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Thread: What rider training do you recommend?

  1. #1
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    What rider training do you recommend?

    I am a ‘new’ rider. Unlike many of you road warriors, I have only been in a saddle for five years. For a number of reasons, I am trying to take a motorcycle rider training course every year.

    I live in Ontario, Canada. With our graduated licensing, there are a couple of courses, sanctioned by the Ministry of Transportation, that are offered to educate riders and shorten the progression through the levels of motorcycle licenses. I took both of these at the appropriate times on my way to becoming a fully licensed rider.

    Following those courses I began looking for more rider training, specifically targeted at road riding. I don’t want to disparage any of the courses I have taken because ultimately any training you can get should help you to be a better rider.

    That being said, the course I recently took has easily left me the most prepared to ride my bike in many situations. This course is offered by a Motorcycle Police Officer and Trainer. If I remember correctly, he is certified to train police riders on all the different police bikes so he is qualified to help you regardless of your preferred ride. His company’s 2 ˝ day course is a direct subset of the skills and techniques taught to police riders.

    If you are interested in some excellent rider training, you should look up Advanced Rider Training primarily taught by Ryan Austin and Paul Luhowy.

    If you have any questions about my experience, please feel free to reach out to me.

    I’m curious to know what rider training courses you have taken and whether you would recommend them or not.

  2. #2
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    For on-road focused training, Lee Parks's Total Control is great. I've done that, a number of track days that included instruction, as well as the MSF ERC and ARC, and the Lee Parks course is the one I'd recommend were I to pick just one. Of course, all of the above is an even better option--each training opportunity I've taken has provided obvious benefits in my riding.

  3. #3
    neanderssance man sedanman's Avatar
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    Lee Parks Total Control.
    Paul
    Stop wrestling with your motorcycle, dance with it.
    2011 R1200RT Traded
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  4. #4
    RK Ryder
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    Budd's BMW hosts Lee Park each May in Mississauga. Certainly worthwhile.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
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  5. #5
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Lots of great training suggestions, but I also suggest a few track days. Track days let you expand your skill and knowledge of you and your bikes capability, in a safe learning environment. It lets you practice what all the training told you. It is NOT racing.

    Think of track days like the driving range, or putting green, they are places to practice what you learned from the pro during that lesson.

    Not sure where in Ontario you live, but there are a lot of good tracks Toronto Motorsports Park N of Lake Erie, Shannonville up by the thousand Islands, Calibogie N of Perth, Grand Bend W of London.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
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  6. #6
    the Wizard of Oz 26667's Avatar
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    total Control

    +1
    We might as well walk. ~ Adam Guettel The Light In The Piazza
    used to own: 1982 R100T, 1984 R65, 1986K75C, 1997 R1100RT, R850R, K75S, 1978 R100RS... what was I thinking?

  7. #7
    Registered User dancogan's Avatar
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    The right type of training really depends upon what you feel you need: what areas need improvement.

    A couple of years ago, after scaring myself repeatedly on some twisty roads, I decided to try The Riders Workshop, run by Jim Ford. It was a great learning experience over the 2 days of the workshop, with a 2-way radio so all of us could hear Jim's coaching, on some of the most narrow and twisty roads I've ever seen!
    Dan

  8. #8
    Registered User mylanc's Avatar
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    My wife and I are thinking about Stayin' Safe as our next course:

    http://www.stayinsafe.com

    Lance Oliver reviewed the course and his comments can be found in these two locations:

    http://www.theridesofar.com/2015/05/...ning-rolls-on/

    http://www.revzilla.com/common-tread...et-riders-make
    2012 F650GS

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    Lots of great training suggestions, but I also suggest a few track days. Track days let you expand your skill and knowledge of you and your bikes capability, in a safe learning environment. It lets you practice what all the training told you. It is NOT racing.

    Think of track days like the driving range, or putting green, they are places to practice what you learned from the pro during that lesson.

    Not sure where in Ontario you live, but there are a lot of good tracks Toronto Motorsports Park N of Lake Erie, Shannonville up by the thousand Islands, Calibogie N of Perth, Grand Bend W of London.
    Probably the best advice in this thread. Don't worry about lap times or keeping up with the fast group. Pay attention and learn how far you can safely lean your bike over. Practice different braking techniques like trail braking. Learn how your bike feels and behaves braking during different situations and lean angles.

    A lot of bikes leave the roadway with horrific results after entering a turn with too much speed. Often times there are much better options. You have to understand your bike and its handling in order to take the right action though. Track days are an excellent way to do that, coupled with other rider training as well.

  10. #10
    sMiling Voni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancogan View Post
    The right type of training really depends upon what you feel you need: what areas need improvement.

    A couple of years ago, after scaring myself repeatedly on some twisty roads, I decided to try The Riders Workshop, run by Jim Ford. It was a great learning experience over the 2 days of the workshop, with a 2-way radio so all of us could hear Jim's coaching, on some of the most narrow and twisty roads I've ever seen!
    Jim teaches the same way I learned. Back in the '70's there wasn't any formal training that Paul and I had heard of. So, with a CB radio and a pillow speaker running into my helmet, Paul coached me as we rode. I, being the most inexperienced rider, rode in front, and Paul, with his years of riding knowledge and new found patience would point out things I was encountering as we rode. Real time. "Watch out for that truck on your left coming up to the stop sign. His wheels are still turning really slowly. I don't think he's going to stop." And much more. There is no substitute for immediate feedback like that.

    http://www.ridersworkshop.com/

    Give him a try.

    Voni
    sMiling
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  11. #11
    #13338 PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    Lots of great training suggestions, but I also suggest a few track days. Track days let you expand your skill and knowledge of you and your bikes capability, in a safe learning environment. It lets you practice what all the training told you. It is NOT racing.

    Think of track days like the driving range, or putting green, they are places to practice what you learned from the pro during that lesson.

    Not sure where in Ontario you live, but there are a lot of good tracks Toronto Motorsports Park N of Lake Erie, Shannonville up by the thousand Islands, Calibogie N of Perth, Grand Bend W of London.
    I am a proponent of quality "track schools" I am less enthusiastic about common "track days" where a club or individuals rent a track for a high speed free-for-all. I know there are occasional well run track days but what is typically missing is professional instruction or any instruction at all.

    I have taken Reg Pridmore's CLASS school a few times and Jason Pridmore's STAR school a few more. These are very good, but they are track based schools, not typical track days.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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