Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Replacing clutch cable

  1. #1
    sumran
    Guest

    Replacing clutch cable

    I got part way to work this morning and the clutch action didn't feel right. When I checked things out, I found the cable was coming apart where the cable attaches to the barrel on hand lever end. I'll be picking up a BMW cable later today.

    I would expect the installation to be a fairly easy job. Are there any install or adjustment tips or pitfalls I should know about?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by sumran; 01-09-2008 at 05:53 PM.

  2. #2
    buckeyeclark
    Guest

    Cable

    Not sure about the R100; however, when I changed out the clutch cable on my
    K100 the biggest issue was running the cable back under the gas tank. I found that cutting the end connection off the old cable and taping the end of the new cable to it was the best way I could figure out short of removing the gas tank. I am sure you will get better advice then this shortly.....

  3. #3
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    6,285
    Don't pull out the old one before you run the new one alongside.

    Memory, you know.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  4. #4
    Little Egypt Airheads
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Beautiful Southern Illinois
    Posts
    160
    Quote Originally Posted by sumran View Post
    I got part way to work this morning and the clutch action didn't feel right. When I checked things out, I found the cable was coming apart where the cable attaches to the barrel on hand lever end. I'll be picking up a BMW cable later today.

    I would expect the installation to a fairly easy job. Are there any install or adjustment tips or pitfalls I should know about?

    Thanks.


    It's not hard at all. It's best to remove the gas tank, though. Other than that, remember that the new cable will need to be adjusted after installation. The bolt/lock nut on the pivot at the back of the tranny provides gross adjustment (i.e. a little change makes a big difference). The adjuster at the handlebar provides fine adjustment to get it just right.

  5. #5
    sumran
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by lbrackr756 View Post
    [/B]

    It's best to remove the gas tank, though...
    While I have that off I will install the overflow drain tube that is missing from my bike! Learned about that little problem from a previous thread.

  6. #6
    Elwood 169347's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Canadian Prairie
    Posts
    170
    Why does the gas tank need to be removed in order to put on a new clutch cable? I thought you just had to route it through the steering head and down the right side of the frame, connect the aluminum ferrule to the boss on the transmission and connect the ends.

    Woodgrain

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by woodgrain View Post
    Why does the gas tank need to be removed in order to put on a new clutch cable? I thought you just had to route it through the steering head and down the right side of the frame, connect the aluminum ferrule to the boss on the transmission and connect the ends.

    Woodgrain
    The gas tank may not need to be removed. That depends primarily on if; how many; and how tight the inappropriate wire ties installed previously might be.

    More importantly - cables break right up by the barrel in the lever because every time you pull the clutch the cable flexes right at that point. Each flex weakens the cable. Strands start breaking, then the cable frays, and eventually the cable breaks. Flexing at this location is not supposed to happen. It is supposed to be prevented by the barrel rotating in the hole in the lever so that the cable pulls straight as the lever moves through its arc.

    The barrel not rotating, the subsequent cable flexing, and the resultant cable breaking are caused by one or both of two causes: lack of lubrication at the barrel and/or roughness in the hole in the lever.

    So when you install the new cable you should check that the inside of the hole in the lever is smooth and clean. And, you should grease the barrel with a good grease. And then periodically - how frequently depends on several factors including the climate, dust conditions, etc - you should clean and re-grease the barrel and the lever.

    Hope this helps.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  8. #8
    TGHSMITH
    Guest
    the gas tank should be removed so that proper routing and tie wrapping can be done, the metal under the plastic cover of a cable will wear into the the tank if not secured so there is no interferance. the tank is easy to take off and its a good time to take a look at everything under that area(wire connections, cracked coils,black widow spiders ect ect ).

  9. #9
    the Wizard of Oz 26667's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW suburban chgo
    Posts
    1,929

    string

    does everyone tie a length of string to one end of the old cable and use that to pull the new cable through the same route? You still to do the cable ties, but you don't have to wonder if it's right going under the tach and speedo past the shb.
    We might as well walk. ~ Adam Guettel The Light In The Piazza
    used to own: 1982 R100T, 1984 R65, 1986K75C, 1997 R1100RT, R850R, K75S, 1978 R100RS... what was I thinking?

