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Thread: R1200RT Rear Drive Failure

  1. #31
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kbrick
    I guess thats why they didn't!
    Although the single sided swingarm came about as the Monolever shortly before the Paralever, the Paralever pretty well forces a single sided swingarm set-up.

    And why? Because of jacking effect. Like who cares!!!! A GW and FJR 1300 has gobs more power and torque than my airheads and oilheads. I'll live with it...just give me a normal everyday rear drive that works and quit trying to impress me, BMW.

    I honestly wish Honda would make a shaft drive GS.
    Last edited by GlobalRider; 09-23-2006 at 01:40 PM.

  2. #32
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    GS rear drive anticipatory jitters

    So, I suppose that this is the worst possible time to be reading this thread since I -- yesterday -- signed up for a 2006 R1200GS...oh so shiny and new. On the other hand, my '95 R1100GS has been relatively trouble-free for 73,000 miles. I can only hope it will work out...and hope to remember to keep the service intervals and the guarantee intact.

  3. #33
    Registered User easy's Avatar
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    77691

    I would not worry about it. I have an '06 RT and I'm enjoying it more than any bike I've ever had. If I had it to do over again, I'd buy it in a heartbeat. The GS is a great bike and I think you'll feel the same. We just need to keep an eye out for any signs of trouble. That's the good thing about a three year warranty.

    Easy
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    "Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much."
    Oscar Wilde

  4. #34
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    rear drive jitters

    ...Like "Ride it like you own it." : )
    Thanks for consolatory comment! --j

  5. #35
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 77691
    So, I suppose that this is the worst possible time to be reading this thread since I -- yesterday -- signed up for a 2006 R1200GS.
    You should have read that "other" thread. BMW is going back to putting a drain plug in the rear wheel drive units for 2007. When I saw the R1200 GS at the show when it first came out, I wondered about BMW's reasoning for omitting one.

    BTW, this is Kawasaki's version of the Paralever. Although not employing a single sided swingarm, we'll see if the new Concours has the same problems. Come to think about it, why do I even need a single sided swingarm? For easy rear wheel removal? Like how often to I take the rear wheel off?

  6. #36
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider
    You should have read that "other" thread. BMW is going back to putting a drain plug in the rear wheel drive units for 2007. When I saw the R1200 GS at the show when it first came out, I wondered about BMW's reasoning for omitting one.

    ?
    Not quite. Nothing has changed mechanically. BMW has always had a drain plug in the drive at the midway horizontal level. The drive has to be rotated 90 degrees to allow the oil to drain out. This is now recommended on the '07 bikes at the 600 mile checkup. The fill was and is done thru the ABS sensor hole with a measured amount of gear oil, after the drive is rotated back into position. I think .23L for a refill. The "drain" plug is to be replaced with a new one that has a magnet in it.
    The recommended fill is BMW 75W90 synth which is made for them by Spectro.
    R1200GS LC Rallye
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  7. #37
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjack
    Not quite. Nothing has changed mechanically. BMW has always had a drain plug in the drive at the midway horizontal level. The drive has to be rotated 90 degrees to allow the oil to drain out. This is now recommended on the '07 bikes at the 600 mile checkup. The fill was and is done thru the ABS sensor hole with a measured amount of gear oil, after the drive is rotated back into position. The "drain" plug is to be replaced with a new one that has a magnet in it.
    If you have to rotate the rear drive 90?? to have the drain face downwards, then it really isn't a "drain", is it? Why would anyone design something so that one cannot easily change a lubricant?

    Just reading this stuff makes me happy I bought a dual plug GS Adventure...and a second "spare" before they stopped making them. I won't be buying anything new for a looooong time.

  8. #38
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider
    If you have to rotate the rear drive 90?? to have the drain face downwards, then it really isn't a "drain", is it? Why would anyone design something so that one cannot easily change a lubricant?

