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Thread: Brake Pads Recommendation

  1. #1
    Left Coast Rider
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    Brake Pads Recommendation

    To finish off the subject I started in the RS Thread regarding my search for brake pads with better bite for my R1200RS, I can now recommend Vesrah VD-9070-RJL ($140 for a full set of 4 front pads) or VD-9070-RJL-SS (if you're the Last of the Demon Out-Brakers).

    Not only do they bite better, they simply feel a lot better. Less lever effort. Very controllable as compared to the stock pads which perform like they're made of wood and have about the same stopping power. Fits the RT as well.

    The Vesrah brake pads have a backing plate which is about twice as thick as the stock ones. This is meant to eliminate pad distortion and keep the braking material flat against the disc. Together with a material which is friendly to the rotor and doesn't create a lot of dust, I'd say it all works. I tried them in the mountains yesterday hence this recommendation.

    I got mine from www.kurveygirl.com . Ordered on Thursday and got them on Saturday. They even include a sanding block to prep your discs before installation - a 5 minute job.

  2. #2
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    Seems like 2x thicker backing plates means much thinner pads. Let us know how long they last?
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  3. #3
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post

    I got mine from www.kurveygirl.com . .
    Were you really looking for brake pads when you found that site
    Lee
    2022 R1250RS
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes: 2016 R1200RS, 2011 K1300S, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

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    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Were you really looking for brake pads when you found that site


    DeVern
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST 2010 K1300GT 2018 R1200GS
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Were you really looking for brake pads when you found that site
    Ok, I'm not gonna lie to ya....


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    Seems like 2x thicker backing plates means much thinner pads. Let us know how long they last?
    I thought the same before I received them. Pad material is roughly equivalent to stock pads. Installation was a snap as the calipers have no problem accommodating the new pads. As always when replacing brake pads, a piston retracting tool comes in really handy.

  7. #7
    Insatiable Cruiser rtwiz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    To finish off the subject I started in the RS Thread regarding my search for brake pads with better bite for my R1200RS, I can now recommend Vesrah VD-9070-RJL ($140 for a full set of 4 front pads) or VD-9070-RJL-SS (if you're the Last of the Demon Out-Brakers).

    Not only do they bite better, they simply feel a lot better. Less lever effort. Very controllable as compared to the stock pads which perform like they're made of wood and have about the same stopping power. Fits the RT as well.

    The Vesrah brake pads have a backing plate which is about twice as thick as the stock ones. This is meant to eliminate pad distortion and keep the braking material flat against the disc. Together with a material which is friendly to the rotor and doesn't create a lot of dust, I'd say it all works. I tried them in the mountains yesterday hence this recommendation.

    I got mine from www.kurveygirl.com . Ordered on Thursday and got them on Saturday. They even include a sanding block to prep your discs before installation - a 5 minute job.
    My bike also could use a bit more brake bite. Sadly, Kurvygirl doesn't list pads for my '22 GSA. I tried EBC HH pads. They're about 10% better than stock and don't make a lot of dust or noise. I'd try these on the front if I could get them. I will say the HH pads saved my bacon once already. I had to undo a bad passing decision very quickly. All that was needed afterward was a quick change of underwear. I think it might not have gone as well with the stock pads.

    Anyway, a small investment that can pay dividends.
    2022-R1250 GSA Triple Black, Low Suspension; 40mm Risers;Touring Screen; Conti TA3
    -2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R; 20K 6/2018
    TRADED: 2017 R1200RT; Carbon Black;
    SOLD: 2005 R1200RT; Black repaint; Wilbers adj. susp; Bar-baks; Sargent seats; 94K 6/2018.

