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Thread: '07 F650gs Clutch Fork Release Lever torque spec?

  1. #16
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    Thanks for all the help everyone. We are supposed to leave on a trip on Sunday afternoon. This happened Tuesday. I called BMW Denver who is always extremely helpful, knowing that no one would probably have that part, and they didn't. They helpfully directed me to their competition, Foothills BMW, because they have a locator and could find me the part more quickly.

    Foothills found the part, and it expedited, and it arrived in Denver today. Denver is an 8 hour round trip over several passes from here. I asked them to overnight it to me in Gunnison at about 11:15 this morning. The parts guy said he would take it over to Fedex personally in about 1/2 hour. By 11:52 I had a notice from Fedex that it is scheduled for delivery here tomorrow.

    What great service from everyone involved.

    I hadn't thought about the function of the channel in that spline shaft. I like the idea of using a little loctite and just snugging it on there and checking it a couple of times as we go along.

    Looks like we will hit the road on schedule.

  2. #17
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    This is interesting. This is from an online BMW Service manual. Apparently the 47 to 52mm distance is when the lever is pulled to the release point. So it makes sense that the lever would have to be installed with the shaft turned as far counterclockwise as it would go.

    Screen Shot 2021-09-02 at 3.40.00 PM.png

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnclem View Post
    This is interesting. This is from an online BMW Service manual. Apparently the 47 to 52mm distance is when the lever is pulled to the release point. So it makes sense that the lever would have to be installed with the shaft turned as far counterclockwise as it would go.

    Screen Shot 2021-09-02 at 3.40.00 PM.png
    Actually, what do they mean by "Release Point?" I was first thinking the point where the clutch releases - in other words where you could move the bike if it was in gear and not running - but now I'm wondering if that means where you would first put slack in the cable if you pressed the lever forward by hand. If that makes sense.

  4. #19
    Registered User Guenther's Avatar
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    I imagine that they wanted to say "where the shaft engages with the clutch". I think at that point you can't turn the shaft lightly anymore with your "fingers".

    That would take off the slack and the distance should be +/-50mm.

    My guess!
    2017 F700GS - I wish she had a drive shaft

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guenther View Post
    I imagine that they wanted to say "where the shaft engages with the clutch". I think at that point you can't turn the shaft lightly anymore with your "fingers".

    That would take off the slack and the distance should be +/-50mm.

    My guess!
    Yes. as I put it on, that became clear. There is a little play there that give you the required 1 or 2 mm slack. It's pretty obvious when you feel it.

  6. #21
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    Just to follow up for future readers. The part did make it on time, and it looks like we will be ale to leave on schedule.

    I think one of the key things that came out of this thread, is that there is that groove cut into the shaft, and as long as the bolt is in place, the arm will not come off. Therefore, it doesn't need much torque. This also means that to remove the arm, you need to take the bolt all the way out, not just loosen it, thinking that releases the arm from the shaft. I'm guessing that some of the accounts I've read in other places of the arm being so hard to remove were due to people trying to take it off with the bolt loose, but still in place.

    I am very careful about over-tightening bolts, having done it too many times earlier in life. I was very surprised when this arm just snapped when I was trying to remove it. I don't have a picture, but if you look at the picture of the arm mechanism earlier in this thread, mine broke at about the 7 o'clock position.

    I put it back on with just a touch of LocTite on the threads, and just snugged it up a reasonable amount to tension the bolt and fully engage the splines. I used a small vise grip with a cloth in the jaws to turn the shaft as far counterclockwise as I could. It becomes pretty obvious where the arm needs to go on the shaft if you hadn't marked it when you took it off. Placed too far to the rear, and it will hit the frame when the shaft is released. Too far to the front, and it won't reach the release point.

    Thanks to everyone for the help.

  7. #22
    Registered User Guenther's Avatar
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    Thanks for reporting back and have fun with your upcoming trip!
    2017 F700GS - I wish she had a drive shaft

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