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Thread: BRITS in BMW MOA

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by tonkandy View Post
    While on the subject of Brits. I came across this article this morning

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/s...st/7098116.stm

    Simply...How?

    What part of a bicycle enables you to perform any such act?

    I've blown up tyres before now, but I wouldn't call that intimate. (I used a pump...honest guv')

    On the subject of sheep though.

    Shepard's Pie. There's a big clue in the name and it's not the pie part.

    So, how come, last night at an Irish pub in Seattle, shepard's pie was made with beef?
    I've even been to a place called the Three Lions in Redmond, the professed British enclave in the Pacific North West...minced beef again.
    It's not like minced lamb isn't available...I've got some in the freezer.
    It's also not like the name for a beef version of a shepard's pie doesn't exist. It does. It's called a cottage pie. Sheep/Shepards, Cattle/.......no wait the arguement breaks down there, because cattle don't live in cottages do they.
    Still, it's tradition and all that sort of stuff.

    While you are busy sorting that out, I've a tandem to sort out...ahhh identical twins!

  2. #62
    tonkandy
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamble View Post
    Simply...How?

    While you are busy sorting that out, I've a tandem to sort out...ahhh identical twins!
    It don't mean a thing if it aint got that Schwinn.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by tonkandy View Post
    It don't mean a thing if it aint got that Schwinn.

    If the picture of the bike is actually the pretty little minx he is reported to have had relations with, I noticed it had no bell. Surely that's illegal?

  4. #64
    Living the Legend Bigrider's Avatar
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    BAORing

    I've spent very little time in the UK, but I have spent a lot of time in the field with the BAOR (British Army of The Rhine (in Germany of course) in the late 80's. Does that count? The boys played hard, drank hard and cheated at every opportunity they could in war games. We loved them for all those endearing qualities. Alas, the BAOR and 2nd Armored Div are no more.

    Dave H
    San Antonio, Tx

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Bigrider View Post
    I've spent very little time in the UK, but I have spent a lot of time in the field with the BAOR (British Army of The Rhine (in Germany of course) in the late 80's. Does that count? The boys played hard, drank hard and cheated at every opportunity they could in war games. We loved them for all those endearing qualities. Alas, the BAOR and 2nd Armored Div are no more.

    Dave H
    San Antonio, Tx
    You see, this is where English as a common language isn't always interpreted the same way. You say "Tomaydo", we say "tomarto", you say "cheat", we say, "used one's innitiative to gain an advantage"

  6. #66
    univers zero tessler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamble View Post
    You see, this is where English as a common language isn't always interpreted the same way. You say "Tomaydo", we say "tomarto", you say "cheat", we say, "used one's innitiative to gain an advantage"

    By the way Lamble, 2 more British giants-of-cinema (can't believe I neglected these two in the first place!):

    Stan Laurel
    Charles Chaplin

    'nuff sed!

  7. #67

    ashes to ashes

    Quote Originally Posted by tessler View Post

    By the way Lamble, 2 more British giants-of-cinema (can't believe I neglected these two in the first place!):

    Stan Laurel
    Charles Chaplin

    'nuff sed!
    Do you recall, Charlie Chaplain's ashes were stolen from acrypt in Switzerland some years back?
    I was at a fancy dress party-I think I went as a carrot-when this guy arrived dressed perfectly normally. The host expressed concern about the unsuitable attire, at which the guest flicked his cigarette on the carpet and said, "I've come as Chaplain's missing ashes", then turned around and left.

  8. #68
    O-Man
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    Shouldn't this thread go to the "Don't go there" forum?

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzin View Post
    Shouldn't this thread go to the "Don't go there" forum?
    I'd agree if this were the 'Romford on a wet Sunday morning' thread! Dreadful place from an architectural point of view. I'm sure there are worse places, but I also associate Romford with back surgery, so it starts with a disadvantage.

    Why is it wet Sunday mornings are usually so dull? Is it the contrast with all the Saturday evening entertainment, so a wet Sunday is some sort of universal atonement for excess (obviously not those parts of the universe where Saturday isn't pis* up night).
    Romford Saturday's are notorious, unless you are in a hospital with a 'Naught by mouth' sign on the bottom of your bed and with straight-jacket tucked in sheets.

    Just the thought of Romfod makes me want to run around wantonly, windmilling my arms...because I can.

    Don't go there! Except on Saturday nights.

  10. #70
    Bear n Cass 2beers's Avatar
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    Mushy Peas and Newcastles

    Hello Lamble, We are looking for a mushy peas recipe. Is this one of those "everyone's mother has one and they are all different"? Please PM me if you have one. Also does the kind of peas used make a difference?

    I made it to England twice when I was in the Air Force. 37 days at RAF Fairford and it rained all 37 days!!! Also a spent time at RAF Mildenhall. At Fairford I was lucky to have friends stationed there and they had a car. On the weekends we went out and toured the countryside. I was suprised to see pubs letting dogs in and the one we were at had a water dish for each of the dogs of the regular customers. Also made it for a day at RAF Lakenheath. I enjoyed many pub lunches and developed an affection for Newcastles. I spent a Christmas at Fairford and enjoyed being with my friends. I always found the Brits I met very friendly.

