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Thread: Canada recognition;

  1. #31
    mrich12000
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    Quote Originally Posted by petepeterson View Post
    Oh great!!! Giving the Canadians a flag to wave is like giving a kid with bad acne a steroid shot....................... ...............Pete


    we can do it again...

    EyeWitnesstoHistory.com
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    The British Burn Washington, 1814
    August of 1814 was one of the hottest in the memory of the approximately 8,000 residents of America's new capital. The sweltering, humid heat turned the stagnate marshes surrounding the city into thriving hatcheries for disease-carrying mosquitoes. To make matters worse, the city found itself the target of an invading British army slowly making its way from the Chesapeake Bay.
    America had been at war with the British Empire since 1812, but the action so far had consisted of a series of indeterminate skirmishes along the Great Lakes region. With the defeat of Napoleon, the Empire turned its full attention to its former colony sending its battle-hardened troops to squash the up-start Americans. Washington had little strategic value - the thriving port of Baltimore was much more important. However, as capital of the nation, the British hoped that its burning would have a psychological impact on the will of the Americans to continue the conflict.

    As the British army of approximately 4,000 approached, the majority of Washington residents fled the city. On August 24th American defenders, with President James Madison in attendance, were quickly routed by the invaders in a battle at Bladensburg a few miles from the city. A messenger was dispatched to the White House to warn First Lady Dolly Madison of the impeding arrival of the British. She and her staff fled by carriage across the Potomac - taking with her the full-length portrait of George Washington that had been torn from a White House wall.

    That evening, the vanguard of the British army reached Capitol Hill and began its systematic destruction of all public buildings in the city.

    "All thoughts of accommodation were instantly set aside"

    George Gleig was part of the British force that attacked and burned Washington. Too small in size to effectively occupy the city - their intent was to cause as much damage as they could. We join Gelig's story as the British send a truce party to negotiate with the Americans:

    "Such being the intention of General Ross, he did not march the troops immediately into the city, but halted them upon a plain in its immediate vicinity, whilst a flag of truce was sent in with terms. But whatever his proposal might have been, it was not so much as heard, for scarcely had the party bearing the flag entered the street, than they were fired upon from the windows of one of the houses, and the horse of the General himself, who accompanied them, killed. You will easily believe that conduct so unjustifiable, so direct a breach of the law of nations, roused the indignation of every individual, from the General himself down to the private soldier.

    All thoughts of accommodation were instantly laid aside; the troops advanced forthwith into the town, and having first put to the sword all who were found in the house from which the shots were fired, and reduced it to ashes, they proceeded, without 'a moment's delay, to burn and destroy everything in the most distant degree connected with government. In this general devastation were included the Senate House, the President's palace, an extensive dockyard and arsenal, barracks for two or three thousand men, several large storehouses filled with naval and military stores, some hundreds of cannon of different descriptions, and nearly twenty thousand stand of small arms. There were also two or three public rope works which shared the same fate, a fine frigate pierced for sixty guns and just ready to be launched, several gun brigs and armed schooners, with a variety of gunboats and small craft. The powder magazines were, of course, set on fire, and exploded with a tremendous crash, throwing down many houses in their vicinity, partly by pieces of the wall striking them, and partly by the concussion of the air whilst quantities of shot, shell, and hand grenades, which could not otherwise be rendered useless, were thrown into the river."

    "The sky was brilliantly illuminated"

    While Gleig's regiment was sacking the city, the remainder of the British force marched into the American capital as night approached:

    "... the blazing of houses, ships, and stores, the report of exploding magazines, and the crash of falling roofs informed them, as they proceeded, of what was going forward. You can conceive nothing finer than the sight which met them as they drew near to the town. The sky was brilliantly illuminated by the different conflagrations, and a dark red light was thrown upon the road, sufficient to permit each man to view distinctly his comrade's face.

    ...When the detachment sent out to destroy Mr. Madison's house entered his dining parlor, they found a dinner table spread and covers laid for forty guests. Several kinds of wine, in handsome cut glass decanters, were cooling on the sideboard; plate holders stood by the fireplace, filled with dishes and plates; knives, forks, and spoons were arranged for immediate use; in short, everything was ready for the entertainment of a ceremonious party. Such were the arrangements in the dining room, whilst in the kitchen were others answerable to them in every respect. Spits, loaded with joints of various sorts, turned before the fire; pots, saucepans, and other culinary utensils stood upon the grate; and all the other requisites for an elegant and substantial repast were exactly in a state which indicated that they had been lately and precipitately abandoned.