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,663
    haven't bothered with the string thing before- clutch cable is pretty solid piece of hardware, and i've found it tends to route itself pretty cleanly.
    something you might want to consider doing before you button everything back up is to run a new spare along the length of the new replacement. seal each end of the spare before installing on bike. zip tie in place. now when the new one becomes the old broken one, your replacement is in place, ready to go. makes for a real easy road side fix.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  11. #11
    Always a good idea to keep spare clutch and throttle cables in seat cowl.

  12. #12
    sumran
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    The gas tank may not need to be removed. That depends primarily on if; how many; and how tight the inappropriate wire ties installed previously might be.

    More importantly - cables break right up by the barrel in the lever because every time you pull the clutch the cable flexes right at that point. Each flex weakens the cable. Strands start breaking, then the cable frays, and eventually the cable breaks. Flexing at this location is not supposed to happen. It is supposed to be prevented by the barrel rotating in the hole in the lever so that the cable pulls straight as the lever moves through its arc.

    The barrel not rotating, the subsequent cable flexing, and the resultant cable breaking are caused by one or both of two causes: lack of lubrication at the barrel and/or roughness in the hole in the lever.

    So when you install the new cable you should check that the inside of the hole in the lever is smooth and clean. And, you should grease the barrel with a good grease. And then periodically - how frequently depends on several factors including the climate, dust conditions, etc - you should clean and re-grease the barrel and the lever.

    Hope this helps.
    Very helpful. Thanks. The barrel problem you discussed was exactly the cause of the cable failure. I now have everthing torn apart on both the clutch and the brake side. I assumed (correctly) the the brake side was as bad as the clutch side. I addition to cleaning and lubing, I am going to buff the barrels smooth before I reinstall. Hopefully, I have saved the need for replacing that cable. This will be added to my growing list of routine maintenance items.

    I have also disassembled and cleaned the throttle control mechanism, as suggested in a recent "Keep 'em Flying" article. At first glance it appeared to be well lubricated. Once I took it apart and started cleaning it became obvious the grease was very old and needed to be changed. I think someone had opened the cover and added new grease on top of the old stuff. There was some nasty buildup under there.

    Since I was already planning to install some barbacks and fabricate a mount for the new GPS, I am going to do that now. The cables need to be removed and rerouted to accomplish that job, so I am already well on the way. If I had purchased the GPS sooner, I might have discovered my encrusted barrels and saved a clutch cable! The GPS mount has become a bit more complicated that first planned because a location below the instrument cluster is visually blocked by my tank bag. I need to get it above and to the right of the tach, tucked in behind the windshield. Still working out the details. Once it is fabricated and tested I'll need to take it off again and take it to the powder coater. Then I can post some pic's.

  13. #13
    Grammarian no, Rider yes ISAMEMON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Kings Valley Oregon
    Posts
    1,718
    what article are you talkig about for the throttle cables, mind posting a link ?

  14. #14
    I think there was an article in ON a couple of years ago. I made a "measuring tool" out of a piece of wire to check the distance between the back of the trans and the front of the clutch adjusting arm. It describes this "tool" and how to adjust clutch. I just don't remember what month or even year. I guess maybe 3 years ago?
    beemerfield

  15. #15
    sumran
    Guest

    ON article

    I would gladly post a link, but it was in the mag, not electronic. It was in the Keep 'em Flying column that is in each issue. It was within the last few months. There was not a lot of detail about how to do the job, just a picture and a mention that cleaning and regreasing the assembly should be a regular maintenance item.

    It comes apart easily. There is a bolt on the top on the control assembly that holds on the cover. Once that is removed the cables can be disconnected and the other pieces can be removed for cleaning. The throttle tube slides off the handlebar, so that you can clean and grease under it. There are alignment marks on the throttle tube and the chain gear to make sure it is reinstalled correctly.

    The cleaning and lubrication of the barrels that hold the cables in the hand controls is something very important that I had missed. I am told by the local mechanic that the cables will last many years if this is done regularly. He said most cable failures are a result of this maintenance point being neglected.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •