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Thread: Progressive Springs for 1995 GSPD

  1. #1
    Loading the Bike 95PD's Avatar
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    Progressive Springs for 1995 GSPD

    Just bought my first beemer - 1995 R100GS PD. Love the bike, but hate the nosedive when breaking/downshifting. Everyone seems to suggest Progressive Springs and heavier fork oil. I spoke to a buddy of mine who is a Race Tech dealer/tech, and he said he's skeptical about using Progressive Springs, as most do not list spring rates. I noticed this too -- when searching for Progressives, most just say "Stiffer Springs help eliminate nose dive", etc. His opinion is that I should select the spring rate that fits my weight, riding style, and preferences. He did a fantastic job fine tuning my dirt bike and I'd like to have the same results on my GS. So here are a few questions that I'd love to have answered:

    1) What's the recommended fix for the GSPD front suspension?
    2) I think but am not sure that my model has Marzocchi forks -- how do I fine tune the compression/rebound on these forks?
    3) Does any manufacturer provide Progressive Springs with varying spring rates?

    Thanks in advance for the help,

    Mike

  2. #2
    Rbike
    Guest
    Recommended fixes...definatly add a better lower fork brace from C.C. Products at San Jose BMW. On and off road stability and feel will be greatly improved. Then add an oversized rotor and caliper adapter with a steel braided line from M.A.P Engineering for increased braking power.

    Or...find a way to adapt a set of modern inverted forks, maybe off of a KTM and let me know how you did it. I don't know how to tell if the spring rate will work with the beemer. A dealer told me they would cost about $1K plus the wheel and brake.

    Comp/Rebound is not seperatly adjustable and can only be changed by changing the fork oil. I did see a write up from somone who put in a RaceTech gold valve kit that was listed for a harley. He said that it wasn't worth the time and money and could only notice the very slightest improvement.

    I think the fork legs work independently, one controlling compression and one controlling rebound. I don't remember which does which, but I guess you could try different weight oils in the legs to make independent changes to the comp/rebound. I haven't tried this...just another crazy thought passing through my head.

    I haven't seen varying spring rates but I have put in progressive rate springs on an RT. The springs were definatly a progressive rate which can be verified by looking at the coils. A progressive rate spring will have different spacing between the windings, progressing from close to wider. A stiffer spring will have evenly spaced coils from top to bottom. The progressive rate springs did eliminate most of the dive. but I haven't done it to my PD.

  3. #3
    Loading the Bike 95PD's Avatar
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    Thanks Rbike

    Hi Dwight,

    Thanks for taking the time to reply. That was just the information I was looking for. I'm printing out your post, and will see my Race Tech buddy tonight. We'll talk it over and I'll pass along his thoughts on the matter. He and I both thought that maybe each fork leg served a different purpose -- after looking at the Clymer exploded view of the forks and reading your response, I'm sure of it.

    Talk to you soon,

    Mike

  4. #4
    Loading the Bike 95PD's Avatar
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    M.A.P. Engineering Oversized Rotor

    Rbike,

    If you don't mind -- how big a difference does the oversized rotor kit from MAP Eng. make?

    Thanks,

    Mike

  5. #5
    Rbike
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    I'd like to hear what the Race Tech guy has to say about improving the forks...and then you experience with the changes after you get to ride it.

    You got the oversized rotor info in a pm...but I'll repeat it for anyone else who wants to hear.

    Installing an oversized rotor and steel braided line allows two finger braking. The power and feel is improved so that you don't need a whole hand on the lever to get a hard stop. It won't match the brakes on a modern sport bike, but it is a huge improvement. It's also a benefit when you're fully loaded with gear or riding two up.

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