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Thread: New Member In Manitoba

  1. #1
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    New Member In Manitoba

    Hi.I have recently come back into the motorcycle fold after a 27 year layoff due to studies, marriage, kids, work. I have had an old R69S Willis VW conversion in my garage ever since. I started to work on the clutch because it couldn't handle the torque of the VW engine. It ended up being a total rebuild.The engine is now 1835 cc with a 45mm Weber side draft on a custom manifold attached to dual port heads. It has never run with this engine.

    I still don't have time to wrench it so I am looking for a mid 80"s or so R100RT. If anyone north of the medicine line has one, let me know.

    Beemerboy

  2. #2
    RK Ryder
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    Welcome to the Forum, neighbour!

    All the best with your search for your "new to you" airhead.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  3. #3
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard fellow Canadian. Hope you find the bike your looking for.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  4. #4
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    Welcome, and hope you find your bike.

    Keep in mind that U.S. bikes that are older than 15 years are RIV exempt.
    Last edited by Rinty; 09-30-2013 at 02:15 PM.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  5. #5
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    A hearty welcome, Ajac!

  6. #6
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    Riv

    Say, Rinty.
    How does all this RIV work? I know there are more scoots stateside than here. What is involved with bringing one over the medicine line?
    Beemerboy

  7. #7
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    Welcome!

    Hope you find what you are looking for.

    When you do we need pics.
    Ride Well

  8. #8
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajac@mymts.net View Post
    Say, Rinty.
    How does all this RIV work? I know there are more scoots stateside than here. What is involved with bringing one over the medicine line?
    Beemerboy
    Transport Canada has contracted all U.S. to Canada motor vehicle import processing to Livingston International Inc., who operate under the name Registrar of Imported Vehicles. To make a very long story shorter, if you're importing an under 15 year old bike, at the time of import, the Canadian Border Services officer will have you pay a fee and fill out a form, which they send to RIV's office. You then take the bike to a motorcycle tech that you trust, who is also an authorized provincial inspection facility. They will help you comply the bike to Transport Canada standards, which basically is a daytime running light and a metric speedometer. You then take the bike to a Canadian Tire outlet (use one that your tech recommend), and they inspect it for compliance, and send their report to RIV. A few days later RIV will send you the sticker and a compliance letter. The tricky part of all this is getting a Recall Clearance Certificate from a dealer or the distributor that says there are no outstanding recalls on the bike.

    The other thing to watch is that the U.S. border station where you intend to do the export requires 72 hours notice of your bike's arrival there.

    But if you get a mid '80s bike, you don't have to do the RIV stuff, just your province's inspection requirements, which are less complicated.

    There are tons of threads on this topic, just do some advanced searches under "RIV" in the Canadian sub forums here. If the search engine doesn't work, just use Google. Also, RIV's website is pretty easy to navigate.

    Good luck.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  9. #9
    Happily Bent dieselyoda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RINTY View Post
    Transport Canada has contracted all U.S. to Canada motor vehicle import processing to Livingston International Inc., who operate under the name Registrar of Imported Vehicles. To make a very long story shorter, if you're importing an under 15 year old bike, at the time of import, the Canadian Border Services officer will have you pay a fee and fill out a form, which they send to RIV's office. You then take the bike to a motorcycle tech that you trust, who is also an authorized provincial inspection facility. They will help you comply the bike to Transport Canada standards, which basically is a daytime running light and a metric speedometer. You then take the bike to a Canadian Tire outlet (use one that your tech recommend), and they inspect it for compliance, and send their report to RIV. A few days later RIV will send you the sticker and a compliance letter. The tricky part of all this is getting a Recall Clearance Certificate from a dealer or the distributor that says there are no outstanding recalls on the bike.

    The other thing to watch is that the U.S. border station where you intend to do the export requires 72 hours notice of your bike's arrival there.

    But if you get a mid '80s bike, you don't have to do the RIV stuff, just your province's inspection requirements, which are less complicated.

    There are tons of threads on this topic, just do some advanced searches under "RIV" in the Canadian sub forums here. If the search engine doesn't work, just use Google. Also, RIV's website is pretty easy to navigate.

    Good luck.
    Essentially that is correct. Two things, one Manitoba specific, you need your Provincial MVI first before the Federal safety. The second one is a bit fuzzy; any VISIBLE instructions must be in both languages.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

  10. #10
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    Good info on RIV

    Thanks, all for the info.
    So does the 72 hr requirement apply stateside regardless of the bike's age? I'm thinking so. Too bad that Oct is already here. I don't relish the idea of riding in sub zero temps to get a scoot home. When I lived in Calgary eons ago I would ride my Bonneville in January during a chinook. Not the brightest move but it was too tempting to resist. Don't think I would risk it now.

  11. #11
    Happily Bent dieselyoda's Avatar
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    72 hours, cast in stone.

    The US side demands the 72 hours and not so much as a minute before regardless of age/type of vehicle.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

  12. #12
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemerboy View Post
    Thanks, all for the info.
    So does the 72 hr requirement apply stateside regardless of the bike's age? I'm thinking so.
    BB: I looked at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Service website, and do not see any exemption for older motor vehicles. The 15 year rule is Transport Canada's.

    What CBP does is check for encumbrances and leases, and theft reports, on departing motor vehicles; thus their 72 hour processing time. If the motor vehicle is clear, the CBP officer will stamp the original certificate of title, but without that stamp, Canada Border Services will not process the import.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  13. #13
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    Thanks for all the good info. Much appreciated.

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