Karlheinz
    1998 r1100 rt/p
    1985 k 100 rs
    2001 k 1200 rs
    99 740 il

  4. #4
    The real question isn't when did the light come on. It is how many gallons did it take to replace what was burned in 102, or 120 or whatever miles.

    That will tell you what your mileage is, and whether it is a consumption issue or an instrumentation issue.

    Once you know that for sure you can address whatever the issue turns out to be.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  5. #5
    That is why I record 9 out of 10 fill ups to monitor consumption.

    Try to place the nozzle in the tank as shallow as possible to get the most fuel.
    I put it in 1/4" each time. Once it clicks off don't try to squeeze more in.
    My commute is 108.5 daily. Each day I put in 2.36(+-) to yield an average of 45.9.
    A few points either way is my variable. If it drops below 40 I investigate.

    Shell recently introduced nitrogen into their gas.
    My mileage immediately dropped below 40.

    As Paul notes... Monitor it. See what's being consumed.
    And try to be somewhat consistent when refueling.

    I try to use the same pump while commuting.

  6. #6
    BlueStreak
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrafikFeat View Post
    Shell recently introduced nitrogen into their gas.
    My mileage immediately dropped below 40.
    Maybe they are doing to gasoline what the grocery industry have done to coffee and ice cream... sell less for the same price.

  7. #7
    Bryan
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    Shell recently introduced nitrogen into their gas.
    My mileage immediately dropped below 40.

    I tend to use Shell frequently since its my primary gas card and more locations in my area. I hadn't thought much about the nitrogen issue, but my RT and especially my Funduro bikes have dropped mileage in recent months.

    RT with mid-grade was about 45 to 47 most fill-ups, now its about 40 to 42 lately. This is light load...only "me" on the bike..no baggage or Uni-go. Full load...get about 38 to 40mpg.

    I can't say its the nitrogen...as a previous posting states, this RT is about 100K miles now...but the coincidence is there.

    Scotchale

  8. #8
    America is in the middle of another mood swing.
    Greener cars are on the horizon.
    That being said... They still want that dial to turn at the pump.
    Since Nitrogen is the new buzz word...
    Why not put it in gas as a burn inhibitor.

    I won't be "not burning it" anytime soon.

  9. #9
    Aspiring Profligate Jeff488's Avatar
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    I am not a chemist, nor have I ever played one on TV.
    However, I thought nitrogen was an inert gas. I can't see liquid nitrogen remaining in the gasoline at normal temps.
    So what's the advantage to it? What do it do??

    This couldn't be like putting it in your tires, could it?
    '08 BMW R1200RT
    '08 Suzuki DL650 "Screaming Yellow Zonker"
    Looking for Ed Sanders' Truck Stop.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff488 View Post
    This couldn't be like putting it in your tires, could it?
    It creates the title of this thread.

  11. #11
    Registered User breyfogle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff488 View Post
    I am not a chemist,...
    However, I thought nitrogen was an inert gas.
    Nitrogen is far from an inert gas. One example: "Nitro"-glycerin

    another would be Trinitrotoluene, aka "TNT"
    '89 K75S Original Owner
    '94 (Beta) R11RS, ( RIP 12-5-2010 courtesy of blind left turning cage driver ) ....

  12. #12
    Nitrogen, as a gas is colorless, odorless, and generally considered an inert element.
    As a liquid (boiling point = minus 195.8oC), it is also colorless and odorless, and is similar in appearance to water.
    Nitrogen gas can be prepared by heating a water solution of ammonium nitrite (NH4NO3).

    The nitrogen cycle is one of the most important processes in nature for living organisms. Although nitrogen gas is relatively inert, bacteria in the soil are capable of ‘«£fixing‘«ō the nitrogen into a usable form (as a fertilizer) for plants. In other words, Nature has provided a method to produce nitrogen for plants to grow. Animals eat the plant material where the nitrogen has been incorporated into their system, primarily as protein. The cycle is completed when other bacteria convert the waste nitrogen compounds back to nitrogen gas. Nitrogen is crucial to life, as it is a component of all proteins.

    Nor am I a chemist... More a Googlist...

    But...

    The most revealing reason behind Shell's efforts to push nitrogen-enriched gas might be its decision to suspend research on alternative fuels.
    In March 2009, Shell announced it would hold back indefinitely on funding and research for solar and wind power. Hydrogen power was given the boot, too.
    Analysts cited recent drops in oil prices and an economic downturn as possible reasons for the move.

  13. #13
    Rally Rat
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    Piss Poor Mileage: Maybe you should try high test gas instead of piss

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by TomBarnhart View Post
    Piss Poor Mileage: Maybe you should try high test gas instead of piss
    ...or at least change it to Piss Pour.

  15. #15
    Registered User saylorspond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by breyfogle View Post
    Nitrogen is far from an inert gas. One example: "Nitro"-glycerin

    another would be Trinitrotoluene, aka "TNT"
    I am a chemist and even play one at home, although not a petroleum chemist. As was stated, nitrogen (N2) is an inert gas. The "nitro" you refer to is NO2.

    I am not familiar with the nitrogen claim, but addition of nitrogen gas would add nothing to fuel performance. Any nitrogen added to gasoline would eventually equilibrate with air. On the other hand, addition of a nitrogen containing hydrocarbon, such as TNT, could modify the performance of the fuel

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