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Thread: 1986 R80RT TIRE vs. Tube size??

  1. #1
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    1986 R80RT TIRE vs. Tube size??

    Ok, I have an R80RT. I am taking a distance trip this summer and trying to gather the best peace of mind possible. I fear a flat. I will bring two extra tires (Front/Back) have two tire repair kits, C02 capsules, foot pump, tyre irons, etc. I would like to carry a tube(s) to cover all situations. My goal, hopefully, is to carry one tube.

    FRONT TIRE SIZE: 90/90 -18 m/c 51H

    REAR TIRE SIZE: 120/90 - 18 m/c 65V Both are Lasertec Metzeler's.

    If I were to get one tube to carry, what size would you suggest that could accommodate both tires if needed? I have an idea, just want to get another opinion(s).

    Thank You

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemike1 View Post
    Ok, I have an R80RT. I am taking a distance trip this summer and trying to gather the best peace of mind possible. I fear a flat. I will bring two extra tires (Front/Back) have two tire repair kits, C02 capsules, foot pump, tyre irons, etc. I would like to carry a tube(s) to cover all situations. My goal, hopefully, is to carry one tube.

    FRONT TIRE SIZE: 90/90 -18 m/c 51H

    REAR TIRE SIZE: 120/90 - 18 m/c 65V Both are Lasertec Metzeler's.

    If I were to get one tube to carry, what size would you suggest that could accommodate both tires if needed? I have an idea, just want to get another opinion(s).

    Thank You
    I am certainly not an expert, but I have gone by the information that I received one time. Getting a tube smaller than tire is OK as the tubes are able to stretch out. However, never put a too-large sized tube into a smaller tire as it could then get crease in it and later cause a weak spot for a leak. Of course, one should do whatever in an emergency situation.

    So ... for me, I would purchase a tube(s) to fit the smaller sized tire and use it for both tires if needed. Actually, I have heard purchasing a smaller tube than tire size is the way to go anytime.
    Last edited by jimmylee; 01-10-2014 at 01:19 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmylee View Post
    So ... for me, I would be a tube to fit the smaller sized tire and use it for both tires if needed.
    That's what I've heard too...the idea of the tube folding internally just means you're going to have another flat.
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    Please feel free to correct me if I am wrong, but as an previous 1986 R80RT owner I was under the impression the tires were tubeless, since I remember getting a flat on my R80 and plugging the tire. I guess you could run tubes in them, and if I were going to do that I would run the smaller tube. I also carried a small electric tire pump, since I never cold make the CO2 cartridges work. The pump I have currently is a Slime brand, small enough to fit under the seat of my current ride, R1200R.

    Wayne

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    you said you were going to carry spare tires with you. unless you are planning this trip to Alaska, or maybe Central America, i suspect that would be thoroughly unnecessary. Tires, especially those in metric sizes, are readily available most anywhere you go.
    Start the trip with new sneakers on the bike, and then if needed, call ahead to a dealer or major supplier (i've had great success with CycleGear, as they're a national store with a physical presence in many states) so they can have a pair ready for you as needed.
    Are you expecting to exceed 6K miles? Most tires should last at least that long, if not more.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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