    You will readily imagine that these preparations were beheld by a party of hungry soldiers with no indifferent eye. An elegant dinner, even though considerably overdressed, was a luxury to which few of them, at least for some time back, had been accustomed, and which, after the dangers and fatigues of the day, appeared peculiarly inviting. They sat down to it, therefore, not indeed in the most orderly manner, but with countenances which would not have disgraced a party of aldermen at a civic feast, and, having satisfied their appetites with fewer complaints than would have probably escaped their rival gourmands, and partaken pretty freely of the wines, they finished by setting fire to the house which had so liberally entertained them.

    ...Of the Senate house, the President's palace, the barracks, the dockyard, etc., nothing could be seen except heaps of smoking ruins."

    References:
    Gleig, George Robert, A History of the Campaigns of the British at Washington and New Orleans (1826), reprinted in Commager, Henry Steele and Allan Nevins The Heritage of America (1939); Lloyd, Alan, The Scorching of Washington (1974); Seale, William The President's House, Vol. I (1986).

    How To Cite This Article:
    "The British Burn Washington, DC, 1814," EyeWitness to History, eyewitnesstohistory.com (2003).
    The British boasted that, if captured, they would parade Dolly Madison through the streets of London as a prisoner of war.
    General Robert Ross, British commander of the force that sacked Washington, was killed a few days later in the battle for Baltimore.
    The battle at Baltimore's Fort McHenry in September inspired Francis Scott Key to write the Star Spangled Banner
    Last edited by mrich12000; 03-11-2008 at 02:58 AM.

  2. #32
    Amma Holly's Avatar
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    Tit for Tat

    It was revenge for the burning of York, including the Parliament buildings, in April, 1813.


    Don't mess with us, especially once we're on flag-waving steroids.

    Holly

  3. #33
    mrich12000
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    YOU TRLL EM HOLLY!!!!

  4. #34
    Amma Holly's Avatar
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    Shhhhhh

    You weren't supposed to tell them that. If they know we have oil as well as water, they'll invade again.

    Holly

  5. #35
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrich12000 View Post
    YOU TRLL EM HOLLY!!!!


    I'm a big Holly fan.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    You weren't supposed to tell them that. If they know we have oil as well as water, they'll invade again.

    Holly
    Don't think we don't already have our eyes on those "oil sands" of yours....

  7. #37
    glennhendricks
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    Dollar for dollar

    Yup, that whole 'letting the CAN$ get to parity' is a cunning plan.
    While everyone comes south to buy stuff we're going to move in.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    It was revenge for the burning of York, including the Parliament buildings, in April, 1813.


    Don't mess with us, especially once we're on flag-waving steroids.

    Holly

    Surrender flag please.

  9. #39
    mrich12000
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    Nice flag EH:

  10. #40
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Be nice guys or they might not let US back for the 08 edition of the Salty Fog Rally in Nova Scotia.


  11. #41
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    So glad:)

    I started the post this time around and so glad to see the "Maple Leaf" available now, for those so willing to fly it. Our posts can only be more beautiful with our Canadian brethren represented here and their colors. I recently had the opportunity to ride Canada, coast to coast two years ago, for a first for me. I had visited so many provinces before, but never a coast to coast ride. The Canada Flag flies proudly at so many homes, businesses up there, with the exception of Quebec of course. I was happy to see the Maple Leaf so frequently at so many places, flying proudly. Thanks for listening from one USA, 'MOA poster. Randy13233"Polarbear"

  12. #42
    mrich12000
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBasa View Post


    I'm a big Holly fan.

    Me to she's great at the Trenton Rally. Hi Holly We miss you. Loonie-Tics Seya in August.Michael

  13. #43
    bored, bored ... dlowry's Avatar
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    Sweet! We gotz our own smiley now Pass me my steroids and acne cream, I'm playing baseball this summer...
    Dave...
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    15 R1200 RT, 12 G650GS
    83 Suzuki XN85 D Turbo

  14. #44
    mrich12000
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    So thank you for the new imocon fag.

    So in the good spirit of brotherhood we can now sing'' sing'

    Oh Im a lumberjack and im ok......
    No realy here is a great tune.. and you may have to know it for the Salty one


    Official Lyrics of O Canada!
    O Canada!
    Our home and native land!
    True patriot love in all thy sons command.

    With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
    The True North strong and free!

    From far and wide,
    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

    God keep our land glorious and free!
    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.