  8. #8
    Insatiable Cruiser rtwiz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    I thought the same before I received them. Pad material is roughly equivalent to stock pads. Installation was a snap as the calipers have no problem accommodating the new pads. As always when replacing brake pads, a piston retracting tool comes in really handy.
    Fiddlestix! Just use a partially removed pad as a lever to push the pistons into the calipers. Been doing that on cars and motorcycles for decades. Always works. Just remember not to apply the brakes before you've got the new pads installed and the caliper back on the wheel assembly. ...or you could splurge and put a block of wood or something in there.
    2022-R1250 GSA Triple Black, Low Suspension; 40mm Risers;Touring Screen; Conti TA3
    -2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R; 20K 6/2018
    TRADED: 2017 R1200RT; Carbon Black;
    SOLD: 2005 R1200RT; Black repaint; Wilbers adj. susp; Bar-baks; Sargent seats; 94K 6/2018.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtwiz View Post
    Fiddlestix! Just use a partially removed pad as a lever to push the pistons into the calipers. Been doing that on cars and motorcycles for decades. Always works. Just remember not to apply the brakes before you've got the new pads installed and the caliper back on the wheel assembly. ...or you could splurge and put a block of wood or something in there.
    Different strokes.

    Have you ever used a piston retractor? No muss, no fuss!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Different strokes.

    Have you ever used a piston retractor? No muss, no fuss!
    I have used piston retracting tools. And honestly, wasted money. Worse when you have certain vehicles that require a special retracting tool......With motorcycles, I just push then in with my hands, it's not like a car/suv where you need your mentioned tool. I have a simple tool I use on my 2001 Subaru forester, it's called a C-Clamp and I use the old pads between the pistons and the C-Clamp. I used to own a Mercedes and VW an they both required special piston retracting tools, so one just rents them from Autozone. And on my 2013 Nissan Leaf, I have yet to even put any wear on any of the pads on it's 4 corners. So definitely will not be spending a retraction tool for either the Subaru or Nissan, IMHO wasted money.
    2010 R1200RT, 2022 G310R
    Sargent Low Heated Driver Seat
    2007 Burgman 400 - Sold
    Now DFW, TX, used to live - Vancouver, BC

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by etiennelau View Post
    I have used piston retracting tools. And honestly, wasted money. Worse when you have certain vehicles that require a special retracting tool......With motorcycles, I just push then in with my hands, it's not like a car/suv where you need your mentioned tool. I have a simple tool I use on my 2001 Subaru forester, it's called a C-Clamp and I use the old pads between the pistons and the C-Clamp. I used to own a Mercedes and VW an they both required special piston retracting tools, so one just rents them from Autozone. And on my 2013 Nissan Leaf, I have yet to even put any wear on any of the pads on it's 4 corners. So definitely will not be spending a retraction tool for either the Subaru or Nissan, IMHO wasted money.
    Seriously?

    Now, back to the subject of brake pads....

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtwiz View Post
    My bike also could use a bit more brake bite. Sadly, Kurvygirl doesn't list pads for my '22 GSA.
    If you have Brembo calipers the part number is VD-9070JL.

    If you have Hayes calipers the part number is VD-9088JL.

  13. #13
    Insatiable Cruiser rtwiz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Different strokes.

    Have you ever used a piston retractor?

    Yup.


    No muss, no fuss!
    One more tool to get out of the toolbox, clean and return to the toolbox...and for what? It's super easy to push the pistons back, especially if you half-pull out the pad and use it as a lever.

    I guess the main point is DIY vs dealer? I'm for DIY no matter how you do it. Both ways work.
    2022-R1250 GSA Triple Black, Low Suspension; 40mm Risers;Touring Screen; Conti TA3
    -2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R; 20K 6/2018
    TRADED: 2017 R1200RT; Carbon Black;
    SOLD: 2005 R1200RT; Black repaint; Wilbers adj. susp; Bar-baks; Sargent seats; 94K 6/2018.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtwiz View Post
    I guess the main point is DIY vs dealer? I'm for DIY no matter how you do it. Both ways work.
    I'm not a dealer and I spent 20 bucks on the retracting tool. If one would rather do it their own way they are welcome to do it their way. I'm merely trying to help the general community with my experience - like I did when I researched the part numbers for the brake pads for your bike, rtwiz. If someone wants to be critical of the way I do things perhaps they may want to look in the mirror before posting.

    I'm out.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Seriously?

    Now, back to the subject of brake pads....
    You sir brought up the piston retraction tool.
    2010 R1200RT, 2022 G310R
    Sargent Low Heated Driver Seat
    2007 Burgman 400 - Sold
    Now DFW, TX, used to live - Vancouver, BC

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