Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17

Thread: Install Parabellum windshield on 1972 /5

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11

    Install Parabellum windshield on 1972 /5

    I just got a Parabellum windshield for my 1972 R 75/ and have some questions on the install. The lower mount brackets are an easy install on the pinch bolts below the signal lights. But, I have some questions on the top mounts that go on the top of the fork by removing the cap and the top nut of the forks. I didn't have the 36 mm wrench to remove that top nut yet, but on doing some reading online and reading an article from Duane Asherman, it seems that I have to be careful putting the top nut back on and tightening it. He states that the forks can be put out of line when tightening the top nut as it possibly "winds up the springs", and precautions need to be taken to prevent this. I am wondering if anyone has had cause to remove the top fork nut on this bike and retighten it, and if so, what precautions should I follow to avoid fork misalignment and possible speed wobble?

    Thanks to anyone who can give me input on this.

  2. #2
    Registered User ebeeby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    McKinney, Texas
    Posts
    688
    I have said fairing on my R75/5 1973. I don't recall any issue as mentioned. YMMV.
    1973 R75/5

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by ebeeby View Post
    I have said fairing on my R75/5 1973. I don't recall any issue as mentioned. YMMV.
    I am putting on a windshield, not a fairing, but maybe the attachments are the same. There are 2 attachment mounts that go under the fork cap nuts and 2 that attach at the pinch clamp nuts at the triple tree. (I think I got all those names correct). It is removing the fork top nuts and retightening them that I am concerned with. Duane Asherman has an in depth article about retightening those nuts without twisting the forks out of alignment, not sure so maybe someone else can advise. This is the website link https://w6rec.com/bmw-motorcycle-too...escopic-forks/

  4. #4
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    4,683
    Quote Originally Posted by erictucker123 View Post
    I am putting on a windshield, not a fairing, but maybe the attachments are the same. There are 2 attachment mounts that go under the fork cap nuts and 2 that attach at the pinch clamp nuts at the triple tree. (I think I got all those names correct). It is removing the fork top nuts and retightening them that I am concerned with. Duane Asherman has an in depth article about retightening those nuts without twisting the forks out of alignment, not sure so maybe someone else can advise. This is the website link https://w6rec.com/bmw-motorcycle-too...escopic-forks/
    I know Mr. Asherman, and while I acknowledge his contribution to the BMW community and the information on his web site, he and I have always disagreed about the "complexity" of setup of the /5 forks, with him thinking they require far more manipulation for correct operation than do I. To hear anymore about this from me will cost you a bit in beer or rum.

    It is important to assemble them correctly and to do a proper "shake down" when removing and replacing the front wheel. However, in your situation, assuming your forks are working to your satisfaction now, I would not be overly concerned with removing and replacing that top fork nut. Do only one side at a time. Don't put undue rotational stress on the fork assembly, and make sure the bottom face of that nut (the part which will contact the top of the fork springs or spacer) has some fork oil on it. The concern is about putting so much rotational force on the top of one fork tube before the nut tightens it to the top triple clamp that the top of that fork would somehow be forced out of vertical alignment. But, if you are only removing that top nut, you still have the lower tipple clamp, the fork brace, and the wheel & axle assembly holding that fork tube in vertical alignment. Any real or theoretical rotation of the springs during reassembly with work itself out during riding.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & 2022 BMW MOA Rally Co-Chair
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by GREGFEELER View Post
    I know Mr. Asherman, and while I acknowledge his contribution to the BMW community and the information on his web site, he and I have always disagreed about the "complexity" of setup of the /5 forks, with him thinking they require far more manipulation for correct operation than do I. To hear anymore about this from me will cost you a bit in beer or rum.

    It is important to assemble them correctly and to do a proper "shake down" when removing and replacing the front wheel. However, in your situation, assuming your forks are working to your satisfaction now, I would not be overly concerned with removing and replacing that top fork nut. Do only one side at a time. Don't put undue rotational stress on the fork assembly, and make sure the bottom face of that nut (the part which will contact the top of the fork springs or spacer) has some fork oil on it. The concern is about putting so much rotational force on the top of one fork tube before the nut tightens it to the top triple clamp that the top of that fork would somehow be forced out of vertical alignment. But, if you are only removing that top nut, you still have the lower tipple clamp, the fork brace, and the wheel & axle assembly holding that fork tube in vertical alignment. Any real or theoretical rotation of the springs during reassembly with work itself out during riding.

