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Thread: Shameless Trolling - For Touring Tips

  1. #16
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbrick View Post
    To facilitate gas stops, carry a credit card in the wrist pocket of your jacket. I get two cards from the card issuer, so the jacket card is always there and doesn't have to be moved to my wallet. I keep a $20 or $20 in there too, especially if I know there's a toll crossing on my route.

    For visor cleaning, carry a sopping-wet (old!) washcloth in a ziplock baggie, along with a softer cloth (old diapers are excellent) for drying.
    I made it easy for myself for the coming riding season - if it ever gets here. Six more inches of snow this morning.

    But check out www.speedpass.com

    Speedpass is free to get (my favorite price) and free to use the device. Unfortunately the gasoline you pump is not free. The device is a small dongle that you just touch to the gas pump and that is all you have to do. I think it works at most Mobil and Exxon pumps.

    The charge for the gas gets put on any credit card you designate ahead of time. So use an existing credit card account. It can all be done on line.

  2. #17
    JANMILLER
    Guest
    Put your rain suit in a compression sack.

    In reverse order of donning please. (do this with your tent too.)

    If you have 2 mark them clearly so you are not trying to put on your Sigy-Oh's small in the deluge.

    Put it on BEFORE it starts raining...

    Last thing in should be a plastic shopping bag or a motel shower cap. Put it over your boot, your rain pants will go on MUCH easier.

    Rain boots.. Spray them inside with silicone. Much easier to put on, especially if you didn't listen to 'BEFORE'...

    Neck opening leak??? I put a web strap around my rainsuit collar and pull it tight to close the opening... Not too tight... haha...

    Get a headlamp. Hands free... Beautiful.

    Carry a bag of Fritos to start fires with... JUST TRY IT!!! Light one.. 4" of flame.. FAT and OIL, yummm.... Good with dip after the fire is going too... I prefer Scoops...

    Tie a long string around your sidestand pad, with a loop you put around your mirror. You may drive away without picking it up, but it will follow you.. (my buddy Scott Bodeigheimer invented the sidestand pad with a string.. Told him to patent the idea... He could be rich now..)

    Keep your cell phone ON YOU.. It does you no good if it's on the burning bike 100 feet away and your foot is behind your head...

    Cheers!
    Last edited by JanMiller; 02-24-2009 at 08:06 PM.

  3. #18
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH View Post
    Pffog:

    Would you provide a little more information about these Mylar blankets.
    • Cost
    • Source
    • Uses
    • Sizes

    Sounds like one of them would be a useful piece of touring gear. I notice how runners in the Boston Marathon are wrapped in a silver sheet when they finish the race. Always thought it was because Boston can be mighty cold that time of year.
    About $1-$2 ( http://www.firstaidmonster.com/produ...oducts_id=6905 )
    They are about the size of a cell phone when folded, but very light, they open up to about 4x7 feet.

    As well as first aid for shock, which is going to be present in any trauma injury, the could be used as:
    An emergency waterproof or sun proof shelter.
    Replace a tent fly left home, torn, blown away in the wind.
    Replace a torn or forgotten ground cloth.
    They are shinny silver so could be a signal device if lost in the wilderness.
    Could be used to make a solar still for collecting water in the desert.
    A cloth to collect fluids, and errant parts during a road side repair.
    A waterproof cover for the tent or sleeping bag strapped to the rear of the bike.
    A waterproof poncho if you cut a couple of holes in it.
    And of course, as an emergency blanket, or a supplemental layer on a cold night.

    I am sure there are hundreds more.

    They are pretty tough and can be refolded, although the reflective coating suffers with a lot of use.

    I carry one in my bag of first aid supplies and in the coat of my ski jacket, should I ever be on a lift that quit and be stranded for a period of time, I would have my own little wind and waterproof shelter.

    Richard Stearns
    90896
    Batavia, NY
    Last edited by pffog; 02-24-2009 at 10:19 PM.

  4. #19
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmarkr View Post
    Red
    What do you carry in your medical kit? Do you have gear to deal with trauma? Do you have prescription-only meds like antibiotics and serious painkillers? How big is your kit?
    My first aid kit consists of 2-3 pairs of nitrile gloves, a couple of fabric cravats (triangular bandages), some 3x3 and 4x4 gauze pads, a roll of gauze, a roll of first aid tape, the space blanket, a CPR pocket mask, some band aids, some butterfly type band aids, some antibiotic ointment packets, some alcohol wipe packets, along with a few other odds and ends. All this fits in a ziplock sandwich bag to keep it contained and dry, and I keep a few kits around, so I usually have one with me regardless of the vehicle, or set up, one in the tank bag, one in the removable bags, and even one tucked under the seat cowl on the R11S, if it is a short ride.

    BUT the best thing to carry is KNOWLEDGE!!! None of this stuff is worth a flip with out some basic first aid knowledge. Most Red Cross chapters, community colleges, and a lot of fire departments offer some basic first aid courses that could save a life, take the time and learn some basic skills, beyond CPR.

    I go prepared, because nothing is worse, to me, than feeling helpless in any situation. I guess I would have been a good boy scout.


    Richard Stearns
    90896
    Batavia, NY
    Last edited by pffog; 02-24-2009 at 10:19 PM.

  5. #20
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Good Job SIBUD.
    Gold and Paper are the right answers.

    And For Today:

    My watch loses six minutes every hour. I set my watch at 7 A.M. using an accurate clock. Now, the time on my watch reads 1:45 P.M.
    What is the correct time?
    Last edited by PAULBACH; 02-27-2009 at 11:44 AM.

