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Thread: H vs V Front tire

  1. #1

    H vs V Front tire

    About to purchase and install new Metzler Lasertec as a front tire on 93 R100RT.
    I am wondering if the V rated tire is a good choice thinking that because it is rated for higher speed it will be a stronger tire(sidewall wise)overall. I know I can not travel at those speeds but was considering that for $5 more is the investment worthwhile ? And will I trade ride comfort for performance aspect w/V rated tire?
    Any input appreciated and please forgive me if this is a dumb question
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    Higher speed rating? $5 more. Confidence in the tire? Priceless.

    Actually it probably really doesn't matter if you're not going to be running at the speed rating of the tire. The cheaper tire is just as solid as long as you stay within the speed and load ratings.

    Save the $5 and buy some BMW oil...OK, maybe 1/2 a quart!!!
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #3
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Many times the difference between a V-rated and H-rated tire is the V has less tread depth. It's tread squirm that creates the heat that leads to high-speed tire failure. I'd get the H.
    Kent Christensen
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    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  4. #4
    scqtt
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Many times the difference between a V-rated and H-rated tire is the V has less tread depth. It's tread squirm that creates the heat that leads to high-speed tire failure. I'd get the H.

    Kent is 100% right.

    Go for the H

  5. #5
    Registered User boxerkuh's Avatar
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    I run H rated tires on my bike, but one time needed a tire really bad and all I could find the same tire in V. I liked the H rated tires better, due to getting more mileage from it. V rated tires are usually a different and softer compound, which will lend you to less miles. Now if you are taking it up to the twisties, I would recommend V tire. So, I guess it depends a little on your type of riding you do.
    Keep the rubber side down!!
    1986 R 80 RS
    1992 R 100 R
    BMW MOA Life member; Ironbutt Member; Airhead Member

  6. #6
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    Your fron braking depeends on the from=n tire - which also heats up more slowly. Why then put on a tire which takes longer to get to operating temperature? it seems to me the "V" compromises front braking in a street setting.

  7. #7
    VANZEN
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    speed ratings

    speed ratings for motorcycle tires:

    type .........mph.....kph

    J Type.......62........100
    N Type......87........140
    P Type......94........150
    S Type......112......180
    H Type......130......210
    V Type......149......240
    Z Type......149+....240+

    so ... ask yourself this question:
    How often am I riding the old bike at speeds over 130 mph ?
    Last edited by vanzen; 05-07-2009 at 05:06 PM. Reason: clarity

  8. #8
    VANZEN
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    more heat

    From my experience, either an H-rated or V-rated (or Z-rated, for that matter) tire will get to operating temp quite quickly.
    Tires of all ratings are designed to operate and function well within a given temp range – which is why proper inflation is critical.
    And of course, any tire characteristic will be dependent upon the specific construction and compound of the tire in question ...

    If a tire is inflated properly and operating at temp, heat should not influence braking / handling –
    the tire will perform within it's design parameters.
    If anything, at least theoretically, comparing 2 tires, one H-rated and the other V,
    both of the same make, construction, tread design, and compound ...
    the V-rated tire should perform better as regards braking and handling.
    The lesser tread depth and therefor lesser "tread squirm" should result in greater stability.
    I say "theoretically" because at the speeds possible on an old Type-247 used on the street
    the differences may be negligible if not moot.
    Last edited by vanzen; 05-08-2009 at 03:47 PM.

  9. #9
    Registered User kgadley01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vanzen View Post
    speed ratings for motorcycle tires:

    type .........mph.....kph

    J Type.......62........100
    N Type......87........140
    P Type......94........150
    S Type......112......180
    H Type......130......210
    V Type......149......240
    Z Type......149+....240+

    so ... ask yourself this question:
    How often am I riding the old bike at speeds over 130 mph ?
    Vanzen, thanks for the chart... in order for a tire to receive a speed rating, it must run at that speed for two hours in 120 degree heat without failing. ie: a H rated tire should be able to be run at 130 MPH for two hours in 120 degree heat. I don't know about everyone, but this makes me feel pretty safe...

  10. #10
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    You will find that the H rated and V rated tires are almost identical except...

    V- higher speed rating
    H- Higher load rating

    Typically those ratings work against each other if I remember properly. If the spped rating is raised, the load rating goes down and vice versa.

    Get the H in my opinion.
    Steve Marquardt

  11. #11
    Dang. You guys know everything.

    I need to create a word document or something to store all the stuff I learn each day off the forum.

  12. #12
    Rally Rat
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    Quote Originally Posted by vanzen View Post
    speed ratings for motorcycle tires:

    type .........mph.....kph

    J Type.......62........100
    N Type......87........140
    P Type......94........150
    S Type......112......180
    H Type......130......210
    V Type......149......240
    Z Type......149+....240+

    so ... ask yourself this question:
    How often am I riding the old bike at speeds over 130 mph ?
    As if it could go 130 mph.
    Then again, I have V rated tires on mine, because they were what was in stock when I needed tires. I think the issue is as simple as that; find something you like for a price you're satisfied with. If you get more tire than you need for the same $ or less, great.
    Odds are you won't find anything less than an S rated tire nowadays, and that your bike would be hard pressed to push that limit.

  13. #13
    Registered User
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    There also is the adage about lowering the speed rating of the tire by 1 increment when putting a tube in it. I don't know whether I fully subscribe to this or not, but if you're running a tube in there even the H-rating tire will have you completely covered for almost any airhead in all but the most extreme situation.
    BMWs in my garage: 1982 R65LS, 1978 R100/7

  14. #14
    Kirbster919
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    I've got H-rated tires on my R80, and I'm happy with them. I'd save the $5 and get the H-rated tires, unless you really love hanging out at redline on the highway.

    Kirby

  15. #15
    Rally Rat
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    I notice this is your first post so welcome to a great forum.

    Lasertecs are often criticized here for wearing out quickly. I have gotten about 8500 miles out of mine. That's plenty for me but people looking for maximum miles out of their tires usually go with Metzeler ME 88 and ME 880. They can get about twice that amount. You should change your tires every three years regardless of mileage so it depends on your planed usage for the bike.

    But I digress ... H rating all the way.

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