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Thread: Cylinder head protectors.

  1. #1
    Little Egypt Airheads
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    Quote Originally Posted by 115779 View Post
    Do you use cylinder head protectors on your Airhead and do you believe them to be necessary?


    I recently ran across an interesting treatise on this subject (can't recall just where, though).
    The basic argument was that, in a low side crash, the plain rocker box covers on the cylinders have about 4 - 6 square inches of surface area that contacts the ground / pavement. The covers also have a gentle roundness to them, too. The usual "crash bar" will only have 1 square inch or so of surface area in contact with the ground during a low side crash and has a much sharper curvature to it, as well. The authors conclusion was that crash bars would be more likely to turn a low side crash into a high side one because of these factors. Of course, there are a lot of "depends" to what would actually happen, though.

    "I have achieved my 70 years in the usual way: by sticking strictly to a scheme of life that would kill anyone else." Mark Twain

  2. #2
    On Duane's site, the comment about the crash bars go along with the "multiple rollover" idea that they present more of a problem. I have them on my bike but have been considering removing them... not sure yet.

  3. #3
    Registered User Bob_M's Avatar
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    Hmmm

    I bought a used pair and put them on the R100 prior to my son taking over ownership. He dropped the bike at a gas station at 0 MPH and again at a camp ground, again at 0 MPH both times with not so much as a scratch on either the paint or the valve covers. During the bar install session I removed the (BMW, but non-stock) oil cooler and simplified the routine maintenance by a factor of 10

    The bike is less handsome with the crash bars on, and they will not be permanent fixtures.

  4. #4
    Airhead krehmkej's Avatar
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    No to bars

    I had bars on my R80 in Germany. In a medium-speed crash, I high-sided AND the bar collapsed into the rocker cover, cracking the cover.

    -jwk-
    Dallas, OR
    R80/7

  5. #5
    dinandan
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    Crash Bars Saved my Leg

    I‘«÷m very thankful my first bike came with crash bars. Two years ago I was side swiped by a Lincoln Navigator. The crash bars bent toward the engine and just barely made contact with the motor surface. If the crash bars had not been installed the bumper of the SUV would have cracked the case of the engine making the repairs much more extensive. The crash bars saved me from a broken left leg ‘«™the bars took the impact. My Fianc?ģe who was on the back broke both bones in her left leg. I think I‘«÷ll install crash bars around the engine AND saddle bags on all my bikes.

    Dan
    1983 R80RT
    1983 CB450
    1978 CB125S

  6. #6
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krehmkej View Post
    I had bars on my R80 in Germany. In a medium-speed crash, I high-sided AND the bar collapsed into the rocker cover, cracking the cover.
    ...and you're thinking that the rocker cover would NOT have sustained any damage if the bars had not been there? A high-side is a pretty violent incident...I think all bets are off regaring whether bars are going to help or not... IMO...
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  7. #7
    Rally Rat gstom's Avatar
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    Sure, just do it

    Why not? Cheap insurance. Don't stress...just do it!

  8. #8
    Well, it definitely makes it easier to put the lower fairing bits on without them! Thanks for all the input.

  9. #9
    Airhead krehmkej's Avatar
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    My point regarding the high-side wipeout is that the guard didn't prevent any damage, and itself was just another damaged part to replace.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by krehmkej View Post
    My point regarding the high-side wipeout is that the guard didn't prevent any damage, and itself was just another damaged part to replace.

    which is why mine are gone.

    if you crash hard enough to damage a jug, you've got much more to be worrying about.

  11. #11
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ducatipaso View Post
    which is why mine are gone.

    if you crash hard enough to damage a jug, you've got much more to be worrying about.
    For the same reasons, that's why I have them. Hopefully, in a "perfect" world, what happens most is the parking lot tipovers or oops situations. The bars take the brunt of those encounters. And, to add what you said, if you're crashing hard enough and often enough, maybe the bars are not an issue...worry about something else...
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    For the same reasons, that's why I have them. Hopefully, in a "perfect" world, what happens most is the parking lot tipovers or oops situations. The bars take the brunt of those encounters. And, to add what you said, if you're crashing hard enough and often enough, maybe the bars are not an issue...worry about something else...

    I knock wood this isnt happening to me, but then again, my butchered bike is super light so parking lot maneuverability and whatnot is quite uneventful. The lighter it is, the easier it'll tip over, too

  13. #13
    tjc9680
    Guest
    I don't think that engine guards cause highside crashes. What does is releasing the rear brake while you sliding. This cause the rear wheel to try to realign with the front thus causing the violent jerk. I was a motor officer and we use to practice laying the bikes down and the trick was to keep the rear wheel locked until you were stopped. This was done prior to all the new up dates in the braking systems.

  14. #14
    HERRHEAD
    Guest

    Crash bars? But they‘«÷re already engineered in!

    I was involved in my first crash a few weeks ago during a track day in the rain. A 40+ mph low side after my front wheel slipped out in the wet. After I was reunited again with my bike, I was inspecting the damage and noticed that I had ground down about a ?Ę‘«ō off my cylinder head cover. To my astonishment, that was the only damage the bike received. Not a mark on my turn signals, handlebar ends, nothing! Granted, I think I was pretty luck, but that gave me a new appreciation for how stout and well engineered these bikes are. Quite a few bikes went down that day and I am thankful that I am just replacing a $60 cover and not pedals, turn signals, handlebars and expensive bits of plastic.

    As to whether I would be forking out ANY money if I hadn‘«÷t taken off the crash bars that the bike came with, or whether the crash might have turned into a highside if I had them on - as some may argue‘«™who knows. But I know I wouldn‘«÷t be getting the lean angles I have if I was using them, oil filters changes are a bit quicker and easier without them and, quite honestly, I think the bike looks a thousand times nicer without them. And I probably would have ended up forking out AT LEAST $60 to get a replacement crash bar if I had had them during that crash.

    If you are worried about getting a scratch or two on your cylinder covers when you drop the bike in a parking lot go ahead and get them‘«™I can‘«÷t help but think about those plastic covers people put on their couches and chairs to protect them from spilled drinks and dust when I do see guards on airheads.

    And as far as guards protecting you or the bike in an accident/collision on the street? I think that there are so many variables that no one can say for sure - anyway, just my two cents.

  15. #15
    hey herrhead I'd love to see some pix of your bike, and know more about what you've done to it.

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