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Thread: 1987 a Good Year for a K75S?

  1. #1
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    1987 a Good Year for a K75S?

    Hello fellow enthusiasts - I'm in contact with a seller with a K75S with 30K miles in the 3-4k price range. It has luggage, corbin seat, tall windscreen but non abs, no heated grips or throttlemeister - not the orginal owner and does not have all maintenance records.

    What is my best way to proceed if I like it - do I need to get it checked by a mechanic or bring a compression tester? What's strange is he has an extra engine and generator just in case which is included in the sale.

    Your thoughts always appreciated. I currently own an '03 F650GS and want another bike for longer rides. I like the 1200 GS but after reading so many threads on the K75's it seems like I should check it out. It sounds like coveted swift and sleek "V" Tail Beech Bonanza among flying enthusiasts.

    Thanks much,

    Ken

  2. #2
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    correction

    tOops - he extra engine and generator is NOT included in the sale.

  3. #3
    TESLAESQUE
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    you should check the past threads in this topic...because there are some good ones about how to check a K75. however...

    compression isn't such an issue on these. if you REALLY want to know whats up with it, look at the rear splines on the driveshaft and the final drive unit, and look to make sure there's no oil where the engine meets the tranny.

    where are you (and the bike) located?

  4. #4
    Mars needs women! 35634's Avatar
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    21 year old bike with 30k may have storage issues, like corroded brake parts,
    fuel injectors gunked up, old tires (even with good tread) funky electrical connections,
    etc. Usual stuff for any bike or car. Mods from previous owners can be a nightmare also.
    Instrument pod is a big bugaboo, the bike may have higher mileage and the pod was
    replaced.
    (PS 87 was a GREAT year for the K75S)

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  6. #6
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Thanks for your replies so far - the guy doesn't have knowledge of repairs and history and I just read the thread on Ted's how to buy a used BMW - I think I'll just wait it out for one with a good lineage of maintenance history.

  7. #7
    Registered User Beemer01's Avatar
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    Kent -

    Where is the bike? Occasionally a MOA member can help out with an inspection. Finding a 20+ year old bike with good maintenance records will be hard.

    $3K would be on the high end pricewise btw.

  8. #8
    93 K1100RS & 81 R100RS
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    K75

    +1
    That IS on the high side.
    I'm on my second K100RS this year.
    First one from GA, 1994, only 12,000 miles, paid $4,800. #2 bike is a 93 with 24,000 miles, paid $5,400 a bit high, but bike is BEAUTIFUL, and I had some insurance $ to play with.
    Moved up from am 81 R100RS with 138,000 on it, still have & love it too. Just been riding the snot outta the K. Addicting power, ABS brakes, yes they work, low profile Michelin radials.
    The K75's are supposed to be smoother than the K1100RS's. Mine is a little buzzy, but I am getting it smoother all the time adjusting the throttle bodies & new plugs ect.
    Watch the brakes!!! BMW's all years LIKE the brake fluid changed. Neglect at your own risk!!!
    I just rebuilt the front master cylinder this past weekend, and now I need to do the back too. There's a seal around the acuating rod off the brake lever that is supposed to keep out water & road crud. Poor fit in my estimation, so upon reassembly after the rebuild, I used Permatex gaesket seal around the perimeter and let it dry all night to make a good seal. Had to dress the bore too as it was pitted.
    If you do not ride two up, the K75's have plenty of power.
    Don't pay more than the blue book UNLESS it is perfect!!!!!

    There are lots out there, keep looking and for $3 - $4 K you can step into the mid 90's.

  9. #9
    BUDDINGGEEZER
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    A 21 year old bike isn't going to have a long list of service records. It's only had 1,400 mile average per year. Not riding is almost as hard as riding on a vehicle.

    I can tell with a five mile ride if a bike is good or not. I don't need nor care for service records. 30K on a brick engine is just broken in.

    I do tell people that if you can't work on your own motorcycle, buy new. A 1987 isn't worth what you would have to spend at a dealer to do a proper 21 year low milage service.

    I have had 2 1987 low mileage K bikes and id did not cost me much to go through the bikes from servicing steering bearings to servicing the final drives and all in between, it did take a lot of time. Several thousand dollars if done at a dealer.

    I just sold a K100LT that had 43K, but I put 23K on it the last 20 months. It needed a lot more work at 20K than 43K. Look for a bike that has been ridden.

    Ralph Sims

  10. #10
    Tom Mieczkowski mieczkow's Avatar
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    K75S Purchase

    I have a 1987 K75S I bought a few years ago with a little less than 30k, pretty good service records, and in very nice shape but not perfect. Most of what I have to say is extracted from all the sentiments expressed here:

    1. A K75 at that mileage is barely broken in and unless it has been abused it's unimagineable that the engine is going to fail, etc. A compression check will tell the basic tale. And if it's not leaking fluid, the chances are very small that there are some major problems.