    I would stand on the aircraft parking spots and could almost hear the engines of the B-17's, B24's and Lancasters. It is hard to believe they would put hundereds of these aircraft in the air day after day.

    The history of the place is what I loved the most. To see buildings with cornerstones from the 1400's when all we have around here is the late 1800's.

    My grandmother was British so there is a special place in my heart for the place. Hope to go back for Cass and my 25th anniversary.

    The first day I got to Fairford I was getting onto a bus driven by a British gent and he greeted us by saying "My name is Barney and I am the first bloke you have met. You will always remember me" Dang he was right!!!

    Cheers!!
    2001 K1200LT "Zoot" RIP 10/14/2007
    2009 K1200LT "Angus"

    Cartoon Bears never wear pants!!

  11. #71
    Bear n Cass 2beers's Avatar
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    One more thing....

    I remember the smell of the coal fires in the grates. I had to ask someone what the funny smell was ( I live in Wisconsin so I am used to a lot of funny smells). They thought it was funny I didn't know what it was.

    I was young and innocent at the time......


    2001 K1200LT "Zoot" RIP 10/14/2007
    2009 K1200LT "Angus"

    Cartoon Bears never wear pants!!

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by 2beers View Post
    Hello Lamble, We are looking for a mushy peas recipe. Is this one of those "everyone's mother has one and they are all different"? Please PM me if you have one. Also does the kind of peas used make a difference?

    I made it to England twice when I was in the Air Force. 37 days at RAF Fairford and it rained all 37 days!!! Also a spent time at RAF Mildenhall. At Fairford I was lucky to have friends stationed there and they had a car. On the weekends we went out and toured the countryside. I was suprised to see pubs letting dogs in and the one we were at had a water dish for each of the dogs of the regular customers. Also made it for a day at RAF Lakenheath. I enjoyed many pub lunches and developed an affection for Newcastles. I spent a Christmas at Fairford and enjoyed being with my friends. I always found the Brits I met very friendly.

    I would stand on the aircraft parking spots and could almost hear the engines of the B-17's, B24's and Lancasters. It is hard to believe they would put hundereds of these aircraft in the air day after day.

    The history of the place is what I loved the most. To see buildings with cornerstones from the 1400's when all we have around here is the late 1800's.

    My grandmother was British so there is a special place in my heart for the place. Hope to go back for Cass and my 25th anniversary.

    The first day I got to Fairford I was getting onto a bus driven by a British gent and he greeted us by saying "My name is Barney and I am the first bloke you have met. You will always remember me" Dang he was right!!!

    Cheers!!
    I visited Upper Heyford, Mildenhall and Lakenheath at one time or another.

    Funny you should mention mushy peas, we were looking for them yesterday at World Market and they'd sold out...obviously word is spreading.
    I'm guessing marrowfat peas as they have a suitably squishy consistency. I doubt many folk in the UK can make them and would revert to either getting them at the local chippie, or buying tins.

    We were once in a pub quiz in N. England, a place called Brough. There was a picture section, where you had to name people from obscure images, or childhood images. We got most of them (and won the quiz) but were stumped by a picture of a puppy...it turned out to be one of the local's sheep dog. Turns out, the adult dog was sitting right next to us, probably s******ing a doggy-s****** at our stupidity.

  13. #73
    Found this:

    INGREDIENTS
    1 (10 ounce) package frozen green peas
    1/4 cup heavy cream
    1 tablespoon butter
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper





    DIRECTIONS
    Bring a shallow pot of lightly salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add frozen peas, and cook for 3 minutes, or until tender.
    Drain peas, and transfer to a blender or large food processor. Add cream, butter, salt and pepper to peas, and process until blended, but still thick with small pieces of peas. Adjust seasonings to taste, and serve immediately.


    Reviewed on Sep. 19, 2006 by MOLLE888
    My boyfriend and I just returned from the UK and we fell in love with mushy peas while we were over there. I was delighted to find a recipe for them on allrecipes, however I was really skeptical as to how they would taste. These were AWESOME, and tasted just like the mushy peas we enjoyed in England! Thank you so much for this easy, delicious recipe. I served these with traditional fish and chips... fried cod and fried potato strips.



    Reviewed on Nov. 21, 2006 by Kate
    Best peas ever. I did not want mine so pureed, so I just used a hand held potato masher to mush them up with the butter, cream, salt, and pepper and they turned out GREAT!!



    Reviewed on Aug. 26, 2007 by vanessajbaca
    These came out great. I boiled three cloves of garlic with the peas, then mushed them up together, then added fat-free creamer, a spoonful of sour cream, and eyeballed the butter and salt and pepper, and they came out fantastic! The texture was knobbly-smooth and the flavor went perfectly with a pecan-crusted, honey-mustard glazed salmon recipe also found on this site. A great meal.

    2Beers, for me I'd add malt vinegar and pepper too, especially if they are to accompany fish and chips.

  14. #74
    Are there any soccer fans here?
    Which team/s do you follow and why?

    The offside rule

  15. #75
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    While we're talking about various things British, I have always heard the terms 'git,' 'prat,' 'berk,' etc. used in usually comedic settings to describe someone as either unintelligent or idiotic or something along those general lines. Are these terms similar to each other or not? Are their meanings specific? Any particular cautions about meanings I should observe when using them?
    2012 R1200GS
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