    Just reading this stuff makes me happy I bought a dual plug GS Adventure...and a second "spare" before they stopped making them. I won't be buying anything new for a looooong time.
    I've always wondered why we don't change the fluid in our cars nearly as often or at all. I think maybe they don't pick up moisture as much. So maybe BMW was thinking this drive to be somewhat sealed and doesn't require oil changing. BTW, they further state that the oil doesn't need to be changed after the 600 mile change, that changing at the 12K mile doesn't yield any additional benefit.
    R1200GS LC Rallye
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  9. #39

    Smile my 2 cents

    There's a couple things I'd like to comment on. The first is that the warranty is 3 years but only 36K miles. May of us put 15-30K per year. Personaly I often exceed that but there're not all BMW miles. That kinda does in the time frame unless I want to cough up the bucks for an extended warranty. The second is that although there are many thousands of bikes with many thousands of miles at the rally I disagree with the notion that since it was someone elses failure it's not a problem. Remember the driveshaft problem on airhead paralever GS's or the surging of older oilheads? It disturbs me when a service manager at a BMW dealership tells me that the internet is comprised of a bunch of malcontents who complain about non factual problems. The internet is an enabler that empowers us as consumers to compare experiences and act on information.
    Always hungry when riding,
    robert

  10. #40
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjack
    I've always wondered why we don't change the fluid in our cars nearly as often or at all. I think maybe they don't pick up moisture as much.
    Most don't but I do. My Honda CR-V has 79,500 miles on it and both the manual transmission fluid and dual pump fluid in the differential have been changed at: 10K, 35K and at 69K miles so far. For under $25 in lubes and sealing rings, I can afford it.

    BTW, the differential breather has a hose attached to it and runs up to a frame member above. I'd do the same thing to my BMW rear drive if I wear riding across rivers, etc.


    Quote Originally Posted by cjack
    So maybe BMW was thinking this drive to be somewhat sealed and doesn't require oil changing. BTW, they further state that the oil doesn't need to be changed after the 600 mile change, that changing at the 12K mile doesn't yield any additional benefit.
    Somewhat sealed...means water can enter. And oil and sealing rings are so cheap, I can't afford to not change the lubes. Some years I might only put a few thousand clicks on my GS after I get back from riding overseas. Even at that, the lubes get changed before winter lay-away. Proper maintenance and care is the cost of ownership.

  11. #41
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaaaaa
    I disagree with the notion that since it was someone elses failure it's not a problem. It disturbs me when a service manager at a BMW dealership tells me that the internet is comprised of a bunch of malcontents who complain about non factual problems.
    Exactly!

    I once mentioned a very long time ago that a rear drive failure or any other failure that could cause loss of control of the vehicle, should be reported to the DOT - Safety Department. Sure enough, it has been brought up on an ADV Rider thread.

    If these number of failures are common place, maybe the dealer can tell us why camshaft or valve seat failures aren't as common; in fact, you never hear about them...cause they don't exist in any numbers.

  12. #42
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    Rear Drive Fire

    I had a rear caliper sieze up at 70mph, new R1150GS, and it caught the final drive on fire. Helluva mess. Fixed under warranty
    Roger Wiles
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  13. #43
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider
    snip
    If these number of failures are common place, maybe the dealer can tell us why camshaft or valve seat failures aren't as common; in fact, you never hear about them...cause they don't exist in any numbers.
    You weren't around in '81 thru '84 I take it...
    R1200GS LC Rallye
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  14. #44
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    ... on second thought...

    Mmmm, on second thought, I guess I'll stick with my (almost maintenance free) 1100RT, a bit longer...wj

  15. #45
    Loose Cannon flash412's Avatar
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    It is my understanding that the NHTSA has a "critical mass" number for reports. It may be five or twelve or some other number. Reports for identical issues are simply "anecdotal, isolated, anomalies" until the "critical mass" number is reached. In other words, if your BMW rear end breaks, camshaft, timing belt or some other part that is not a "normal-wear part" breaks, REPORT it. Not until the NHTSA forces BMW to make changes will changes occur.

    Anybody remember the exact failure stats from the Iron Butt Rally before the past one. BMW motorcycles represented something like (pulling numbers out of my butt) fifty percent of the entries and ninety percent of the DNF due to motorcycle failures, mostly rear ends and timing belts (IIRC). Did anyone who suffered a failure during that rally report it?

    Drag BMW's "qwality" department kicking and screaming into the twenty-first century. Otherwise, the marque will go the way of the Dodo. (Which, the way things ARE, may not exactly be a bad thing.)
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