    Thanks very much. That makes a lot of sense to me. Parabellum's install instructions do say to only to do one fork at a time, which is what I would have done anyway, but I wouldn't have put the logic into play of one nut holding the forks in place while loosening the other. When searching for info on this on the internet, the only thing that ever came up was mostly about rebuilding front forks, changing springs, etc., etc. Nothing specific about just taking the top nut off, one at a time. Never worked much on one of these bikes before, as all I ever did to the one I had in the early 70's was change the oil and filter, and other basic maintenance. The internet doesn't always give the answers to a specific search. It is good to know that this forum has people who can help. I have been on the BMW Luxury Touring website for a number of years, but there isn't a lot of discussion there on the older bikes. Glad I found BMW MOA.
    Thanks again.

  6. #6
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    4,683
    Quote Originally Posted by erictucker123 View Post
    Thanks very much. That makes a lot of sense to me. Parabellum's install instructions do say to only to do one fork at a time, which is what I would have done anyway, but I wouldn't have put the logic into play of one nut holding the forks in place while loosening the other. When searching for info on this on the internet, the only thing that ever came up was mostly about rebuilding front forks, changing springs, etc., etc. Nothing specific about just taking the top nut off, one at a time. Never worked much on one of these bikes before, as all I ever did to the one I had in the early 70's was change the oil and filter, and other basic maintenance. The internet doesn't always give the answers to a specific search. It is good to know that this forum has people who can help. I have been on the BMW Luxury Touring website for a number of years, but there isn't a lot of discussion there on the older bikes. Glad I found BMW MOA.
    Thanks again.
    Everything you every want to know is on the Internet. There are just two problems: first, it's diffuse - there is no structure to find what you want to know other then search engines and they still fall short of being intelligently organized. The other is that there is more wrong information than right information, and often the wrong information looks more plausible then the right, and a person who is new to something doesn't have enough background to tell the difference. However, on our Forum here, if someone offers something questionable, you can bet others will spring in to action and correct them. This is as it should be for the benefit of all.

    Don't be shy about asking any questions. Lots of people here who want to help make your BMW experience a good one.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & 2022 BMW MOA Rally Co-Chair
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by GREGFEELER View Post
    Everything you every want to know is on the Internet. There are just two problems: first, it's diffuse - there is no structure to find what you want to know other then search engines and they still fall short of being intelligently organized. The other is that there is more wrong information than right information, and often the wrong information looks more plausible then the right, and a person who is new to something doesn't have enough background to tell the difference. However, on our Forum here, if someone offers something questionable, you can bet others will spring in to action and correct them. This is as it should be for the benefit of all.

    Don't be shy about asking any questions. Lots of people here who want to help make your BMW experience a good one.
    I found that to be true on the BM Luxury Touring forum, and I knew it would be the same on this one.

    The one thing about the internet is.... it gives us a chance to find and talk to these knowledgeable people...like yourself. Back in the 60's, when I first started riding, it was trial and error. If you had a problem, there weren't many places to turn. My first bike, a 1964 80 cc Suzuki, developed a problem that never was resolved, even by the most knowledgeable bike mechanics in my area, or by my father, who could usually fix anything. I wish to this day that I still had that bike, as I expect someone, on some bike forum somewhere, could tell me what was wrong with that bike. I pushed it home a lot, even had a friend tow me home a time or two....holding a rope in my hand that was hooked to his bumper, for an easy disconnect if necessary....not something I would probably recommend today. That was also the era before helmet laws, motorcycle driver's licenses, or even seeing a law enforcement officer in our rural area. It was a great time to be alive, but not a great time to find answers to motorcycle (or other) problems. I agree that the internet is fraught with a lot of problematic things that we have to sift through, and I applaud you, and others like you, that can give us the answers we seek; and that we can be assured that there are a lot of knowledgeable people who will "correct" those questionable comments. I am looking forward to learning a lot more about this 50 year old bike that I had such a great time riding those 50 years ago.... a time when all I ever knew was to change the oil and filter, check the air in the tires, and make sure the tank was full. When I was looking for my 2nd bike, after that 80cc Suzuki, a guy I worked with told me to get a BMW... his recommendation got me hooked on BM's, and I have enjoyed them ever since. And...trading my 2014 RT for this 1972 /5 all happened because of a random internet search....go figure.

    Thanks again.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11
    Ok, so I finally got 1 of the top fork nuts out of the forks....now...does anyone know an easy way to compress it all and get the threads started to be able to get this all squeezed back into the fork? I have tried compressing it all myself and I just can't do it. It has a washer and a spacer that compresses the spring even more than normal. I have tried using a c-clamps and other compressing tools, but there is nothing to grab onto to allow the clamps to squeeze straight down. Short of leaving the spacer and washer out, or trying to find someone with extraordinary grip strength, I am a loss. I don't want to leave the spacer out as I know it was put there when the replacement springs were put in and it must be there for a reason.

