View Poll Results: So, was the Cycle World article fair to the F800ST?

Voters
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  • Yes, it was

    7 53.85%
  • No, it favored the Honda

    3 23.08%
  • No opinon as I haven't read the article

    3 23.08%
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Thread: Cycle World Article

  1. #61
    Rally Rat
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    Apr 2007
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    Tampa, FL
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    607
    My wife rides an 06 VFR ABS and I just traded my 06 VFR for an 07 1200GS. The ONLY reason I got rid of the VFR was that despite heli-bars and other mods, I couldn't get enough forward pressure off my wrists for long rides. I've ridden the ST, as well as just about every other current BMW (we know the BMW demo fleet guys and gals pretty well..), and we work part-time as volunteers for Honda, so have ridden everything they have as well. FWIW, my opinion is that the VFR is hands-down one of the best, most capable sport-touring bikes I've ever ridden (35 years of riding experience). It isn't spectacular in any one aspect of either the sport or touring categories, but it does all of them very well. My wife and I just completed a FL-CA-FL cross country trip of 7000 miles, and she did numerous back-to-back days of 600-700 miles (sometimes more), without a hitch. The bike is almost Gold Wing smooth, fast, good in the corners and bullet-proof. It gets between 45-50 mpg, loaded at touring speeds. The hard bags (OEM, made by Givi for Honda) look great, come factory-color painted to the bike, and are HUGE inside for their size. The bags can pack more than my OEM GS bags when they're expanded. They go on and off easy and are sturdy. In fact, while we were on the trip, we accidentally leaned the bikes against one another, and her plastic bag DENTED the aluminum side of my GS bag, with no damage to her plastic or paint. (I really like my GS, but I have several issues with the quality and design of the OEM bags...)

    If there is a downside to the VFR, its the VTEC engine configuration, but not in terms of horsepower or torque, or even the horsepower surge with the extra valve cut-in at 6800 rpm (you use it to your advantage, ala dusting the ST). The problem is tune-ups and valve adjustments. The 16,000 miles valve adjustment, if done at the dealer (and its pretty complex for a do-it-yourselfer, you don't just adjust, but replace if out of spec), will run you somewhere between $800-$1100. Ask me how we know...

    Anyway, there's no doubt the ST is a good bike. BMW doesn't make anything but excellent machines. Its one of the reasons I chose to go to the GS. It is just like others have said, the VFR has 25 years of refinement behind it, and it shows. Everyone on the Honda side was betting they were going to replace it this year, but its been brought back unchanged for 08 save a new color, silver. If you want a really good sport-touring machine for the price range, you can't beat it.

  2. #62
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    Nov 2005
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    Calgary, Alberta
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    5,365

    cycle world

    If I can go back to the urine cups for a moment, I saw a retro new Ducati on the weekend with aftermarket aluminum clutch and brake fluid reservoirs mounted, so I assume someone will be making them for the F 800 soon.

    They look sharp.

    Rinty

  3. #63
    Unavailable for comment
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    Apr 2007
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    Wolverines released
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    I saw the article

    And if I hadn't any exposure to Beamers, I would be persuaded to not look at one. I can't say to the opponent, but the BMW wasn't fairly reviewed in my opinion. The take away is if I didn't know any better, BMW wouldn't have a sale.

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

  4. #64
    TourUp
    Guest

    F800ST Touring Capabilities

    I took a trip this summer to Chicago from southern California on a F800ST- as far as luggage room is concerned: a pair of bungee cords are a blessed thing, and I was able to fit a tent, sleeping bag, food, books, plenty of water, and about a weeks worth of clothing. Riding through varying weather and conditions, the bike gave me no issues or real hiccups and was comfortable to a point (would look into possibly getting an after-market gel pad cushion).
    When I got back home after 6k miles, I threw on a new pair of tires and checked in for the scheduled maintenance. Aside from touring, I use this bike as my commuter and have found it a joy to ride. The power band is nice, smooth, and predictable, but in reality, if you are a sport-bike rider, does leave something to be desired in the high end.
    In the end, this bike serves its purpose well. It's a brilliant all-rounder that is able to compete with the likes of the Interceptor, a compliment into itself.
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  5. #65
    Registered User coyotebmw's Avatar
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    Feb 2004
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    Newcastle, WA
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    111

    Amen!

    Since I originally started this thread, I have put over 2400 miles on my F800ST and really do agree with "Tourup". The bike is a very good all round bike. The bags work well and the bike performs excellently in all conditions. In addition, I also use my bike for everyday commuting as well as long rides.

    Shortly after buying the bike, I went to Mayhill Loops Road, down on the Columbia River south of Goldendale, WA. This is a designated historic road, as it was the first paved road in Washington State. It was build by Sam Hill as a demonstration of paving roads in Washington in the early 1900's, he also built the Maryhill estate that gives the road its name, and the Great Northern Railroad in Washington State. As a designated historic road, it is maintained in pristine condition, and is a dream to ride, fast! It is about 2 miles long and has 23 curves, three of which are hairpins! I was there as part of a campout of Motorcycle Safety Instructors who contract with Evergreen Safety Council here in Washington State.

    Both the experience of riding my new bike there (about 600 miles round trip), and the experience of riding up and down the "loops road' for a day, gave me a real appreciation of the capabilities of the F800ST. It was a dream! As to the original post on this thread, what ever you get out of the Cycle World article is pretty much up to you. Each of us has different reasons, and preferences, when we ride. Like the old 1960's Honda ad said "different strokes for different folks".

    We all share a common appreciation and enjoyment in riding BMWs, but as a Motorcycle Instructor, I have found that saying is so true. What works for one person may not for the next. There are many, many different kinds, makes and models of motorcycles out there, and what is really important is that we ride, we enjoy our riding, and we share it with others.
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    CoyoteBMW
    53 years of BMW's - 1960 R26 and 2007 F800ST!

  6. #66
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    f 800

    An F 800 would have to be a fun ride on that road!

    Rinty

  7. #67
    Registered User coyotebmw's Avatar
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    Feb 2004
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    Newcastle, WA
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    Yes! I was!

    No Chicken Stripes after that ride (at least not much)!
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    CoyoteBMW
    53 years of BMW's - 1960 R26 and 2007 F800ST!

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