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Thread: Spline Lube

  1. #16
    Blocking the slow lane
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    Originally posted by dbrick
    I did it four times in the nine years I had my K75S. The first time took all day. Each subsequent time was shorter, down to about four hours. I think Don E. did it faster, and holds the record.
    I think Don E's record was set the time he didn't bother to align the clutch spline with the clutch plate. Maybe he can elaborate.
    Jon Diaz
    BMW K75/K12GT
    BMWMOA Ambassador

  2. #17
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Originally posted by jdiaz
    I think Don E's record was set the time he didn't bother to align the clutch spline with the clutch plate. Maybe he can elaborate.
    Yes and no. It was done during the fixing of the time I didn't get the clutch splines aligned correctly trying to do it the shortcut way (without tranny removal..) Which is one of the reasons I don't recommend doing the shortcut.

    After doing the R&R 3 times in 4 nights, I got pretty good at it, and I had a well trained assistant. We each took one side of the bike, had the right tools out and basically flew through the job. That was on a bike with ABS. Without ABS - figure we could have cut about 30 minutes off the time.

    Tricks/hints that work:

    1. Have a helper - makes it LOTS easier to R&R stuff. Find another K owner who wants to know how to do it - and swap jobs. When done with yours - you owe him to help do his.

    2. Since you have a helper - don't take things apart that don't have to. I do take the rear-drive off, but I don't take ths swingarm or driveshaft off.

    3. If you have ABS - don't disconnect anything. Removal of the ABS modulators leaves you having the bleed (not flush) the brakes. Even with a power-bleeder - this adds 30 minutes to the time required. Unbolt the ABS modulators and hang them from the frame with tie-wraps. Unbolt the rear caliper and hang it also. Unbolt the rear-master cylinder and hang it.

    4. If you did #3 (and aside from the modulator, the process is identical on the non-ABS models) - you can remove the tranny with the footpeg mounts in place - which make very handy grab-handles on each side to move it around.

    5. Mark any wires before disconnecting. My bikes always end up with numbered connectors (did every one on the new to me K75S when I replaced the wiring harness). Then you don't have to think about what goes to what. Just connect the dots (or numbers..)

    6. Beg/steal/borrow a motorcycle lift like the dealer has. I have a good friend who runs a small shop - he considers it educational to help doing these jobs and he has several air-lifts. Working at arm level is a great advantage, and the big table under the bike helps to keep tools and parts handy. It also means the bike is secure (in most cases - make sure your tie-downs are good), and you can usually take the back wheel off without removing anything else.

    7. Get containers for holding all the bits you take off. Segregate the bits into categories - like ALL brake bolts, ALL tranny bolts, etc. Helps on reassembly - less thinking involved (dunno about you, but thinking for me takes time.)

    8. Have the right tools. I made a clutch alignment tool. You can do the job without it - but why bother? I'd be willing to bet that some VW tool would work just fine (same basic clutch) perhaps with some creative resizing of the pilot bushing part - which could be done in a drill press (I have access to a lathe). Have ball-end metric allen drivers - they're great for spinning the hard to get to bolts out or in. Use the regular 3/8" drive allen drivers to tighten them up or break them free.

    Make yourself a set of transmission guide pins - 4 or 6 is good. Use bolts the same diameter and thread size as the stock bolts (any Home Depot has a supply of metric stuff - as do most auto-parts stores - take one out and take it with you), but about 1-1.5" longer. Cut the heads off and slot the stub end for a screwdriver. As you remove transmission bolts - screw in one of the guide bolts. They'll help guide it out and back in. This way you don't have to hold it up once you have it in position.

    9. Proceed in order - ie - Remove sidepanels. Remove complete exhaust system (get new header gaskets - the copper ones, and I'd recommend new header nuts). Disconnect battery. Remove the starter. Remove FI computer. Remove document/FI computer box. Loosen the front mount for the rear fender (it lets the battery come out lots easier - removal isn't necessary). Remove battery. Mark and disconnect all wiring. Remove rear wheel and rear-drive. Hang brake parts up. Disconnect clutch cable. Remove the center/sidestand mount. Remove transmission. Assembly is the reverse. I might have forgotten one or two things (it's from memory not looking at the bike..) but you get the idea. Don't jump from one area to another, and remove anything that makes removing anything else easier first.

    Once you get the hang of it - it's not rocket science, it's more like peeling an onion - with the core being the splines. Luckily - it's usually lots easier to put back together than an onion.

    BTW - when at a dealer - buy a few spares of the rubber mounts for the document box. One WILL get lost if you don't have spares. That's a promise. They bounce REAL GOOD.. (DAMHIK.. I have about 6 spares now..)

    The record - if I remember right was about 90 minutes - and that included replacing ALL the clutch components except the clutch basket (housing in BMW talk). When I did the K75S, I think I was a bit out of practice and it took just a bit over 2 hours (I also did do some lily-gilding - cleaning stuff, polishing things that don't need polishing - which added into the time).

    HTH

    Don
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

  3. #18
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    Follow up

    I failed to mention that the mechanic who worked on my bike said that while the spline was not dry, it had become "pastey". This indicates to me that I did the right thing by having this service done when I did (48,000 miles). So I guess as long as I keep riding the bike on a regular basis I won't need to worry about another lube until I have 96,000 on the odometer. I can live with that.

  4. #19
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Re: Follow up

    Originally posted by KAW
    I failed to mention that the mechanic who worked on my bike said that while the spline was not dry, it had become "pastey". This indicates to me that I did the right thing by having this service done when I did (48,000 miles). So I guess as long as I keep riding the bike on a regular basis I won't need to worry about another lube until I have 96,000 on the odometer. I can live with that.
    IF they used the Moly-60 lube - you can safely forget about it for a long time. If they used the BMW#10 lube - you're gonna be due for it WAY too soon..

    BTW - did one last night for a friend. Started about 7:30, finished about 10:30.. some of the time was spent instructing, and some cleaning up parts. He rides all year - so lots of fasteners had been attacked by salt..
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

  5. #20
    eric2
    Guest

    white grease

    Just as a data point here's a pic of grease on the clutch splines
    of the clutch on an 85 k100rs with about 53k on the odo. The surface rust is the result of the motor sitting exposed in my garage for a year or two. Splines looked great (they are now in
    Cary Stotlands K11LT)

    I bought this bike with 20K on it and am pretty sure
    the PO did not do a spline lube, and I didn't either.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #21
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Re: white grease

    Originally posted by nfgeezer
    Just as a data point here's a pic of grease on the clutch splines
    of the clutch on an 85 k100rs with about 53k on the odo. The surface rust is the result of the motor sitting exposed in my garage for a year or two. Splines looked great (they are now in
    Cary Stotlands K11LT)

    I bought this bike with 20K on it and am pretty sure
    the PO did not do a spline lube, and I didn't either.
    Question - this was what you saw when you opened it up?

    If it was gray/white - it's the original factory grease.. Straburgs (or something like that spelling..)
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

  7. #22
    K75Scape
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    Angry Splines

    I bought my 1987 k75s new, the dealer has told me to have the splines lubed every year! I think that's rediculous. I also complained since week one about moisture in the gauges, they consistenly refused to do anything for me - now I have bubbled up gauge faces, and the low gas light has been constantly on for years.

  8. #23
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: Splines

    Originally posted by K75Scape
    I bought my 1987 k75s new, the dealer has told me to have the splines lubed every year! I think that's rediculous. I also complained since week one about moisture in the gauges, they consistenly refused to do anything for me - now I have bubbled up gauge faces, and the low gas light has been constantly on for years.
    OK - nice that you could vent.

    And glad to see you're still enjoying the bike 16 years later despite your problems. My first thought after reading your message about the dealer refusing to help you was why didn't you contact another dealer or BMW-NA while the bike was under warranty?

    IF you have more than 20k on the K75 and you never experienced a clutch spline failure and you switch to Honda Moly-60 lube - you can easily go 30k between lube intervals. If that's a years riding - good for'ya..

    I think your dealer was trying to save you an on-road breakdown by being conservative in his spline lube interval - but using the old BMW lube (#10) he wasn't being awfully conservative.

    As far as the moisture in the gauges - this can be fixed, but since you're well out of warranty - it might be worth your fixing it yourself.

    You can find clues on how to do this on the Internet BMW Riders website. While doing it - you might do the contact enhancements inside the pod - which may fix your low gas light. I'm not gonna go into the how-to on these items since they are well known issues and well documented elsewhere.

    Or you can take the light out and install a Fuel+ while you have the pod apart.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

  9. #24
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    www.ibmwr.org

    Check the Ktech articles and you should find what you need to get your gauges squared away.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  10. #25
    On the Road 171374's Avatar
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    newer K

    I have a '99 K1200LT ......I'm thinking that this same thing needs done to the newer K's as well . Is the procedure pretty much the same as on the K1100's?(like listed on IBMWR's site) mine has about 67k on it and still shift real smooth , sounds like a good winter project? what do you guys think
    thanks

  11. #26
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Re: newer K

    Originally posted by zzkvsl
    I have a '99 K1200LT ......I'm thinking that this same thing needs done to the newer K's as well . Is the procedure pretty much the same as on the K1100's?(like listed on IBMWR's site) mine has about 67k on it and still shift real smooth , sounds like a good winter project? what do you guys think
    thanks
    AFAIK... there is no regular spline lube interval service requirement for the newer K bikes. It appears BMW has gotten these right finally.

    If it ain't broke..
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders
    '12 R1200R - I love this bike!

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