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Thread: You wouldn't believe this engine!

  1. #1
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Exclamation You wouldn't believe this engine!

    An Aussie I met in NZ sent me this picture. A Beemer engine to the max!
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    Last edited by PAULBACH; 05-20-2006 at 11:52 PM.

  2. #2
    Emperor Norton Xaque's Avatar
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    Handlebars?

    Brakes?

    I'll stick with my R bike...



    -Xaque-
    -Zack

    "If you love your motorcycle, set it free. If it comes back, you probably high-sided."

  3. #3
    I wonder how the motor spins in the frame? A Photoshop pic is it?

  4. #4
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Have no idea

    Have no idea. Looks like something you would fly not drive.

  5. #5
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    I know what it is!

    Pilot here and seen these in another format....Airplanes! BMW built these engines for a lot of airplanes over the early years. These radial engines are very common WW2 era engine and beyond. Of course BMW got its start building Airpalne engines in the late teens, a tad bit before cycles came along. WW1 dried up and the need for such did, too. Therefore the 1923(I Think) BMW cycle was born from the earlier aircraft engines. Its a tad bit funny looking in this bike picture. Cool work, though. HP and torque here is HUGE! Randy13233

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear
    Pilot here and seen these in another format....Airplanes! BMW built these engines for a lot of airplanes over the early years. These radial engines are very common WW2 era engine and beyond. Of course BMW got its start building Airpalne engines in the late teens, a tad bit before cycles came along. WW1 dried up and the need for such did, too. Therefore the 1923(I Think) BMW cycle was born from the earlier aircraft engines. Its a tad bit funny looking in this bike picture. Cool work, though. HP and torque here is HUGE! Randy13233

    Doesn't the radial engine spin (hence the name as I was told), and the centrifugel force feed oil and fuel and cooling etc? Surely this could not be feasible in such a frame right? Or am I missing something (and I frequently am)?

  7. #7
    screwtop
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    Those radials are really cool. At the Smithsonian Air Museam at Dulles Airport, they have a mechanical virtual "cut-away" of one of those radials and show the crank/flywheel rotating and staggered firing order of the cylinders and other moving parts. Wonder what it was like setting the timing on those things?

    BTW - I know BMW began as an aircraft powerplant manufacturing company, hence the roundel that represents a spinning propeller. Isn't it true that after WWI there was a some kind of a treaty signed that prohibited them from building airplane motors, so they resorted to building motorcycles? Can any history buffs confirm?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by screwtop
    Those radials are really cool. At the Smithsonian Air Museam at Dulles Airport, they have a mechanical virtual "cut-away" of one of those radials and show the crank/flywheel rotating and staggered firing order of the cylinders and other moving parts. Wonder what it was like setting the timing on those things?

    BTW - I know BMW began as an aircraft powerplant manufacturing company, hence the roundel that represents a spinning propeller. Isn't it true that after WWI there was a some kind of a treaty signed that prohibited them from building airplane motors, so they resorted to building motorcycles? Can any history buffs confirm?

    I have a a DVD that covers the history of the company that was purchased for me at the AMA museum, and that is what was stated on that version of the history yes.

  9. #9
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUDGYPAINTGUY
    Doesn't the radial engine spin (hence the name as I was told), and the centrifugel force feed oil and fuel and cooling etc? Surely this could not be feasible in such a frame right? Or am I missing something (and I frequently am)?
    Some did, most don't. The engineering issues of having the crank fixed and the engine spin made that a less than popular format. The reason its called a radial engine is because of the arrangement of the cylinders as radii of a circle.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2019 F850GSA

  10. #10
    Rally Rat PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Another version

    This is another version of radial engine motorcycle. I wonder who dreams these up and how many Fosters it takes to complete one of these machines? And, where do they hide the wings?
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  11. #11
    BOKRIJDER
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUDGYPAINTGUY
    Doesn't the radial engine spin (hence the name as I was told), and the centrifugel force feed oil and fuel and cooling etc? Surely this could not be feasible in such a frame right? Or am I missing something (and I frequently am)?
    You're right about the original radials this is a later version. Engine is stationary, the crank turns as is normal practice. As stated, HP is huge, torque is AWESOME.
    I'm sure that it is intended as a drag exhibition bike. This engine is dry sumped and would normally use a 12-15 gal oil tank with an air to oil heat exchanger. Fuel consumption is just as awesome as the torque output. Bike tank would only last about 10 min. These things are worth firing up just to hear the exhaust note, a very smooth low rolling rumble. I've spent many hours wrenching on radials. Ultra reliable in the air, but require hours of routine maintenance.

    Motard

  12. #12
    BOKRIJDER
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    Interesting, on the second bike it appears that they are pulling power off an accessory drive pad rather than off the crankshaft itself. The flywheel effect would be horrendous. Probably a feat to keep it between the barricades. Nor is the engine design intended for acceleration but rather for hours at a sustained RPM.
    Anything for a laugh.

    Motard

  13. #13
    HODAG
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    Quote Originally Posted by screwtop
    Isn't it true that after WWI there was a some kind of a treaty signed that prohibited them from building airplane motors, so they resorted to building motorcycles? Can any history buffs confirm?
    yes, Treaty of Versailles

    as as I know it
    WWII chapter I

  14. #14
    ABC,AMA(LIFE),MOA,RA,IBMW MANICMECHANIC's Avatar
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    Stationary cylinders, rotating crank=radial engine
    Stationary crank, rotating cylinders=rotary engine

    Although both types have cylinders in a radial arrangement.
    F.O.G.Rider, Rounder #6,
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  15. #15
    Don't forget your towel
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    I thought a "rotary" engine looked like this:


    Is there more than one type in the classification?

    Whatever happened to the old Norton rotary bikes? I remember reading about a police model in England and some controversy about how to rate it for engine size which eventually led it to being dropped from racing.

    Steve
    Last edited by sgborgstrom; 05-19-2006 at 04:42 PM. Reason: cat-vs-keyboard

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