Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Any Tips for steering head bearing replacement?

  1. #1
    Rally Rat
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santa Barbara CA, about 90 mi North of LA.
    Posts
    220

    Cool Any Tips for steering head bearing replacement?

    I have homed in on the problem that causes a low speed bar wobble, the steering head bearing has a worn spot. So now I'm going th replace it. If there is an easy and a hard way, I'm hoping to go the easy route . I have a book, and I'm not worried about getting this done, just interested in "Dos and Don'ts". KC

  2. #2
    johnpeter
    Guest

    Why start another thread?


  3. #3
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    3,322
    Quote Originally Posted by KCKBMOA View Post
    I have homed in on the problem that causes a low speed bar wobble, the steering head bearing has a worn spot. So now I'm going th replace it. If there is an easy and a hard way, I'm hoping to go the easy route . I have a book, and I'm not worried about getting this done, just interested in "Dos and Don'ts". KC
    Assuming this is a K-bike, the process can be pretty straight forward. If your bearings are notched (that worn spot) then you will need to change both top and bottom bearings. The inner race of the top bearing comes out as you disassemble the fork head. The the inner race on the bottom is pressed onto the lower triple clamp shaft and is best taken to some one (local dealer?) who can pull it and press on the replacement with the correct tools. There is a metal dust cover that goes between the bottom inner race and the triple clamp - get a new one of those because the old one will likely be damaged when the bearing is removed.

    The outer races can be tapped out of the fork head if you have a long rod or tool that can catch the inner edges of the races. There is a land (edge) with gaps in it that the races seat against. With the proper tool you can catch the exposed edge of the race (going at the top race from blow and vice versa) and tap it out (go around the race to move it evenly). I put the new races in the freezer (in a plastic bag) overnight and then use one of the old outer races to tap them in.

    A K75 has some other steps because of the FluidBlock internal damper.
    Greg Feeler
    BMW MOA Foundation Secretary, Ambassador & amateur K-Bike collector, it seems
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •