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Thread: fuel pump failure?

  1. #16
    aapasquale
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    Have checked all fuses and switched appropriate relays around and cross-checked them. All seem to be functioning as they should. hot-wired the fuel pump through large connector under right side of tank. all I hear is a slight click from fuel tank, but nothing turns. Seems to me this would indicate some type of fuel pump failure and not a wiring problem.

    question: on this bike, with the sidestand down, would the engine crank and just not start....or.......would nothing happen until sidestand is brought up? I will check this in the A.M. Do not have bike with me this evening.
    My next step, after this question is answered, is to remove fuel tank from bike and have at it.

    Tony

  2. #17
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aapasquale View Post
    .. hot-wired the fuel pump through large connector under right side of tank. all I hear is a slight click from fuel tank, but nothing turns.
    That is pretty much textbook for a bad pump. Good ear!
    Anton Largiader 72724
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  3. #18
    aapasquale
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    thanks! I certainly am looking forward to having my bike back!

  4. #19
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aapasquale View Post
    thanks! I certainly am looking forward to having my bike back!
    Glad to hear you found the problem. And the clicking sound you hear means the wiring is not the problem!

    When you get it out try hooking it up to a battery in reverse polarity. Read about that trick here and I think it was Paul Glaves who posted it. Sometimes something is stuck in the impeller and spinning the pump backwards frees it up.

    I was not so lucky when mine failed. It sucked in some plastic shards from where I don't know but the filter sock was worn open and allowed the junk to get in there. Gas pumps deliver all sorts of debris to our tanks I guess.

    Check out beemer boneyard or Euromotoelectric for inexpensive pump replacements.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  5. #20
    aapasquale
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    Thanks for the tip about reversing polarity--will give it a shot--have already ordered a new aftermarket replacement from Re-Psycle in the mid-west--should arrive any day--
    Tony

  6. #21
    Registered User rxcrider's Avatar
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    While you are in there, think about replacing the hoses and filters, including the vent & water drain lines.

  7. #22
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rxcrider View Post
    While you are in there, think about replacing the hoses and filters, including the vent & water drain lines.
    A big +1 to this advice.

  8. #23
    aapasquale
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    I was already leaning towards placing the filter on the outside---any thoughts about this?

  9. #24
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    The case for doing it is that it is a quicker change next time.

    For me, the case for not mounting the filter outside the tank boils down to:

    • What does BMW know that I don't?
    • Pressure ahead of a clogged filter can exceed 100 psi. Is my motorcycle safer with the filter inside or outside?
    • The interval is only every 25,000 miles.


    RB

  10. #25
    aapasquale
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    Thanks Roger--I think you're right and I'll steer clear of this particular alteration--I'll check the lines inside to look for any deterioration--I'm averaging removing the tank about twice a year--I guess I like the fiddling around as much as the riding!

  11. #26
    aapasquale
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    Victory!!!
    Got the replacement fuel pump by USPO from Re-Psycle this morning. This is a new aftermarket one. I decided to go new as opposed to used. The OEM part is $400, this one was $200. Used could be had used for around $100. Took about 4 hours (I'm pretty slow and methodical) to remove tank and get to fuel pump. Replaced with new fuel pump and...............it works! I'm so happy to be tooling around town again. Thank you to the folks that took the time to get me going.Tony

  12. #27
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger 04 RT View Post
    [*]What does BMW know that I don't?
    It's the other way 'round... the same filter at higher pressure was used externally on the R1200ST.
    [*]Pressure ahead of a clogged filter can exceed 100 psi. Is my motorcycle safer with the filter inside or outside?
    The motorcycle is safer in the showroom. We make a lot of decisions that are contrary to ultimate safety.
    [*]The interval is only every 25,000 miles.
    But if you clog a filter because you got a bad tank of gas, then you are sitting on the side of the road with a full tank and the filter is in it.
    Anton Largiader 72724
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  13. #28
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post
    It's the other way 'round... the same filter at higher pressure was used externally on the R1200ST.
    True about the 1200ST but otherwise almost all are inside. There have to be a lot of considerations that BMW was aware of that I'm not.

    The motorcycle is safer in the showroom. We make a lot of decisions that are contrary to ultimate safety.
    Yes, but that confuses the issue. The motorcycle works perfectly well with the filter in the tank. And the flip side is the bike doesn't operate any better with it outside.

    But if you clog a filter because you got a bad tank of gas, then you are sitting on the side of the road with a full tank and the filter is in it.
    True again, but how often does that happen?

    The best reason to open the tank periodically is the weakness of the internal hoses which deserve an inspection from time to time. They fail without warning. Here's me after a few hours on the side of the road after just such a failure. when I opened the tank, the filter was fine but the internal hoses were toast.


  14. #29
    Pepperfool GSAddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbrick View Post
    Tony,

    The HES failure is actually failure of the wiring to the sensors, not of the sensors themselves, and are common in older Oilheads. HES wiring failure is more likely the cause of the bike's sudden death than a failure of the fuel pump. Here's info about the HES and its wiring:http://advwisdom.hogranch.com/Wisdom...ll_sensors.pdf In short, the wiring's insulation can't stand up to the heat (the wiring's in a hot place) and eventually fails.

    Certainly continue with the diagnostics suggested here. If the pump doesn't ever go on, it may indeed be faulty., But many of us who had HES difficulties on Oilheads (I did on my '96 R1100RSL at ~120K miles) also had fuel pumps that ran without difficulty.
    The sensors themselves DO fail, however not near as often as the insulation.
    I have rebuilt quite a few now and always tested the duds when they came in to see what failed.
    Because of this I always replaced the sensors as well as using Teflon wire when rebuilding them.
    There was no other way to provide a warranty.
    Sadly the supply of the Honeywell sensors has ended and rebuilds have come to a halt.
    '
    Ufda happens..........

    It's all about the details.

  15. #30
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger 04 RT View Post
    The best reason to open the tank periodically is the weakness of the internal hoses which deserve an inspection from time to time....
    It's good to do, but then make that an inspection on its own merit, not something piggybacked onto something else that doesn't really need to be done.

    Sure an external filter can fail, but burst filters are pretty much nonexistent after the design changed from the crimped edge to the soldered edge many years ago. It would be much more likely to have a fuel leak from a cracked QD fitting, cracked distributor pipe, leaking external line or leaking flange. You're combining unrelated things for convenience. If the filter is safe outside the tank, then it's safe outside the tank. If you should go in to check the fuel lines, then you should go in to check the fuel lines. Changing the filter is easier when its outside the tank, period.

    And most bikes can go pretty much forever on the original in-tank lines if the bike is in regular use. In the cases where they don't, it's damage caused by very old fuel or some sort of contaminant. Not mileage-related, so no correlation to 24k mile filter change interval.
    Anton Largiader 72724
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