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Thread: Colonoscopy Journal

  1. #16
    One big Oaff brewmeister's Avatar
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    My doc told me what I already knew, a perfect $##hole!
    81 R100RT

  2. #17
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Mine went well, no issues. I don't have to have another one for 5 years.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  3. #18
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    Make certain you do all the prep correctly or they make you come back again the next day........they don't charge extra for it either...

  4. #19
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    Interesting reading. I'm still a few years away from this experience, but some of y'all might be amused to know that my job is to repair endoscopes in a regional service center of the largest manufacturer in the field, and most of what comes into the shop is colonscopes. We do make a scope for just about every orifice on the human body though.

    The work is sometimes interesting if you're into mechanical stuff and engineering in general; at other times it's totally boring. The new models have some pretty cool technology in them. Despite all this, each scope also contains a small amount of hand-craftsmanship as the engineers in Tokyo have yet to come up with a better method than epoxy-reinforced, hand-tied thread for securing the bending-section cover. One interesting aspect of the work is that it's all proprietary: the company has to invent most of the tools we use, and there is no school for this except for the company training. Much of the work is on a very small scale too- for instance, I regularly work with headless screws 1.2mm dia. x 1.4mm length, and we have some that are smaller than that. I wear a headband-type magnifier much of the day and I do a lot of work under a stereo-microscope too.

    One thing that is just a little scary is the damage that we see on some scopes. The top-of-the-line colonscope sells for something north of $40K, and they often come in fairly well-smacked-around. Makes you wonder, and it's no wonder that healthcare is so expensive when you consider that it only takes a few seconds of carelessness to damage a scope to the point that it needs a $9000 refurbishment.

    And yes, the customers DO clean the scopes before they send them to us (I know you wondered!).
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  5. #20
    Registered User rickyd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrankNitti View Post
    Brother Dave wrote this....I about fell out of the chair from laughing........it's all so true

    Enjoy

    And the best one of all:
    13. 'Could you write a note for my wife saying that my head is not up there?'
    I laughed so hard I shed tears.
    Rick

    '06 BMW R1200RT
    '74 Moto-Guzzi 850-T

  6. #21
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Colonoscopy thread

    I doubt that "Camp Gears" can save any organization that has a Colonoscopy thread.............

    "Yee Haw. that was fun. Can you spare few paper towels for that quart of lube you left up in there or should I just walk out of here oozing KY jelly down my leg....?."
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  7. #22
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    I doubt that "Camp Gears" can save any organization that has a Colonoscopy thread.............

    "Yee Haw. that was fun. Can you spare few paper towels for that quart of lube you left up in there or should I just walk out of here oozing KY jelly down my leg....?."
    Funny? I don't think so. You've obviously never had a colonoscopy.

    From: http://fightcolorectalcancer.org/ima...ost-of-CRC.pdf

    What We Know About Prevention of Colorectal Cancer:
     Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death.
     Estimated new cases and deaths from colon and rectal cancer in the United States in 2012:
     New cases: 103,170 (colon); 40,290 (rectal) Deaths: 51,690 (colon and rectal combined)
     The estimated annual national expenditure for colorectal cancer treatment is $14 billion; inpatient hospital care accounts for 80% of this cost.
     Because colorectal cancer is a predominantly disease of middle and old age, the costs related to colorectal cancer treatment are likely to increase as the population ages. For example, hospital admissions for colorectal cancer are expected to double by 2050.
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  8. #23
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsuited View Post
    Funny? I don't think so. You've obviously never had a colonoscopy.

    From: http://fightcolorectalcancer.org/ima...ost-of-CRC.pdf

    What We Know About Prevention of Colorectal Cancer:
     Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death.
     Estimated new cases and deaths from colon and rectal cancer in the United States in 2012:
     New cases: 103,170 (colon); 40,290 (rectal) Deaths: 51,690 (colon and rectal combined)
     The estimated annual national expenditure for colorectal cancer treatment is $14 billion; inpatient hospital care accounts for 80% of this cost.
     Because colorectal cancer is a predominantly disease of middle and old age, the costs related to colorectal cancer treatment are likely to increase as the population ages. For example, hospital admissions for colorectal cancer are expected to double by 2050.
    Not to make light of cancer, my mom died of it when I was 10. But, I've had two colonoscopies in my life..........the first being back around 1990 when they gave you the bottle of "Fleet" and no sedation. I swear, they all left the room, and just left me oozing lube. I stood up, wiped as I could, pulled on my pants and drove home.

    Last year, because I'm now age appropriate, I got to do a redo. No more bottle of "Fleet", but a regimen of pills and apple/grape juice for a day. Now, the "procedure" can't be performed unless you have someone to drive you home and they sedate you. Back in 1990, I watched the TV monitor as the MD took polyp samples for biopsy. This time around, I was asleep for the whole thing.

    So, yes, life can be really ugly and wonderful people die of heinous diseases, but our time is finite and we we'll only get so many laughs.

    Peace.
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  9. #24
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Veg View Post
    Interesting reading. I'm still a few years away from this experience, but some of y'all might be amused to know that my job is to repair endoscopes in a regional service center of the largest manufacturer in the field, and most of what comes into the shop is colonscopes. We do make a scope for just about every orifice on the human body though.

    The work is sometimes interesting if you're into mechanical stuff and engineering in general; at other times it's totally boring. The new models have some pretty cool technology in them. Despite all this, each scope also contains a small amount of hand-craftsmanship as the engineers in Tokyo have yet to come up with a better method than epoxy-reinforced, hand-tied thread for securing the bending-section cover. One interesting aspect of the work is that it's all proprietary: the company has to invent most of the tools we use, and there is no school for this except for the company training. Much of the work is on a very small scale too- for instance, I regularly work with headless screws 1.2mm dia. x 1.4mm length, and we have some that are smaller than that. I wear a headband-type magnifier much of the day and I do a lot of work under a stereo-microscope too.

    One thing that is just a little scary is the damage that we see on some scopes. The top-of-the-line colonscope sells for something north of $40K, and they often come in fairly well-smacked-around. Makes you wonder, and it's no wonder that healthcare is so expensive when you consider that it only takes a few seconds of carelessness to damage a scope to the point that it needs a $9000 refurbishment.

    And yes, the customers DO clean the scopes before they send them to us (I know you wondered!).
    A colleague of mine uses salvaged endoscopes for engineering inspections of small conduits for cavitation damage. The rotation and pitch control is great for focusing and "snaking" thru multiple elbows.
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  10. #25
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Not to make light of cancer, my mom died of it when I was 10.
    I guess that was my point as well. I walked home from school one day when I was 7 in time to see the ambulance take my mother away. She died several months later from cancer. My dad died from cancer when I was 13.

    Colonoscopies are to fight cancer, and that's a very good thing. Everyone should take good care of their health.

    take care,

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  11. #26
    Comfortably road numb Boingo's Avatar
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    As a stage IV colon cancer survivor, I highly recommend you go though this rather minor procedure. The prep is by far the worst part of the whole thing.

    The earlier the better.
    Scott Wynter
    Pleasant Hill, CA
    1971 R75/5 SWB, 2000 R1100R
    BMWMOA, Central Cal, IBA, MFS Ridercoach, ECV.

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