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Thread: New Tire Scrub-in...Urban Legend or...?

  1. #1
    Rally Rat gstom's Avatar
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    Question New Tire Scrub-in...Urban Legend or...?

    I know that, collectively, the forum participants have broken in virtually thousands of new tires. Some contend that a special "scrub-in" period is required to get rid of the "form release compounds" that may be on a new tire. I have read in various on-line forums and lists that one could "scrub-in" a new tire by scuffing it with sand paper, washing it with detergent, and/or other suggested procedures.

    My experience with new tires has simply been to mount the new tire and ride on it as I normally would. I have never had a problem doing this.

    The question I am posing is.. Is tire "scrub-in" an urban legend, or is this something that a careful rider should pay attention to when riding on a new set of tires?

    Discuss among yourselves...........................

  2. #2
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    new tire scrub in

    Tom:

    I'm like you, I just ride them in. If I'm riding on a new front tire, with fast guys, I just drop to the back of the pack and I don't load the tire up as much in the corners, then try to make up the distance on the straights. If I'm in rain on a new tire, I'm really careful. But I can't be bothered to do figure 8's in a parking lot, or the other stuff to scuff them in. I broke in a new front Laser once, in rain, on a really tight road, on my '82 RS, and was surprised at the lean angles I could get with no slippage. I think a lot of it has to do with how gradually you transition into and out of, the corners.

    Rinty

  3. #3
    Registered User marcopolo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSTom
    I know that, collectively, the forum participants have broken in virtually thousands of new tires. Some contend that a special "scrub-in" period is required to get rid of the "form release compounds" that may be on a new tire. I have read in various on-line forums and lists that one could "scrub-in" a new tire by scuffing it with sand paper, washing it with detergent, and/or other suggested procedures.

    My experience with new tires has simply been to mount the new tire and ride on it as I normally would. I have never had a problem doing this.

    The question I am posing is.. Is tire "scrub-in" an urban legend, or is this something that a careful rider should pay attention to when riding on a new set of tires?

    Discuss among yourselves...........................
    Try reading the tire manufacturer's website. Any tire I've ever used has always had a run-in period specified by the manufacturer.
    Mark
    2015 R 1200 GS Adventure

  4. #4
    X-Troller hexst's Avatar
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    just a coupla heat cycles will do the trick. or about 80 miles for normal wear.If it's cold outside it might take a little longer especialy with French Super Sport tyres.
    Knick
    R1200GS
    Vespa ET4

  5. #5
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    I like 100 miles to get them scrubbed in. Even if it is an urban myth new tires will handle differently then the tires you just took off.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  6. #6
    The comment about manufacturer run-in periods is valid, this is a cut & paste from Metzeler's site and can be found in the mounting and safety section.

    This is the optimum recommendation, and as such it would be natural that there are varying levels of safety up to the optimum and I believe that is why we can "get away with" scrubbing in figure eights, scrubbing with Simple Green and scuff pads, just mount and ride etc.

    At some point we may suffer a slip or such from pushing the envelope of recommendations, but that is the choice we make right? In the paint business it is widely known that a respirator should be worn and yet there are countless thousands painting (some on TV shows too) without a respirator...they may get away with it but sooner or later the odds catch us up.

    FROM METZELER SITE: http://www.metzelermoto.com/product_...y/index.htm#19

    RUN-IN

    After fitting, the tyre should not be used with maximum power or hard cornering and not over 60 mph for the first 100-150 miles. This is needed to allow the tyre/rim assembly to adjust properly and most of all to let the compound find his optimum working conditions .

  7. #7
    belquar
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    I lowsided the CLC in my avatar with a new rear tire. It was a combination of events but was less than 3 miles from the dealership. Relatively new rider. Second new rear tire in 6 months. I was having crappy luck with nails.

    I had to brake really hard due to a cager stopping suddenly in front of me. We were leaving a intersection. The light went green. We started to go. No signal...nothing. The cager decided at the last minute to turn left but couldn't and stood on their brakes. I got stopped. Walked the bike around the minivan. Scowled and then hit the gas. The intersection is a modified traffic circle. NJ has some screwy intersections. I shifted to second, rolled on the throttle and leaned into my curve while giving it some gas...(supposed to do that right?)...to much load on the brandy new rear tire and I was sliding down the asphalt at 40 mph.

    So...from now on...new tire and I do some turns in the lot and then slalom when I can for 20-40 miles. YMMV depending on how much slaloming you can do.

  8. #8
    Registered User
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    Motorcycle Consumer News did an article on this subject a few months back (not sure exactly when). They tried a number of different scuffing techniques- sandpaper, wire wheels on a drill, but the one I came away with was to attack the tire with a hand wire brush, scuffing the tread surface to break the "skin" of the tire. Even so I still ride carefully for the first 100-150 miles.

  9. #9
    ABC,AMA(LIFE),MOA,RA,IBMW MANICMECHANIC's Avatar
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    We still tell customers to take it easy for at least 50 miles. We have seen a couple who thought they knew better pull out of the shop lot onto the street and lose it. I believe it does have to do with the myriad random factors, such as mold release, UV protectant, new tire skin, operator/equipment mismatch, and plain-old operator error.
    F.O.G.Rider, Rounder #6,
    Ambassador, WI Airmarshal
    BMWRA Wisconsin Region Rep

  10. #10
    Registered User MOTOR31's Avatar
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    Simple test here. Take your old tire and run your hand down the tread. Notice how slippery it is. Go to a rack of new tires and do the same. Notice the difference? I take it easy on new tires for about 50 miles. By the time I have 100 miles they are scrubbed in just fine.
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  11. #11
    TOR1150R
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    On a new set, I use 1 tank of gas as the scrub-in period - taking it a little easier in curves and in the rain.

  12. #12
    There are two elements to this - three if you count the seal at the bead. First, some but not all manufacturers use mold release compound on some of their tires. It is designed to ease the seperation of the hot tire from the mold. And it doesn't provide particularly good traction until it is removed. Second, the rubber compound needs considerable flexing and heating and cooling to reach optimum grip.

    Third, it may take some flexing and time for the bead to completely seal tightly to the rim.

    Manual scrubbing the tire with a wire brush or very course sandpaper deals with issue 1. Riding at least 50 miles with at least one cool down deals with issue 2 and issue 3.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://web.bigbend.net/~glaves/

  13. #13
    Stuff2c
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUDGYPAINTGUY
    FROM METZELER SITE: http://www.metzelermoto.com/product_...y/index.htm#19

    RUN-IN

    After fitting, the tyre should not be used with maximum power or hard cornering and not over 60 mph for the first 100-150 miles. This is needed to allow the tyre/rim assembly to adjust properly and most of all to let the compound find his optimum working conditions .
    I should be dead

  14. #14
    Harrington
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    I don't trust rubber until it's rolled on pavement. I also don't trust cold tires as much as warm ones. With that being said, I'll take it easy until the tires are warm and I've rolled over the entire tire....which is to me 20 miles in the warm twisties. One could do it faster but I'll leave that for track conditions and other riders.

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