View Poll Results: In what other languages are you conversant?

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  • Spanish

    15 34.09%
  • French

    8 18.18%
  • Italian

    2 4.55%
  • German

    13 29.55%
  • Russian

    4 9.09%
  • Japanese

    0 0%
  • Chinese

    3 6.82%
  • Korean

    0 0%
  • Arabic

    1 2.27%
  • Other

    19 43.18%
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Thread: What other languages do you speak?

  1. #1
    RIDERR1150GSADV
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinty
    Ik spreek ook Hollans (but my spelling isn't always too good).

    Rinty
    That was pretty good!! Just add a d in Hollands and it be perfect!!
    There aren't many foreign people who speak it and the reason is that it is a very tough language to learn. Many of the American friends we had in Holland actually tried to learn it, but the Dutch speak English well and foreigners have a tough time getting the Dutch to speak Dutch with them. Pronunciation is the worst to learn and during WWII, German spies were always caught if asked to pronounce places like Scheveningen. Their accents fell through right away. After 25 years away though things have changed for me too. Reading the papers affirms this, as spelling has changed in a few words and new ones have been added leaving me stumped at times.

  2. #2
    BFish
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    i had to vote "other"...those languages are "trash" and "foul".

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by riderR1150GSAdv
    That was pretty good!! Just add a d in Hollands and it be perfect!!
    There aren't many foreign people who speak it and the reason is that it is a very tough language to learn. Many of the American friends we had in Holland actually tried to learn it, but the Dutch speak English well and foreigners have a tough time getting the Dutch to speak Dutch with them. Pronunciation is the worst to learn and during WWII, German spies were always caught if asked to pronounce places like Scheveningen. Their accents fell through right away. After 25 years away though things have changed for me too. Reading the papers affirms this, as spelling has changed in a few words and new ones have been added leaving me stumped at times.
    It's funny how tihngs work. In another thread (about misused English), Mandypants complained about the use of "hopefully". I looked that up, which led me to a word I didn't know, "shibboleth". Shibboleth is defined as any language usage indicative of one's social or regional origin, or more broadly, any practice that identifies members of a group. They have a lot of examples, one being the use of "Scheveningen" during the war. Now here you are mentioning it less than 24 hours later! Back on topic, when I was trying to learn, pronunciation was beaten in to me. The one I had problems with was the "ui" combination in words like "huis". I can still do THAT one correctly, now. I also had issues with using a more "German" pronunciation (mus be hereditary), so "Scheveningen" would have been a problem, initially. Of course, I know the important stuff; "Pils, Alstublieft". I'm thinking "pils" might have been a regional thing (Southwest Netherlands/Northeastern Belgium), maybe "bier" is more universal.

  4. #4
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdmetzger
    It's funny how tihngs work. In another thread (about misused English), Mandypants complained about the use of "hopefully". I looked that up, which led me to a word I didn't know, "shibboleth". Shibboleth is defined as any language usage indicative of one's social or regional origin, or more broadly, any practice that identifies members of a group. They have a lot of examples, one being the use of "Scheveningen" during the war. Now here you are mentioning it less than 24 hours later! Back on topic, when I was trying to learn, pronunciation was beaten in to me. The one I had problems with was the "ui" combination in words like "huis". I can still do THAT one correctly, now. I also had issues with using a more "German" pronunciation (mus be hereditary), so "Scheveningen" would have been a problem, initially. Of course, I know the important stuff; "Pils, Alstublieft". I'm thinking "pils" might have been a regional thing (Southwest Netherlands/Northeastern Belgium), maybe "bier" is more universal.
    You never know what you're going to learn on this channel.

    "Writers who use hopefully as a sentence adverb, as in Hopefully the measures will be adopted, should be aware that the usage is unacceptable to many critics, including a large majority of the Usage Panel. It is not easy to explain why critics dislike this use of hopefully. The use is justified by analogy to similar uses of many other adverbs, as in Mercifully, the play was brief or Frankly, I have no use for your friend. And though this use of hopefully may have been a vogue word when it first gained currency back in the early 1960s, it has long since lost any hint of jargon or pretentiousness for the general reader. The wide acceptance of the usage reflects popular recognition of its usefulness; there is no precise substitute. Someone who says Hopefully, the treaty will be ratified makes a hopeful prediction about the fate of the treaty, whereas someone who says I hope (or We hope or It is hoped) the treaty will be ratified expresses a bald statement about what is desired. Only the latter could be continued with a clause such as but it isn't likely. It might have been expected, then, that the initial flurry of objections to hopefully would have subsided once the usage became well established. Instead, critics appear to have become more adamant in their opposition. In the 1969 Usage Panel survey, 44 percent of the Panel approved the usage, but this dropped to 27 percent in our 1986 survey. (By contrast, 60 percent in the latter survey accepted the comparable use of mercifully in the sentence Mercifully, the game ended before the opponents could add another touchdown to the lopsided score.) It is not the use of sentence adverbs per se that bothers the Panel; rather, the specific use of hopefully in this way has become a shibboleth."

