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Thread: Snowflake rear wheel & Michelin Pilot Active, 4.00 x 18

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmylee View Post
    I, still would like to have BOTH wheels mounted with Pilot Activs. the front went on like a piece of cake! There rear refused. I Have the Snowflakes. I ended up using the "Vintage" Dunlop of the correct size and I really like it, but suspect it will wear earlier than I would like. However, I heard someone who said that he got lots of miles on his Dunlop of the same type and size.

    I am going to purchase the Michelin the next time I need one, from a dealer and let them install it and have the headaches.
    ***************
    Follow the directions in the following article, section k through p:
    http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/TireRepair.htm
    I too have had fun and games with the Michelin Pilot Activ. If you follow my advice in k through p, it should go on fairly easily.
    BTW...using anything over around 60 or 70 psi is VERY VERY dangerous. The tire can explode;........but the RIM CAN TOO.
    Having aluminum shrapnel flying around is not a great idea. THINK about what that 100PSI really meant.
    snowbum

  2. #17
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    There is a product called 'Bead-Eze' It is available at Grainger stores if you have one near...although they will ship, I'm sure.

    You might also try an Auto tire store & see if they'll help ? or perhaps sell you a small amount.

    The product does work better by far , than soap & water. Just be sure to clean off any excess, and let it dry..before final inflation & mounting.

  3. #18
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 71243 View Post
    There is a product called 'Bead-Eze' It is available at Grainger stores if you have one near...although they will ship, I'm sure.

    You might also try an Auto tire store & see if they'll help ? or perhaps sell you a small amount.

    The product does work better by far , than soap & water. Just be sure to clean off any excess, and let it dry..before final inflation & mounting.
    For sure ... the ONLY thing that should be used is tire lube designed for the purpose. It turns NOT slippery when dry, while all the cheapskate solutions don't. You can get a gallon jug at NAPA.

    And if you're serious about Airheads--and you can take to the bank USA tire importers are not--you can order tube-type tires from Europe in Airhead sizes and not have these problems. Not from Michelin, however.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  4. #19
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    I had never heard of these tires, so I read some reviews on them yesterday. They are high mileage tires, and very popular with the trike crowd. Most of the users were happy with them.

    But with the fitting problems, I think I would be looking at something else, if I still had an Airhead.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by RINTY View Post
    But with the fitting problems, I think I would be looking at something else, if I still had an Airhead.
    I have Michelin Pilot's front and rear on my /7...not a single problem mounting them. Well, I didn't do it but the BMW shops did it for me!!
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  6. #21
    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RINTY View Post
    I had never heard of these tires, so I read some reviews on them yesterday. They are high mileage tires, and very popular with the trike crowd. Most of the users were happy with them.

    But with the fitting problems, I think I would be looking at something else, if I still had an Airhead.
    Pilot Actives front and rear on both of my Airheads. When I hear somebody categorize a tire as "high mileage", I think of a hard rubber and a good highway tire; not a sporty tire good on the curves. This not my experience with Pilot Active tires. They are very responsive and grippy tires. Mileage is okay; not terrible but not high mileage.

    Never heard a complaint from the shop that mounts them for me.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by m_stock10506 View Post
    Pilot Actives front and rear on both of my Airheads. When I hear somebody categorize a tire as "high mileage", I think of a hard rubber and a good highway tire; not a sporty tire good on the curves. This not my experience with Pilot Active tires. They are very responsive and grippy tires. Mileage is okay; not terrible but not high mileage.

    Never heard a complaint from the shop that mounts them for me.
    Next time, I will have the shop mount them, which means I will have to purchase from shop as well!

    I did, however, take to local, very large Motorcycle dealer, and they couldn't get to seat either, even with "proper" tire lube!!

  8. #23
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    I went to the library and saw this guy reading this book. I have to check it out when he brings it back....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    I went to the library and saw this guy reading this book. I have to check it out when he brings it back....
    Smart guy!!