    2. A lot of owners (myself included) do their own maintenance and repairs - so you will not always have dealer-type receipts to document the history of an excellent and lovingly cared-for bike. You have to rely on other variables - the appearance and condition of the bike as it presents itself, the claims, attitude and demeanor of the owner, etc. I bought mine on the internet and did not physically see the bike until I droe up to Savannah - I had an hour or so to inspect it and to talk with the owner. I drove it a bit in order to to check it out and (as it turned out) buy it. To some extent there will always be a bit of risk in buying a used anything. Be realistic in what level of "assurance" you can reasonably expect....

    3. In general I always argue that if you are not mechanically inclined and do not want to invest a LOT of money in a dealer doing all the work on your bike then as one post said "buy a new one". A BMW, like any other relatively exotic machine (I own a 1989 Lotus Esprit as well) will kill your pocketbook if you're an ordinary joe finance-wise. To me I love working on my old bike and my old Lotus. Even then, parts are not cheap, but it's really expensive if you need to get it to a dealer to do everything. And if you're mechincally skilled you can do a better job of assesing any used machinery.

    4. I've had 4 beemers and never owned a new one - most have been 10 -15 years old when I bought them. I've never had a major problem.

    5. On the K75S (I paid $2,600) I found the splines to be excellent, the brakes needed some work (squeaking/pulsing), and a few very minor electrical issues. Since I purchased it I've put 10k on the bike, never had a single serious mechanical issue. I replaced the rotors and pads, misc. lights in the instrument cluster, rebuilt the front calipers (they really didn't need it but since the rotors were off I thought I'd do it since it seemed opportune), replaced the front fork seals (one was leaking - my fault - long story), did a spline lube, put a stainless steel fastener kit in place on the engine, did tires, converted to low seat, put on "C" bars and bar backs, new grips, Aeroflow windscreen, new locksets on the luggage, and I am waiting for the parts to do a rebuild on the rear master cylinder. I do all fluid changes myself, and have preventively changed out a few gaskets here and there - usually when I had things apart for one reason or another. I doubt I've spent $1,000 in parts. Most people who see the bike and don't know beemers assume it is a brand new motorcycle when they look at it.

    6. I am a believer that generally you cannot go wrong with a K75 - and the safest thing to do is that if you have no experience with them get someone to look at it that you trust. Most people who own BMW's take very good care of them.
    Tom Mieczkowski
    1987 K75S

  11. #11
    Maine Rider cayuse60's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kentuvman View Post
    ...It sounds like coveted swift and sleek "V" Tail Beech Bonanza among flying enthusiasts.

    Thanks much,

    Ken

    Good analogy; the K75 is a fine machine.
    Tim
    1997 K1100 LT
    " If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there." And that is OK with me

  12. #12
    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    Inspected & Test Rode the bike

    I like it a lot - took it for a ride on the freeway @ she runs really nice. Everything is in good shape for her age. On way back from ride, speedo needle went to zero but odometer kept working - any thoughts on what the remedy is?

    Everything works - turn signals, horn, brake lights and fluids need changing. Only thing I have left to do is remove rear wheel and inspect splines.

    Seller is asking $3300 and bike has a corbin seat. What would be a reasonable offer for a 1987 with 30k miles on it?

    Thanks for all your advice.

    Ken

  13. #13
    Rally Rat
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    The speedo is normal for these bikes. I hear about these issues very often. i have an R90 with a bad speedo and instead, I use a Garmin 60CSx as my speedo. They run for about $350 but worth it since I also use it for all of my vehicles including fishing and kayaking.
    I find the price a bit on the high end. Then again, with these gas prices, bikes have become popular and the market has inflated the prices. I know I would not sell my K75 for less than $2,500. In fact, I probably would not sell mine for $3,500 just because of how much I do like this bike.
    Other than splines, fuel pump and possibly some electrical gremlins due to old age, K75's are known the be the best BMW bikes to ride regardless of maintanance neglect. Still, They should NEVER be neglected.

  14. #14
    Registered User Beemer01's Avatar
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    Bid -

    I'd offer $2500.00 and settle at $2600.00.

    Repairing the Speedo is not cheap, and I'm not sure who even does these repairs any more. You're probably going to wind up buying one on eBay and paying several hundred. Installation is easy however.

  15. #15
    3 Red Bricks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beemer01 View Post
    I'd offer $2500.00 and settle at $2600.00.

    Repairing the Speedo is not cheap, and I'm not sure who even does these repairs any more. You're probably going to wind up buying one on eBay and paying several hundred. Installation is easy however.
    Installation on an S is quite a bit more involved because of the fairing.

    There are a multitude of articles on fixing early K-bike speedometers at: http://ibmwr.org/ktech.shtml

    Ss around here go for $2500-$4500 depending on condition.

    Third generation luggage (the ones with the scuff pads and the roundel is above the reflector instead of next to it) makes it more valuable because they are the only ones that you can put a full face helmet in.

    I am kind of partial to the '87 because of the silver wheels and driveline.

    Don't think "it's in good shape for its age" either it's in good shape or it isn't.


    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

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