    Interesting how they stuck that word in there at the last.
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  5. #5
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    other languages

    The toughest thing about Dutch is the reverse sentence structures:

    Wie heeft de suiker in de ete soep gedaan? : who has the sugar in the pea soup put?

    It's a fantastic language for telling jokes and funny stories. It's hard to describe.

    Rinty

  6. #6
    Rally Rat RTRandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH
    Spanish and Kannarese.

    Does anyone even know where Kannares is spoken?
    Yo Paul, You mean Canarsie ? Now that's a heck of a language !

  7. #7
    Rally Rat RTRandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Statdawg
    Brooklyn ?
    Exactly! It takes a lifetime to talk like that.

  8. #8
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    We had to learn the Russian language in junior high and high school because of the "cold war". Then my wife took 4 more semesters in college. When we got our first flat in the city (St. Louis) the lady that owned it spoke Russian so she would sit with Sandy and talk and I could understand and usually answer in English/American. She loved Sandy so we got new curtains, new contact paper, new washer/dryer etc. When we started making more money and began looking for a house of our own she was heartbroken. Sandy went by for a while but when the babies started coming she didnt have the time. Now in my travels I occasionally get a Russian cabbie and listen to them talk on the phone and just before I get out say something about their conversation which either makes them laugh or they drop their chin! Ha! Exit Stage

  9. #9
    RIDERR1150GSADV
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinty
    The toughest thing about Dutch is the reverse sentence structures:

    Wie heeft de suiker in de hete soep gedaan? : who has the sugar in the pea soup put?

    It's a fantastic language for telling jokes and funny stories. It's hard to describe.

    Rinty
    That is so funny and true. Now try counting. In Holland we say (89) as 'nine-and-eighty' , the last digit being pronounced first, while in English its 'eighty nine' . 98= eight-and-ninety English is ninety eight. This does make more sense but as to why that is I don't know.
    Our 14 is however different as we say 'veertien' and not 'viertien' note the two ee's which changes the sound totally. Vier being # 4 normally. Now 15 is vijftien as in vijf (5) tien (10). I could give even more confusing examples but one can see that Dutch is difficult to learn. Now German on the other hand may sound similar at first glance but it is not at all. It is the same difference between Spanish and Italian, close but no cigar.

    And now for French, they have yet another way of saying 99 than anyone, they say quattre-vent-dix-neuf that is 4 x 20 + 19...... How would that sound in English if we said ninety nine like that??

    Languages are a lot of fun and the more you learn one language, the easier it is to learn others... IMHO

  10. #10
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Oh wait. I took four years of Latin. Oh wait again...I think I only remember one sentence. Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres. But, I had to cheat on the spelling at that...
    BMWMotorcycles, fun when they're running...
    My other bike is a BMW.
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  11. #11
    Registered User PHMARVIN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjack
    Oh wait. I took four years of Latin. Oh wait again...I think I only remember one sentence. Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres. But, I had to cheat on the spelling at that...
    Hi, Jack,
    Damned if I know
    Damned if I nare
    Damned if I navi
    Damned if I natus sum!
    Ride Safe,
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  12. #12
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHMarvin
    Hi, Jack,
    Damned if I know
    Damned if I nare
    Damned if I navi
    Damned if I natus sum!
    Whoa...if this keeps up I'm going to have to call on my first wife, the Latin and English teacher.
    BMWMotorcycles, fun when they're running...
    My other bike is a BMW.
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  13. #13
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    I am unable to converse in anything but English, but I know a few words here and there of several languages. I can ask some basic questions but cannot understand the answers. German is probably what I know the most of. I know an easy tourist-mistake in Russian. I took two semesters of Portuguese in college but only remember a handful of words, even though I had to take an oral exam in it.
    As for English, I am fascinated by forms other than American. Some of you may have noticed I often use British spellings (Colour, realise, etc.).
    2012 R1200GS

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  14. #14
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
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    Latin...

    According to a former colleague who was proficient in it, is summed up best with this bit of verse.

    Latin is a language covered with dust; it killed the Romans, and now it's killing us!
    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

    If you insist on exercising a right to burn our flag, first be so kind as to wrap yourself in it and then douse yourself with gasoline just before you strike the match.

  15. #15
    25-MPH NEXT 1OO MILES PacWestGS's Avatar
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    Since this has become a Latin language thread and I can't really think of any examples right now. I have studied various Latin words, since modern medicine is still based on the original teachings of medicine in Latin.

    So if you've ever wondered where "Stat" comes from? It is from the Latin word "statim" which means "immediately".

    But I prefer "Liquor" in the 12-uncia version And, let it be cito dispensetur adhibendus (administered quickly).

    Doc
    Russ
    "If you took the time to really get to know me...you'd be wasting your time, because I'm exactly who you think I am"

    (Life comes at you pretty fast "Pay it Forward" - Have no regrets when the end happens)

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