    That's in addition to the other book I authored, "The Two Most Humble People in The World, And How I Taught The Other One."

    JimmyLee

  10. #25
    Registered User rapz's Avatar
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    I have a friend that always ran tubeless on the snowflake rims. Did you try mounting it without the tube? ...btw, I use tube type tires.
    Website: www.airheadmoto.com
    IBA No. 58411
    Current Bike 1979 BMW 100RT; 2013 BMW R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition; 2008 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 105th Anniversary Edition

  11. #26
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    Going tubelsess?

    Quote Originally Posted by rapz View Post
    I have a friend that always ran tubeless on the snowflake rims. Did you try mounting it without the tube? ...btw, I use tube type tires.
    No, I didn't. That would take a modification to the rim to install a valve stem. I don't want to risk doing that, and the tire still not seat. Though I have defended strongly the notion of going tubeless on the Snowflakes (an others) as there have been numerous testimonials of those who have done so, and I have yet to hear of any sort of failure, I am not wanting to go tubeless myself. Although, I may in the future, as it is getting harder and harder to find a dealer who even carries tubes - unless they have a strong clientele of those who own older bikes - like me!

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rapz View Post
    I have a friend that always ran tubeless on the snowflake rims. Did you try mounting it without the tube? ...btw, I use tube type tires.
    With all the controversy over running tubeless with snowflakes, running the front with a tube and the rear without makes an interesting compromise.

    1) Critical front tire uses the "validated" safe process
    2) Rear tire failures are much easier to ride out than front.
    3) More rear flats than front (my history) put tubeless roadside repair where it is needed most.
    4) Carry a rear tube in case you have a flat you can't repair (or bead unseats and won't reseat).

    I'd expect stern opposition from the usual suspects, but it seems to warrant consideration. I have a set of Pilot Activs and a set of snowflakes set aside for a current build, but have only thus far run tubed tires on spokes. I'm still a sinner though because I run metric sized Spitfires.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemerphile View Post
    With all the controversy over running tubeless with snowflakes, running the front with a tube and the rear without makes an interesting compromise.

    1) Critical front tire uses the "validated" safe process
    2) Rear tire failures are much easier to ride out than front.
    3) More rear flats than front (my history) put tubeless roadside repair where it is needed most.
    4) Carry a rear tube in case you have a flat you can't repair (or bead unseats and won't reseat).

    I'd expect stern opposition from the usual suspects, but it seems to warrant consideration. I have a set of Pilot Activs and a set of snowflakes set aside for a current build, but have only thus far run tubed tires on spokes. I'm still a sinner though because I run metric sized Spitfires.
    I did take a lot of heat (and some good-natured kidding) about the whole thing - defending the tubeless-on-tube-type rim - especially the Snowflakes. Some people are very devoted to "whatever was engineered and nothing else" - even when, in my opinion, it has been proven to work.

    However, this whole thread started because I couldn't get a proper sized Michelin Pilot Activ (4.00 - 18) to seat on my Snowflake (with a tube). If you eventually do put your Michelin Pilot on the back snowflake can you let us know how readily it "seated" and if so, how it was accomplished, please?

    I still want to get one when my present Vintage, proper size, Dunlop wears off the tread which will be probably rather quickly as it is a very coarse, period-type tread - used lots on bikes like Triumphs, BSAs. and others. I want to go with a smoother tread, and the Michelin Pilot is perfect for what I want. I just can't seem to get one to fit on my bike. Next time I will purchase from dealer and let them deal with the hassles making it fit.

  14. #29
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    I am all for experimenting. This is the only way that humankind is going to improve!

  15. #30
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    Another "trick" I forgot to mention earlier. Is to first mount the tire [with] a tube in it, let it sit [inflated] for a day or two so the tire can seat. Then break down just one side, remove the tube, add a bit of proper lube & immediately re-inflate.

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