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Thread: Tire Pressure Monitor Battery

  1. #1
    gulfcoastbeemer
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    Tire Pressure Monitor Battery

    I have an '07 R1200RT with the BMW Tire Pressure Monitor System (TPMS).

    The TPMS is working flawlessly; however, it's time for me to mount new tires, and, as the bike has over 24,000 miles on the odometer, possibly renew the batteries within the TPMS sensor/sending unit found within each wheel.

    Does anyone have any experience with replacement of these batteries?

    What battery is used? Is it a generic, readily available button battery?

    How is replacement achieved?

    After how many miles was replacement necessary?

  2. #2
    On the Road BigAdv's Avatar
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    The batt.s are quite expensive, about $100.00 but they do come with new sensors. They are a none serviceable part, if the batt. dies, you have to get a new sensor. They are 'supposed' to last 5 to 7 years.

    Earl

  3. #3
    gulfcoastbeemer
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by BigAdv View Post
    The batt.s are quite expensive, about $100.00 but they do come with new sensors. They are a none serviceable part, if the batt. dies, you have to get a new sensor. They are 'supposed' to last 5 to 7 years.

    Earl
    Thanks for the info Earl.

    WOW, that seems like a weird maintenance strategy from the standpoint of an owner!

    I bet this can only be done by a BMW dealer as the new battery/sensor has to be "paired" with a particular bike's computer! Right?

    Of course, "years" doesn't equate to "miles". Just like "shelf-life" doesn't equate to "service-life". My understanding is the sending unit is switched on by centrifugal force as the wheel reaches a certain speed. Ergo, non-spinning wheel equates to "shelf-life"; spinning wheel equates to "service-life".

    Five year of riding might equate to 12,000 for some people, and 120,000 for others. (Your mileage may vary.)

    [Don, you must be thrilled with your decision to go "after-market" battery-less TPM!?]

  4. #4
    Republic of Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by gulfcoastbeemer View Post
    WOW, that seems like a weird maintenance strategy from the standpoint of an owner!
    No kidding. But apparently no where near as weird as expecting the owner to learn how to use a $20 digital tire pressure gauge to check tire pressures before every ride. Now, THAT would just be too weird!
    Mike White
    MOA Life Time Member #57882
    '13 K1300S "30 Years", '95 R1100RS, '88 K75S, '97 Ducati 916, '95 Ducati 900SS CR. Gone, but not forgotten, '75 R90S

  5. #5
    gulfcoastbeemer
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by BeemerMike View Post
    No kidding. But apparently no where near as weird as expecting the owner to learn how to use a $20 digital tire pressure gauge to check tire pressures before every ride. Now, THAT would just be too weird!
    Cute.

    The TPMS was on the bike when I bought off the dealer showroom floor. Having never experienced a TPMS, I wouldn't have ordered the bike with it. Now, after 25,000+ miles, I wouldn't think of buying an RT without one.

    I've found the TPMS to be a valuable safety feature -- but, it doesn't replace a tire gauge. I still check my tire pressure with a tire pressure gauge before I ride, as the TPMS does begin to function until you are underway.

    The TPMS is dynamic by nature. If you pickup a small nail, and the pressure slowly drops, the TPMS will tell you while you are riding and otherwise unaware of impending doom.

    I check my tire pressure with a digital gauge more frequently than you might imagine; yet, I still haven't found a way to fit that tire gauge to the valve stem of a wheel spinning at highway speeds.

  6. #6
    Republic of Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by gulfcoastbeemer View Post
    I've found the TPMS to be a valuable safety feature
    No doubt that a TPMS provides added safety to warn you of lowering tire pressure that occurs in between your manual checks (e.g., a puncture while riding). Unfortunately, I see a lot of people who feel that once they have a TPMS, there is no longer any need to manually check their tire pressures, especially on cars and trucks, and so they pay even less attention to the condition of their vehicle than they did before. Of course, I also see people driving around with a half-inflated tire . . . seemingly oblivious to the fact. Not good.
    Mike White
    MOA Life Time Member #57882
    '13 K1300S "30 Years", '95 R1100RS, '88 K75S, '97 Ducati 916, '95 Ducati 900SS CR. Gone, but not forgotten, '75 R90S

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