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Thread: Winter Storage my K75

  1. #1
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Winter Storage my K75

    Hi Gang,

    It looks like the cold weather won out my race to get my K75 self-serviced and accessorized in time for a fall color ride. I've mad a lot of progress but some of my parts - heated grips, risers, aux. power outlet were mis-shipped to another person so I'm a couple weeks late.

    Really, no big deal as I've got my F650 to ride. So, here's my question.

    What happens if I leave the tank off the bike and store it in my basement? It has just a little bit of gas in it. I could also take out my new Westco battery and store that inside too.

    This way, over the winter I'll have time to shop for driving lights and emergency 4 way flashers and finish it up before replacing the tank. The bike will be covered in my garage for the winter.

    Any thoughts or suggestions?

    Thanks as always,

    Ken

  2. #2
    kayseventyfive
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    Quote Originally Posted by kentuvman View Post
    Hi Gang,


    What happens if I leave the tank off the bike and store it in my basement? It has just a little bit of gas in it. I could also take out my new Westco battery and store that inside too.



    Any thoughts or suggestions?



    Ken
    Tank: Empty it. Gas that sits does bad things to fuel pumps and rubber. Gas in basement is not very safe, either, what with furnaces, water heaters, whatever.

    I hate to say this, but even sitting dry can make a fuel pump unhappy. Maybe every month or two, give the pump a second of 12 volts just to keep it free. My BMW shop says all of the pump problems they see are the result of sitting. When I take my annual two month absence, I pour a little Marvel Mystery Oil in the tank for its final ride, just to add a little lube.

    Battery: Warm basement is better than cold outside, but the battery should get a trickle charge now and then or be on a battery maintainer of some kind to avoid the sulfation that is the inevitable result of sitting.

    I have made up a cord with clips on one end and a cig lighter cord on the other. I use it to take my lesser-used batteries for a ride now and then. They like it.

  3. #3
    Registered User
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    Just push the bike in the living room. Keeps the varmits from setting up shop on the bike and really saves on the stuff that cold and UV's attack. JON

  4. #4
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Hi Jon - my wife will really love that!!! Kids for sure - wife, questionable!

  5. #5
    Rally Rat
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    On my K, I fill the tank to the top and add Seafoam. The battery stays on the bike with a trickle charger.

    I try to ride the bike every month or two at a minimum. This keeps the fuel injectors working and clean.

    I understand empty gas tanks should be treated with fogging oil before storage.

  6. #6
    kayseventyfive
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoridog View Post

    I understand empty gas tanks should be treated with fogging oil before storage.

    Steel tanks, for sure.

    .

  7. #7

    Winnter storage

    First off I know your winters are much more severe in Minneapolis than here in St Louis. I have never had a problem when spring freedom arrives, and its time to start riding again. First off I always have my bike hooked up to a charger in summer or winter. Then I always have it covered in the garage if it will sit for a few days or more. Then I always start the bike and let it warm up to normal temperatures (about 15 minutes) at least once a week. That means opening the garage door and moving the bike to the door and starting it. And dont forget to make sure you have good ventilation. You might want to actually back it out of the garage completely. My garage opens at both ends, so I can open it up and get air moving through while running the bike. Prior to starting it in the winter time I might put a can of heat under the engine to give it a little pre-warm up. It takes about a half an hour a week to insure the bike is kept up to riding standards. I have never had leaky seals, bad gas, etc, etc, in the spring time. Good luck, and keep it tween the ditches.

  8. #8
    Registered User Beemer01's Avatar
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    Hmmm - Suggest you let her rest.

    My experience has been that starting it up and running every few weeks or so on a K bike in winter storage.... is a bad idea.

    All Ks have a sprag clutch. This is lubed - from what I can tell - by well agitated oil splashing on it. Idling does not seem to do it.

    On my ancient 85 K, the PO did the weekly start thing... my sprag clutch got stuck as a direct result.

    Unsticking a stuck sprag clutch is a very hit or miss proposition. You don't want to be doing it.

    For winter storage, I change all the oils and filter, add stabil to a full tank of gas, go for a hot ride, hook up the charger .... and say good night.

    If the gods of winter smile and it does stay warm and snow free enough - any rides I do are many miles at speed... not around the block!

  9. #9

    Winter care

    Sprang clutches will tend to rust and cause problems (starter problems) with moister. Its believed caused usually by winter riding of short duration. However, of the many BMW K bikes out there and the varied mileage on each one of them its hard to say if yours is going to have the problem. Sometimes 85 an earlier model K100s would have a problem, but later models had different Sprag set ups which tend to correct the problem. Its your bike and you decision. I prefer to keep it in running order, the risk is very small of a sprag hang up due to running it weekly. Again, just my opinion, and nothing more.

  10. #10
    Back to the original question.

    Before you empty the tank add several tablespoons of ordinary motor oil and run the fuel pump briefly. Then dump the tank to dry.

    The oil will cling in the internals of the pump, keeping it quite happy, and will easily wash out in the first few seconds in the spring when you revive the bike from storage.

    At least, that's what I would do.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  11. #11
    mrich12000
    Guest
    Many years of adding Stabil fuel treatment. (napa)Oil change(Amsoil)(BMW oil filter) battery on a tender
    bike off the Ground and on jacks. Covered. Thatl do ya mate..

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by mrich12000 View Post
    Many years of adding Stabil fuel treatment. (napa)Oil change(Amsoil)(BMW oil filter) battery on a tender
    bike off the Ground and on jacks. Covered. Thatl do ya mate..
    Oh, I agree with the wisdom that it is best to store the bike with the fuel tank full with Stabil added - if you are parking your bike for the winter.

    But he has the bike apart, the fuel tank off and essentially empty, in his basement. Not a good place to store a tank full of fuel. So how does he protect the fuel pump. That is the essence of the question, and Amsoil in the crankcase and a battery tender on the battery does not one even little thing to protect the fuel pump in his situation.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  13. #13
    mrich12000
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    I know. guess I should read thouroghly and get my glasses rechecked paul thanks. time to get out of this office and put on the rain suit. see ya later..Michael

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by mrich12000 View Post
    I know. guess I should read thouroghly and get my glasses rechecked paul thanks. time to get out of this office and put on the rain suit. see ya later..Michael
    Go ride before it gets wet, cold, snowy, and windy up there!! "It" will be there before we know it, won't "it"?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  15. #15
    I can store mine in "active storage" for years at a time, ie run it every summer and then put it back in storage for winter. My garage is cold and damp, so before each winter I:

    * park it over a plastic sheet covered by an old rug
    * give it a complete wipe down and waxing,
    * change the oil and filter,
    * make sure the coolant/antifreeze is up to snuff and levels are good,
    * fill the tank to the rim with stablised fuel and let the bike run for a while before shutting it down,
    * "fog" the cylinders and turn the engine over by hand, ie plugs out, bike in 5th,
    * remove battery and Motronic computer and store in basement, 4 - 6 hours on a 1 amp trickle charger per 2-3 week period,
    * plug the exhaust and intakes with oiled paper towels and masking tape, ie a barriers against critters or cold moisture laden air,
    * decompress the rear shock,
    * block up the engine so the front wheel is just off the ground,
    * take tire pressures down to 20-25 psi
    * cover with a cotton sheet
    * leave it til spring.

    I've had the bike for 9 seasons and just replaced the battery this year, and it's always fired right up come spring.

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