    The History of the National Anthem
    Summary


    "O Canada" was proclaimed Canada's national anthem on July 1, 1980, 100 years after it was first sung on June 24, 1880. The music was composed by Calixa Lavall?容, a well-known composer; French lyrics to accompany the music were written by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier. The song gained steadily in popularity. Many English versions have appeared over the years. The version on which the official English lyrics are based was written in 1908 by Mr. Justice Robert Stanley Weir. The official English version includes changes recommended in 1968 by a Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons. The French lyrics remain unaltered.



    Full History of "O Canada"


    Many people think of Calixa Lavall?容 as an obscure music teacher who dashed off a patriotic song in a moment of inspiration. The truth is quite different. Lavall?容 was, in fact, known as "Canada's national musician" and it was on this account that he was asked to compose the music for a poem written by Judge Adolphe-Basile Routhier.



    The occasion was the "Congr?窺 national des Canadiens-Fran?榮is" in1880, which was being held at the same time as the St. Jean-Baptiste Day celebrations.

    There had been some thought of holding a competition for a national hymn to have its first performance on St. Jean-Baptiste Day, June 24, but by January the committee in charge decided there was not enough time, so the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, the Honourable Th?峨dore Robitaille, commissioned Judge Routhier to write a hymn and Lavall?容 to compose the tune. Lavall?容 made a number of drafts before the tune we know was greeted with enthusiasm by his musical friends. It is said that in the excitement of success Lavall?容 rushed to show his music to the Lieutenant Governor without even stopping to sign the manuscript.

    The first performance took place on June 24, 1880 at a banquet in the "Pavillon des Patineurs" in Quebec City as the climax of a"Mosa?裹ue sur des airs populaires canadiens" arranged by Joseph V?弱ina, a prominent composer and bandmaster.

    Although this first performance of "O Canada" with Routhier's French words was well received on the evening, it does not seem to have made a lasting impression at that time. Arthur Lavigne, a Quebec musician and music dealer, published it without copyright but there was no rush to reprint. Lavall?容's obit in 1891 doesn't mention it among his accomplishments, nor does a biography of Judge Routhier published in 1898. French Canada is represented in the 1887 edition of the University of Toronto song book by "Vive la canadienne", "A la claire fontaine" and "Un canadien errant".

    English Canada in general probably first heard "O Canada" when school children sang it when the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall (later King George V and Queen Mary) toured Canada in 1901. Five years later Whaley and Royce in Toronto published the music with the French text and a translation into English made by Dr. Thomas Bedford Richardson, a Toronto doctor. The Mendelssohn Choir used the Richardson lyrics in one of their performances about this time and Judge Routhier and the French press complimented the author.



    Richardson version:
    O Canada! Our fathers' land of old
    Thy brow is crown'd with leaves of red and gold.
    Beneath the shade of the Holy Cross
    Thy children own their birth
    No stains thy glorious annals gloss
    Since valour shield thy hearth.
    Almighty God! On thee we call
    Defend our rights, forfend this nation's thrall,
    Defend our rights, forfend this nation's thrall.

    In 1908 Collier's Weekly inaugurated its Canadian edition with a competition for an English text to Lavall?容's music. It was won by Mercy E. Powell McCulloch, but her version did not take.



    McCulloch version :
    O Canada! in praise of thee we sing;
    From echoing hills our anthems proudly ring.
    With fertile plains and mountains grand
    With lakes and rivers clear,
    Eternal beauty, thos dost stand
    Throughout the changing year.
    Lord God of Hosts! We now implore
    Bless our dear land this day and evermore,
    Bless our dear land this day and evermore.

    Since then many English versions have been written for "O Canada". Poet Wilfred Campbell wrote one. So did Augustus Bridle, Toronto critic. Some were written for the 1908 tercentenary of Quebec City. One version became popular in British Columbia...
    And there is a little diddy "The maple leaf forever.."





  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by mrich12000 View Post
    So thank you for the new imocon flag.

    So in the good spirit of brotherhood we can now sing'' sing'

    Oh Im a lumberjack and im ok......
    No realy here is a great tune.. and you may have to know it for the Salty one


    Official Lyrics of O Canada!
    O Canada!
    Our home and native land!
    True patriot love in all thy sons command.

    With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
    The True North strong and free!

    From far and wide,
    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

    God keep our land glorious and free!
    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

    From The Simpsons "Bart of War":

    Sideshow Mel: Let us end this mindless violence and join our hands in song.
    Captain McCallister: Aye, Not a hymn to war, like our national anthem, but a sweet, soothing hymn, like the national anthem of Canada.堌




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