  9. #9
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    22,799
    Certainly be sure that the front wheels are off the ground or very little pressure is on them. I didn't have spacers on the tops of my springs, but using the large socket for the nut/cap, I was able to push down enough and had the leverage to turn the socket enough to catch the first thread or two. Then I went from there.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  10. #10
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    4,683
    Quote Originally Posted by erictucker123 View Post
    Ok, so I finally got 1 of the top fork nuts out of the forks....now...does anyone know an easy way to compress it all and get the threads started to be able to get this all squeezed back into the fork? I have tried compressing it all myself and I just can't do it. It has a washer and a spacer that compresses the spring even more than normal. I have tried using a c-clamps and other compressing tools, but there is nothing to grab onto to allow the clamps to squeeze straight down. Short of leaving the spacer and washer out, or trying to find someone with extraordinary grip strength, I am a loss. I don't want to leave the spacer out as I know it was put there when the replacement springs were put in and it must be there for a reason.
    I use a very long socket with extension and a ratchet to compress that retaining nut against the spring pressure while using a wrench to start the nut threads. I find a socket as large in diameter as will fit freely into the nut recess. The ratchet is something wide enough to press on - not to turn the nut. Using that I can use much of my body weight to compress the spring. I use the tool kit large stamped steel "flat" wrench to turn the nut because it lays flat and seems to fit in that area better for me, but whatever you can make work should be OK.
    Greg Feeler
    Ambassador & 2022 BMW MOA Rally Co-Chair
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

  11. #11
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    south of Los Angeles
    Posts
    3,177
    A couple of times, after tying down the back end, I've used a 2-foot piece of a wooden shovel handle - fat enough to bear down on and it had enough friction to turn the nut. Easy enough to feel the threads engaging or jamming, too.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11
    Thanks for the info, but I got it this am. I thought I would give it a couple of more attempts on the way in from Church. Didn't have much luck and thought I would do what I saw someone post who advised getting up on the pegs and giving it all your weight. I have the bike on a lift and with the handle bars off, didn't want to attempt to back it off, and putting it up on the center stand was also a bit of a challenge as I had ratchet straps tied to each side, front and back, and the front wheel was in a chock. I didn't have the front straps too tight as I didn't want to compress them, but there was weight on the wheel so I figured it might be better to get all weight off as it was probably pushing the spring up just enough to make it so I couldn't get threads started. I put a small scissor type bike lift under the bike and jacked it up enough to take the weight off the tire and the spring sunk at least 1 1/2" into the fork. It still took quite a bit to compress it enough, but I finally managed to get the threads to start and get the nut on. I also found that screwing the cap onto the nut gave me a bigger surface to push on and with no sharp edges like the nut has, gave me a much better surface to push on. It was also nice and smooth to be allow easy turning while pushing it down with the palm of my other hand. The little jack/lift proved to be very handy. Now to do the other one. I read somewhere, info on the new springs boxes I think, that only the left fork needed a spacer, so I am hoping that is right.

    Thanks for the input....may get it all back together in time to take one more ride before it snows. BTW, Parabellum could use some better installation instructions, what they send with the windshield leaves a lot to be desired. I wasn't 100% sure that I had the correct attachment piece for the left side, so I had to put attachment on the windshield and loose fit it over the headlight to make sure I had the correct piece before tightening the fork nut on top of it. However, it might not be in the correct spot to fit the screen correctly, so may have to loosen it again. Since I can only do 1 fork at a time, it would be nice to get it right the first time.

  13. #13
    Liaison 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    22,799
    Quote Originally Posted by erictucker123 View Post
    I read somewhere, info on the new springs boxes I think, that only the left fork needed a spacer, so I am hoping that is right.
    Would be nice to know where you saw that. Seems like you would want equal compression on both sides.
    Kurt -- Forum Liaison ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Would be nice to know where you saw that. Seems like you would want equal compression on both sides.
    I will see if I can find it, hopefully I didn't dream that.

  15. #15
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    south of Los Angeles
    Posts
    3,177
    As far as I can recall, the /5 forks get equal innards.
    You may be thinking of certain K bikes; for example., the K75S has different guts in each leg.
    You can see a decent picture on the MAX website - https://www.maxbmw.com/
    Slide over to "Parts" at the top, then pull down to "Classic Parts Fiche".
    The R75/5 is toward the right, second column from the right and about half-way down.
    Where it says R75/5 is an active link.
    Click on that, then near the top center of the new page, select section 31 Front Suspension.
    Clicking on the picture in the left column brings up a larger picture and the parts list in the right column.

Similar Threads

  1. Parabellum windshield for K75S
    By brhartw in forum Flying Brick K-bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-18-2009, 08:32 PM
  2. parabellum windshield
    By flgoff in forum Thumpers - F & G bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-18-2008, 08:18 PM
  3. Parabellum Windshield Kit
    By YB in IN in forum Flying Brick K-bikes
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-05-2004, 04:21 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •