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Thread: 1992 k1100lt Brake Line and Bleed

  1. #1
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    1992 k1100lt Brake Line and Bleed

    Putting Spiegler brake lines on bike. Clymers states that bleeding on ABS K1100 must be done with a power bleeder. Is this gospel or is there another way? Seems that the non ABS can be done the old fashion way but not the ABS equipped. Never did this particular job before so any guidance will be helpful. BTW, this LONG overdue job is being done because of a rear brake applying itself. This, as it turns out, is due to the breakdown of flex hose liner and the subsequent spewing of debris internally. ( I know, I have been a real slacker in attending to brake line maintenance so this is how the gods are making me serve penance, I suppose ) Thanks for comments. - Bob
    Last edited by tourunigo; 08-14-2016 at 09:37 PM.
    Bob Weber
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
    Larry's River, Nova Scotia, CANADA

  2. #2
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm overthinking this procedure but....I also read a reference to removing the front pads when bleeding front brakes. In addition to my original inquiry, is this removal also standard procedure? - Bob

    Edit Update: I think that I found a good response to my question over at Motobrick.com. http://www.motobrick.com/index.php?topic=1135.0 Will bypass the power bleeder approach but use the front pad removal/compressed calipers plan (maybe that is common knowledge but new to me). Looking forward to accomplishing this obvious upgrade to system.
    Bob Weber
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
    Larry's River, Nova Scotia, CANADA

  3. #3
    3 Red Bricks
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    Bob,

    I use this bleeder: http://t.harborfreight.com/brake-flu...der-92924.html It works well. I made an adapter for the refill bottle using an old master reservoir lid for the front.

    The reason they recommend compressing the pistons is to minimize the amount of old fluid in the system thereby increasing the odds of getting all the old fluid replaced with new. I remove the pads and use two plastic door frame shims (most hardware stores) between the rotor and the piston to hold them back.



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  4. #4
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98lee View Post
    Bob,

    I use this bleeder: http://t.harborfreight.com/brake-flu...der-92924.html It works well. I made an adapter for the refill bottle using an old master reservoir lid for the front.

    The reason they recommend compressing the pistons is to minimize the amount of old fluid in the system thereby increasing the odds of getting all the old fluid replaced with new. I remove the pads and use two plastic door frame shims (most hardware stores) between the rotor and the piston to hold them back.



    thanks, will proceed without bleeder but will make a the shims out of wood and proceed as suggested. - Bob
    Bob Weber
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
    Larry's River, Nova Scotia, CANADA

  5. #5
    3 Red Bricks
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    Bob,

    Before you start to bleed by pumping the lever, squeeze the lever to see what the normal operateing travel is. Tape a block of wood to the grip so that the lever will not go closer to the grip than normal.

    Inside the master cylinder there is an area that the piston seal normally doesn't reach. Settled out moisture in the fluid will cause this area to corrode and pit. When you pull the lever all the way to the grip during bleeding, the piston seal travels over these pits and can damage the seal. Be safe and avoid this possible failure.

    Same on the rear. Although there is no convenient place to tape a block, try to avoid using more than 1/2 stroke.




    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  6. #6
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98lee View Post
    Bob,

    Before you start to bleed by pumping the lever, squeeze the lever to see what the normal operateing travel is. Tape a block of wood to the grip so that the lever will not go closer to the grip than normal.

    Inside the master cylinder there is an area that the piston seal normally doesn't reach. Settled out moisture in the fluid will cause this area to corrode and pit. When you pull the lever all the way to the grip during bleeding, the piston seal travels over these pits and can damage the seal. Be safe and avoid this possible failure.

    Same on the rear. Although there is no convenient place to tape a block, try to avoid using more than 1/2 stroke.




    Thank you for that. Read a variation of that on another site but you have confirmed it even moreso. - Bob
    Bob Weber
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
    Larry's River, Nova Scotia, CANADA

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