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Thread: Tire Info requested

  1. #1
    Ute's Chauffeur cruisincruzan's Avatar
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    Tire Info requested

    Leaving tomorrow on a 2 week trip with my wife on my 21 RT. This AM noted my rear is flat. We have a pretty tight time frame and I have been unsuccessful in getting a tire today. I happen to have brand new Michelin 6 tires I was going to put on my 9T but they are not the GT variant. How necessary is that? The trip will be about 3000 miles including abundant twisties.

  2. #2
    Registered User r0ckrat's Avatar
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    Businesses are open, I would suggest calling Michelin direct, or if you can't get someone on the line, Revzilla.

  3. #3
    Registered User GTRider's Avatar
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    Which worries you most: running a rear tire that’s a bit lower on weight rating than what you’d normally run, or running a rear tire that’s been correctly patched (from the inside)? That’s the crux of your decision.

    Personally, I’d locate and mark the leak on the tire, spoon it off the rim, and do a proper inside-out patch then run it. Any MC shop might be able to do that if you don’t have equipment or skills needed for the job—if their insurance will allow it. Inside-out patches are also available at any good tire store and many auto parts stores, if you’re up to removing and patching the tire yourself. After the trip I’d spoon on a new set of GTs.

    But, I’m cheap and don’t carry passengers anymore, don’t know how many miles are on the tire, haven’t seen the size of whatever caused your leak, and don’t know how heavily you’re planning on loading the bike, and…

    Best,
    DeVern
    DGerber
    1983 R80ST 1984 R80 G/S-PD 2004 K1200GT w/Hannigan S/C 2010 K1300GT 2018 R1200GS
    BMWMOA#52184, AMA#271542, IBA#138

  4. #4
    What is the source of the leak? If a sliced tire or a gigantic hole, you probably do need a new tire. If the is hole from a staple, screw, nail, glass or such, have you considered plugging the tire? Or put differently, what would be your plan should you have encountered this flat during your upcoming trip?

    Plugging if done properly will last the life of the tire and are quick and easy to install. It's not the solution to all problems but covers most.

    I picked up a 1/2" long strip of staples in my rear tire in the middle of nowhere on a steep narrow remote road in the mountains on the last day of a multiday trip, well out of cell service, and on a weekend at that a few weeks ago. I always carry plugs, plugging tool and battery powered air compressor on the bike just in case. This is the first time I've ever needed this kit, and had never personally plugged a tire before. I was back on my way in 20 minutes. Re-inflating the tire took the longest amount of that time. The tire was due for replacement upon return from the trip, so it turned out I didn't need the plug to hold for long, but also had a lot of windy/twisty miles remaining to get home for which I needed the tire to perform. The plug worked perfectly and looked completely sound, even from the inside when I pulled the old tire off a week ago. Had I not been prepared to plug the tire on my own, that 20 minute delay would have turned into an absolute nightmare.

  5. #5
    Ute's Chauffeur cruisincruzan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the comments, if I was in the middle of my trip I would put a plug in it and keep an eye on it. I found a set of Road 6 GT at Max in NY, made the 6.5 hour round trip and put the new tires on last night. Overkill, probably but I feel better, and having motorcycles has little to do with objective reasoning.

  6. #6
    Gerard jagarra's Avatar
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    This is one of the nicest tire repair kits I have used, compact, really complete with all tools needed. Never had the need to fix a motorcycle yet, but did 2 of my autos. Get spare cord plugs when you order, comes with 5.

    https://www.rockycreekdesigns.com/co...re-repair-tool

    I am not associated with Rocky Creek, just a consumer.

    cheers
    1994 R1100RS-(5/93)-,1974 R90/6 built 9/73,--1987 K75S,--1964 Triumph T100--1986 Honda XL600R

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jagarra View Post
    This is one of the nicest tire repair kits I have used, compact, really complete with all tools needed. Never had the need to fix a motorcycle yet, but did 2 of my autos. Get spare cord plugs when you order, comes with 5.

    https://www.rockycreekdesigns.com/co...re-repair-tool

    I am not associated with Rocky Creek, just a consumer.

    cheers
    That is the same tool I used for my roadside repair. The tool worked so well, I have obtained a second one to stash in my partner's car glovebox. I used the Motopressor mini-inflator. It just takes a while to inflate a K1600 rear to 42psi (6"x17" rim). I have since obtained an in-line pressure gauge, so I will have a better idea when I'm done, as the TPMS system doesn't really update the display until the wheel is spinning again.

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