  6. #21
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Reminder

    The Touring Tips being sent are wonderful

    The readers in Owners News will greatly benefit by these cleaver tips.

    Please don't forget

    In order to complete submission of your Touring Tip:

    Please send
    First Name - Family Name & MOA Number
    City and State


    Thank You
    Paul
    Last edited by PAULBACH; 02-24-2009 at 07:10 PM.

  7. #22
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Up Dated Blue Ribbon Awards


    rmarkr


    pffog


    JanMiller

    Thank you!

    Obviously there would be no Touring Tips page without members who take their time to share their experiences with the rest of us.

  8. #23
    Hey Chromehead ! bobs98's Avatar
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    Quote:
    And For Today:

    My watch loses six minutes every hour. I set my watch at 7 A.M. using an accurate clock. Now, the time on my watch reads 1:45 P.M.
    What is the correct time?

    Correct time is 2:30 P.M.

    Another tip: Wet a rag towel and lay it across your windscreen for 10 minutes or so before heading out in the morning. This will loosen up bug debris while you load your bike. Prior to departure, simply wipe off the windscreen and enjoy a clear view to start your day.

    Bob Smith, 116468
    Marlton, NJ
    Last edited by bobs98; 02-25-2009 at 01:02 PM.
    Bob Smith
    1998 R1200C
    2005 Rocket III

  9. #24
    Hey Chromehead ! bobs98's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH View Post
    The readers in Owners News will greatly benefit by these cleaver tips.
    Always keep your cleaver sharp!
    Bob Smith
    1998 R1200C
    2005 Rocket III

  10. #25
    JANMILLER
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    About $1-$2 ( http://www.firstaidmonster.com/produ...oducts_id=6905 )
    They are about the size of a cell phone when folded, but very light, they open up to about 4x7 feet.

    As well as first aid for shock, which is going to be present in any trauma injury, the could be used as:
    An emergency waterproof or sun proof shelter.
    Replace a tent fly left home, torn, blown away in the wind.
    Replace a torn or forgotten ground cloth.
    They are shinny silver so could be a signal device if lost in the wilderness.
    Could be used to make a solar still for collecting water in the desert.
    A cloth to collect fluids, and errant parts during a road side repair.
    A waterproof cover for the tent or sleeping bag strapped to the rear of the bike.
    A waterproof poncho if you cut a couple of holes in it.
    And of course, as an emergency blanket, or a supplemental layer on a cold night.

    I am sure there are hundreds more.

    They are pretty tough and can be refolded, although the reflective coating suffers with a lot of use.

    I carry one in my bag of first aid supplies and in the coat of my ski jacket, should I ever be on a lift that quit and be stranded for a period of time, I would have my own little wind and waterproof shelter.
    I put one on the tent floor under my Thermarest. Used to have a great one, thin red vinyl on one side, reflective silver on the reverse, lasted for 2 decades before falling apart. Couldn't find a replacement, so using these mylar guys... pack to nothing, that is the beauty!

  11. #26
    JANMILLER
    Guest
    Got another one or two for you.

    Get a large zip lock bag and a neck strap with wide metal clip/grabbers.
    When it rains, and you have to cover your tank bag with its opaque cover, take your map, put it in the ziplock (with the part you want to see on the clear side) oriented so the 'zip' is at the 'bottom' of the map, put the strap around your neck, and put the clips over the ridge of the zip part... Presto, instant "NEKMAP", you can access in the rain. Wants to blow around, I tuck it between my belly and the tank bag...

    Use the same kind of clip strap and attach it to your small camera wrist strap, if you drop it while one-handing pictures it will save it.

    Keep a small metal thermos in your tankbag, water during the daytime, last stop for gas, fill it with coffee, nice in the morning.

    Buy coffee in small individual filter-packets, you can put them in your cup, and save washing your Jet Boil or coffee pot.

    Get small single-serving packets of Chrystal-Lite or the like, and keep them in the tank bag with that thermos of cold water.

    Keep several small 6" bungees in the tank bag.. Invaluable.

    Bring your extra spare eyeglasses if you wear glasses...

    Pack what you need first.... on top... in the bag you can open without unstrapping your tent.

    Ha, I cannot WAIT for the snow to melt and to get back on the road...

    Jan Miller # 112765
    Superior Wisconsin

  12. #27
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobs98 View Post
    Always keep your cleaver sharp!
    Darn spell check said it was ok. You have a clever eye as sharp as a cleaver.

  13. #28
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    From Michael Friedle

    Mike Friedle - extraordinary arranger of events large and small - past and present gave me this tip recently:

    He brings with him one of those sample carpets that carpet stores have bins of. He places it outside the entry to his tent and lets it collect all the debris and detritus, flotsam and jetsam of a day's journey.

    If has been a rainy day the mud goes on the carpet sample. The sample can be discarded when sodden or no longer meeting the high standards of a BMW adventure.

    Thanks Michael

  14. #29
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH View Post

    Please send
    First Name - Family Name & MOA Number
    City and State


    Thank You
    Paul
    Added to my posts.

  15. #30
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Ash Wednesday Trivia Question

    What does the mayor of Munich, Germany, traditionally dip into the city’s Fish Fountain (Fischbrunnen) every Ash Wednesday?

    Here's a clue - It's not a fish!
    But at sea it could catch a fish.

    Take a guess folks. Leaving a tip is not a requirement.

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